British Library: British Empire maps of Africa added online

British Library: British Empire maps of Africa added online. “Around the turn of the 20th century the British War Office in London maintained a library of original, mostly hand-drawn mapping that covered large parts of the world where detailed and reliable surveys were not otherwise available. The maps were gathered from a rich variety of sources including military expeditions, boundary commissions, explorers, travellers, missionaries and spies, and they were used by the War Office for making and revising official printed products.”

Genealogy’s Star: Reclaim the Records Files the Biggest Lawsuit Ever

Genealogy’s Star: Reclaim the Records Files the Biggest Lawsuit Ever. “If you are a genealogist and you are unfamiliar with Reclaim the Records, you should be not only familiar with them, but actively supporting them. Record access is one of the major obstacles to genealogical research. Granted, some records, such as the 1890 U.S. Federal Census have been lost through bungling and mismanagement. Other records have been lost through natural disasters and poor conservation practices. But here in the United States, many valuable genealogical records are merely unavailable to genealogical researchers either because they have been hidden behind a paywall or, what is worse, a bureaucratic wall. These obstacles affect all of us, whether we are searching out our ancestors or not.”

Techaeris: Minnesota entrepreneur launches social media site The Horn as a Facebook alternative

Techaeris: Minnesota entrepreneur launches social media site The Horn as a Facebook alternative. “While The Horn isn’t the first alternative to Facebook, check MeWe, Minds, and Mastodon (to name a few), it is sort of a different take. The Horn is a paid social network which gives you an ad-free experience and keeps your privacy, private.”

Nieman Lab: Ready to read the report?!? Despite decades of digital decay, The Washington Post’s 1998 copy of the Starr Report is still alive

Nieman Lab: Ready to read the report?!? Despite decades of digital decay, The Washington Post’s 1998 copy of the Starr Report is still alive. “As Attorney General William Barr fielded reporters at a presser (hours before releasing the actual report), the same ole Post link from 1998 made the rounds on Twitter. The only other complete file of it I could find was from the Government Publishing Office, available in plain text and PDF.”

Engadget: Hacker posts over 4,000 sensitive documents from Mexican embassy

Engadget: Hacker posts over 4,000 sensitive documents from Mexican embassy. “Thousands of documents containing sensitive information belonging to Mexico’s embassy in Guatemala were leaked online this week by a hacker. The stolen cache contained more than 4,800 files related to the embassy’s activities including its dealings with personal documents belonging to Mexican citizens.”

KPIX: Mueller Report Lays Out Social Media Companies’ Role In Election Interference

KPIX: Mueller Report Lays Out Social Media Companies’ Role In Election Interference. “Social media companies like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram became unwitting accomplices in a massive and sophisticated campaign by Russian agents to influence the 2016 Presidential election, according to the report by Special Counsel Robert Mueller that released Thursday by the Justice Department.”

Digital Scholarship Blog: Collecting Emerging Formats

Digital Scholarship Blog: Collecting Emerging Formats. “The Emerging Formats project, started in 2017 by the British Library and the other five UK Legal Deposit Libraries, has been investigating the rise of new complex digital publications that could pose new challenges for libraries and other cultural institutions in terms of collection and preservation. In particular, this project has chosen to prioritise three formats: eBook mobile apps, web-based interactive narratives, and structured data.”