Neowin: Skype for Web preview gets screen sharing on Chrome

Neowin: Skype for Web preview gets screen sharing on Chrome. “It’s been a long time since Microsoft last shared what’s new in the latest Skype updates. The app has been getting updates somewhat consistently, and Insiders are now up to version 8.46, but the last time we had heard anything new was for version 8.43 in April. That’s changing though, as the team has shared that, with version 8.46.76.59, Skype for Web now supports screen sharing, even if you’ll need to be using Google Chrome.”

Ars Technica: Augmented reality changes how people interact and communicate, study finds

Ars Technica: Augmented reality changes how people interact and communicate, study finds. “According to researchers at Stanford University, layering computer-generated content, like someone’s avatar, onto a real-world environment will influence people’s behavior as if that person were really present. The researchers described the results of three recent experiments on the impact of AR on social interactions in a new paper in PLOS ONE.”

El Universal: UNAM creates digital collection of Mexican comic books

El Universal: UNAM creates digital collection of Mexican comic books. “Now, you can find more than 1,400 comic books in ‘Pepines,’ a website created by UNAM’s Bibliographical Studies Institute (IIB). The website is a result of 12 years of work and was developed in cooperation with the Innovation and Digital Strategy Coordination of the IIB and the Cataloging Department at Mexico’s National Newspaper Library.” UNAM is Mexico’s National Autonomous University.

YourStory: Meet the American who is creating a high-quality digital public library in India

YourStory: Meet the American who is creating a high-quality digital public library in India. “The internet was envisioned as an open standard, where information would flow freely and everyone would have access to it. In an ideal world, sure, but in the real one, free flow of information is a distant dream, with a heightened amount of data colonisation. However, there are those who refuse to give up that dream. One such is Carl Malamud.”

PCMag UK: I Killed Google and My Phone Almost Died

PCMag UK: I Killed Google and My Phone Almost Died. “I set out on a journey to sidestep Google’s version of Android and instead use free, private, and secure open-source alternatives on my phone. I made some stupid mistakes, including potentially bursting into flames, but I learned a lot along the way.” This article is frustrating as it didn’t really come to any conclusions, but it’s a fun read.

CNET: Hackers steal credit card information from Checkers fast-food chain

CNET: Hackers steal credit card information from Checkers fast-food chain. “Hackers infected checkout stations at more than 100 of the fast-food restaurant’s locations with malicious software that stole payment card information, the company said Wednesday. So when the cashier swiped your card to pay for boneless chicken wings or a triple crispy fish sandwich, the fryer got to work on your lunch and the hackers got their hands on your credit card number. The stolen information also included cardholder names, card expiration dates and card verification codes, the company said.”

Egg on North Face: Wikipedia furious after glamp-wear giant swaps article pics for sneaky ad shots – and even brags about it in a video (The Register)

The Register: Egg on North Face: Wikipedia furious after glamp-wear giant swaps article pics for sneaky ad shots – and even brags about it in a video. “The North Face tried to sneakily replace images on Wikipedia pages with shots of models wearing the outdoor-clothing biz’s clobber in an attempt to skyrocket to the top of Google Images. It was part of an ad campaign that The North Face figured out with the Brazilian branch of international admen Leo Burnett Tailor Made. They had noticed that when people searched for top nature destinations, the first few images on Google were often taken from Wikipedia pages.”

Ars Technica: Microsoft practically begs Windows users to fix wormable BlueKeep flaw

Ars Technica: Microsoft practically begs Windows users to fix wormable BlueKeep flaw. “In a Blog post published late Thursday night, members of the Microsoft Security Response Center cited findings published Tuesday by Errata Security CEO Rob Graham that almost 1 million Internet-connected computers remain vulnerable to the attacks. That indicates those machines have yet to install an update Microsoft issued two weeks ago patching against the so-called BlueKeep vulnerability, which is formally tracked as CVE-2019-0708. The exploits can reliably execute malicious code with no interaction on the part of an end user. The severity prompted Microsoft to take the unusual step of issuing patches for Windows 2003, XP, and Vista, which haven’t been supported in four, five, and two years, respectively.”