New York Times: Fixing What the Internet Broke

New York Times: Fixing What the Internet Broke. “The Election Integrity Partnership, a coalition of online information researchers, published this week a comprehensive analysis of the false narrative of the presidential contest and recommended ways to avoid a repeat. Internet companies weren’t solely to blame for the fiction of a stolen election, but the report concluded that they were hubs where false narratives were incubated, reinforced and cemented. I’m going to summarize here three of the report’s intriguing suggestions for how companies such as Facebook, YouTube and Twitter can change to help create a healthier climate of information about elections and everything else.”

The Verge: SoundCloud will pay indie artists based on their actual listeners

The Verge: SoundCloud will pay indie artists based on their actual listeners. “SoundCloud’s trying something new for a major music streaming service: paying indie artists a share of their actual listeners’ subscription fees. The company calls this ‘fan-powered royalties,’ and it means a SoundCloud subscriber’s subscription fee or advertising revenue will be divvied up among the artists they actually listen to, rather than going to a big pot and being split up among the platform’s most popular artists.”

Ubergizmo: How To Create A QR Code For Your WiFi Password

Ubergizmo: How To Create A QR Code For Your WiFi Password. “We’re sure that many of us have had that experience when your friends or family members come to your home and ask for the WiFi password. Maybe you use this password for other things and you’d rather not give it outright, or maybe you’re tired of having to repeat it over and over again. Thankfully, there is a quicker way of giving your guests access to your home’s WiFi and that is by generating a QR code.”

Route Fifty: The States Where Driving Was Up and Down the Most After Covid Hit

Route Fifty: The States Where Driving Was Up and Down the Most After Covid Hit. “Bumper.com, a company that provides vehicle history reports, examined 2020 Apple Maps data to learn which states and cities saw the greatest increases and decreases in driving, public transportation use and walking. To assess the pandemic’s effect on drivers in the U.S., Bumper looked at average weekly levels of driving in states for most of last year and compared those metrics to the first three months of 2020, before the virus upended daily life.”

PsyPost: Psychological entitlement linked to defiance of COVID-19 rules via perceptions of unfairness, study finds

PsyPost: Psychological entitlement linked to defiance of COVID-19 rules via perceptions of unfairness, study finds. “People with a heightened sense of entitlement are more likely to believe that measures intended to prevent the spread of COVID-19 are unfair, which in turn is associated with reduced compliance with such measures, according to new research from China. The findings are set to appear in the scientific journal Personality and Individual Differences.”

Poynter: Vaccine gaslighting, mask falsehoods and fake cures dominate recent claims added to the CoronaVirusFacts Alliance Database

Poynter: Vaccine gaslighting, mask falsehoods and fake cures dominate recent claims added to the CoronaVirusFacts Alliance Database. “As world leaders and everyday citizens roll up their sleeves to get vaccinated against COVID-19, purveyors of falsehoods have turned to a new tactic — claiming those vaccinations were a hoax. Vice President Kamala Harris, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, and South African President Cyril Ramaphosa have all been the subject of false claims that their televised vaccinations were ‘staged.’”

Cyndi’s List Turns 25

Congratulations to genealogy resource site Cyndi’s List, which is 25 years old! “After all these years people still don’t often believe me when I say that I am the only person who works on the site. It’s true, it’s just me. This is my job, but it’s also my life’s work and my passion. I still enjoy what I do and still find it rewarding, particularly when I hear of success stories from all of you. I am happy to keep providing Cyndi’s List as a genealogical research tool for everyone to use.”

Poynter: After a devastating and deadly pandemic, how do we recover the news?

Poynter: After a devastating and deadly pandemic, how do we recover the news?. “Our work this year is making sense of what’s happened and tracking what must still happen for local news. We’re calling this work “Recovering The News,” and we plan to tell what recovery means in several ways beginning today with an oral history project featuring nearly 30 local newsrooms and press associations in mid-America. That project, The Essential Workers, comes from Teri Finneman and William Mari, two journalism professors who spent last year capturing history as it happened.”

New York Times: Colleges That Require Virus-Screening Tech Struggle to Say Whether It Works

New York Times: Colleges That Require Virus-Screening Tech Struggle to Say Whether It Works. “The University of Idaho is one of hundreds of colleges and universities that adopted fever scanners, symptom checkers, wearable heart-rate monitors and other new Covid-screening technologies this school year. Such tools often cost less than a more validated health intervention: frequent virus testing of all students. They also help colleges showcase their pandemic safety efforts. But the struggle at many colleges to keep the virus at bay has raised questions about the usefulness of the technologies.”

Mashable: There are two types of texters in the world. Which one are you?

Mashable: There are two types of texters in the world. Which one are you?. “Though you may not realize it, there are two types of texters in this world: those who send one detail-packed paragraph and those who use multiple messages to get their points across. Both styles have unique pros and cons, but chatting with someone who has different texting style than you isn’t always ideal.”