Focus Taiwan: TJC unveils online database of persecutions in martial law period

This in “Around” instead of “New Resources” because I can’t find an URL for this new database. Focus Taiwan: TJC unveils online database of persecutions in martial law period. “Taiwan’s Transitional Justice Commission (TJC) on Wednesday launched a searchable online database of curated court files of nearly 10,000 victims of political persecution during the country’s martial law period. The database also contains the names of the military officers involved in the court trials of the victims.”

San Diego Union Tribune: San Diego Library giving up federal document depository status after 137 years

San Diego Union Tribune: San Diego Library giving up federal document depository status after 137 years. “Some critics are questioning why the decision was made without more public input and debate. They also say the move will cost the library some prestige and deprive users of access to some federal documents that haven’t been digitized. San Diego is one of only five libraries in the region with federal depository status. The others are the county law library and three universities: San Diego State, UC-San Diego and the University of San Diego.”

The Daily Northwestern: Northwestern student startup hopes to ‘democratize’ education with free online database for teachers

The Daily Northwestern: Northwestern student startup hopes to ‘democratize’ education with free online database for teachers. “Lighthouse is a free, collaborative platform where teachers can choose from a library of other teacher’s exercises as well as upload their own. Instead of having to resort to costly alternatives like Teachers Pay Teachers, a popular online marketplace where teachers must pay for lesson materials, Lighthouse will be a way for teachers to access an entire collection of problems and learning tools for free.”

The Markup: Swinging the Vote?

The Markup: Swinging the Vote?. “Pete Buttigieg is leading at 63 percent. Andrew Yang came in second at 46 percent. And Elizabeth Warren looks like she’s in trouble with 0 percent. These aren’t poll numbers for the U.S. 2020 Democratic presidential contest. Instead, they reflect which candidates were able to consistently land in Gmail’s primary inbox in a simple test.” Techdirt has a thoughtful response to this story.

New York Times: It’s Facebook vs. the Bloomberg Campaign vs. the Internet

New York Times: It’s Facebook vs. the Bloomberg Campaign vs. the Internet. “When sponsored content for political candidates appears on private accounts [on Instagram], it allows those running the ads to escape the direct scrutiny that comes with a public-facing account. It also keeps non-followers in the dark about ads being run on the page and prevents users from easily searching for specific content.”

Alaska Native News: Museum Leads Effort to Preserve Alutiiq Family Photos

Alaska Native News: Museum Leads Effort to Preserve Alutiiq Family Photos. “To assist Alutiiq families with the preservation of their paper photographs the Alutiiq Museum is leading a Community Photo Archive project. In the coming months, museum staff members will work with tribal councils and community members to identify Alutiiq family photos, scan the images, and create digital copies to their owners. Staff members will invite families to deposit digital copies with the museum, but sharing is not a requirement for participation. This one-year effort is funded by the US Bureau of Indian Affairs with assistance from the Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak.”

Garbage Language: Why do corporations speak the way they do? (Vulture)

Vulture: Garbage Language: Why do corporations speak the way they do?. “Garbage language isn’t unique to start-ups; it’s endemic to business itself, and the form it takes tends to reflect the operating economic metaphors of its day. A 1911 book by Frederick Winslow Taylor called The Principles of Scientific Management borrows its language from manufacturing; men, like machines, are useful for their output and productive capacity. The conglomeration of companies in the 1950s and ’60s required organizations to address alienated employees who felt faceless amid a sea of identical gray-suited toilers, and managers were encouraged to create a climate conducive to human growth and to focus on the self-actualization needs of their employees. In the 1980s, garbage language smelled strongly of Wall Street: leverage, stakeholder, value-add. The rise of big tech brought us computing and gaming metaphors: bandwidth, hack, the concept of double-clicking on something, the concept of talking off-line, the concept of leveling up.” Long but interesting.