Ars Technica: Selfies show worm slithered through woman’s face for 2 weeks

Ars Technica: Selfies show worm slithered through woman’s face for 2 weeks. WARNING: the pictures in this story are not traditionally gory, but they left me nauseated. “A 32-year-old woman who visited a rural area outside of Moscow returned home with a surprising stowaway—in her face. And it was a restless one at that, according to a short report published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM).”

KissKissBankBank: PeerTube, a free and federated video platform

From the crowdfunding site KissKissBankBank. Looks like it’s already funded and will launch in October: PeerTube, a free and federated video platform. “PeerTube is a practical answer to all video-tubes that centralize our data and attention. With it, videos can be hosted by the people, with the people, for the people. PeerTube is a software anyone can install on a server, to get a data-friendly video-hosting platform, called a PeerTube Instance.”

The Parallax: Meet WeChat, the app that’s ‘everything’ in China

The Parallax: Meet WeChat, the app that’s ‘everything’ in China. “It takes just six characters to spell ‘everything’ in China, and Mandarin fluency isn’t required. The far-more-than-messaging app WeChat dominates the mobile Web here. That’s been very good for WeChat developer Tencent Holdings, which in March revealed that this iOS and Android app, which has made online and real-world commerce vastly easier in China, had attracted more than a billion users. But Tencent still has to play by the Chinese government’s rules, and Western human rights advocates have found little promise in WeChat’s rise.”

Smithsonian Magazine: Museum Ties Portraits of the Wealthy to Their Slaveholding Pasts

Smithsonian Magazine: Museum Ties Portraits of the Wealthy to Their Slaveholding Pasts. “Photography has made it possible for pretty much everyone to sit for a portrait—or at least a selfie. But having your portrait painted by a genuine artist is still an honor reserved for the rich, the powerful or the friends of art students. It was the same in the past—only the wealthy could afford to have their likeness put on canvas, which is why our art museums are full of rich people wearing their finest outfits glaring at us from their good sides. But the Worcester Art Museum in Massachusetts is also highlighting the hidden warts, adding signs to its portrait collection illuminating many of the subjects’ deep connections with slavery, reports Maria Garcia at WBUR.”

Boing Boing: China has perfected the internet control playbook and now it’s exporting it to the world

Boing Boing: China has perfected the internet control playbook and now it’s exporting it to the world . “After decades of back-and-forth over internet freedom, China has figured out a method for allowing people to use the internet for social and business purposes, but not for political reform — a combination of huge boiler-rooms full of censors, centralization of internet services under tight government control, and control over standards to ensure that surveillance and censorship are always possible. At the same time, China’s increasing wealth, combined with other large powers’ increased austerity and withdrawal from foreign aid, has enabled it to create large and growing spheres of influence over other states in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas, and these trading partners look to China for examples of how to create their own internet policies.”

CNN: American media keeps falling for Russian trolls

CNN: American media keeps falling for Russian trolls. “Russian trolls posing as an American college student tweeted about divisive social, political and cultural issues using an account that amassed thousands of followers — and appeared in dozens of news stories published by major media outlets — as recently as March.”

EurekAlert: Digitalisation meets the Middle Ages

EurekAlert: Digitalisation meets the Middle Ages . “Smartphones, touch screens and holograms could make museum visits a digital and multimedia experience. For example, books that for reasons of protection may not be touched by visitors, could be leafed through on tablets. Or flesh and skin could be projected on the skeleton of a dinosaur with virtual and augmented reality. The research project MEETeUX (Multi-Device Ecologies Towards Elaborate User Experience), coordinated by St. Pölten UAS, develops approaches and solutions for digital forms of exhibition design. The presentation of the Abrogans is a first prototype from the project.”