WABC-TV: How a research scientist became Insta-famous New York City photographer

WABC-TV: How a research scientist became Insta-famous New York City photographer. “Noel Y. Calingasan, Neuroscience researcher, came to New York City from the Philippines in 2001. He got himself a camera to start documenting his experiences in New York City so he could share his photographs with family and friends back home. When he started uploading his photos to a photography blog, a friend suggested he create an Instagram account to share his photos with New Yorkers and other photographers, and his following took off!” The photography in the article is terrific. Even if you don’t want to follow his Instagram just peek at the pix in the article.

Government for the People: Ukraine’s Paperwork Online (Ukraine Business Journal)

Ukraine Business Journal: Government for the People: Ukraine’s Paperwork Online. “Historically, getting official paperwork done in Ukraine — or anywhere — doesn’t happen fast. Kyiv city streets are dotted with signs for public notaries but government procedures remain paperbound and bureaucratic. But times are changing. Europe, the US and Ukraine civil society press the government here to reform. With rising pressure for efficiency and transparency, paperbound bureaucracy increasingly looks very 20th century. Instead politicians, NGO workers and enterprising techies are developing e-government platforms to fight corruption and make government more accessible to citizens.”

EIN: New Global Digital Library to Provide Free Reading Resources for Ethiopian Children (PRESS RELEASE)

EIN: New Global Digital Library to Provide Free Reading Resources for Ethiopian Children (PRESS RELEASE). “The Global Book Alliance, which is comprised of donor agencies from the United States, Norway, the UK, and other countries, is launching a new Global Digital Library in Ethiopia to increase the availability of high quality reading resources for children and youth across the country. Ethiopia was selected as the first country to launch the Global Digital Library, which is a worldwide effort to provide children with the books and learning materials they need to learn to read.”

The Guardian: Cambridge University rejected Facebook study over ‘deceptive’ privacy standards

The Guardian: Cambridge University rejected Facebook study over ‘deceptive’ privacy standards. “A Cambridge University ethics panel rejected research by the academic at the centre of the Facebook data harvesting scandal over the social network’s ‘deceptive’ approach to its users privacy, newly released documents reveal.”

Gulf Times: QNL launches Traditional Gulf Architecture Week

Gulf Times: QNL launches Traditional Gulf Architecture Week. “During the week, expert panellists will explore the Arabian Gulf’s architectural identity and its wider cultural and economic history through the story of its traditional architecture from the 1700s to the 1960s. These events form part of the QNL’s Traditional Gulf Architecture Project, which seeks to create a digital archive of historical photographs, architectural maps and drawings, and publications relating to the region’s architectural heritage.”

Washington Post: How merchants use Facebook to flood Amazon with fake reviews

Washington Post: How merchants use Facebook to flood Amazon with fake reviews. “On Amazon, customer comments can help a product surge in popularity. The online retail giant says that more than 99 percent of its reviews are legitimate because they are written by real shoppers who aren’t paid for them. But a Washington Post examination found that for some popular product categories, such as Bluetooth headphones and speakers, the vast majority of reviews appear to violate Amazon’s prohibition on paid reviews. Such reviews have certain characteristics, such as repetitive wording that people probably cut and paste in.”

Arizona State University: ASU scholars save priceless manuscripts from obscurity

Arizona State University: ASU scholars save priceless manuscripts from obscurity. “‘You never think you’re going to discover an unknown library ever in your career,’ said Corine Schleif, Arizona State Univeristy professor of art history. She and Volker Schier, a musicologist and visiting faculty at the Institute for Humanities Research, were leading the fortuitous scholars on a tour of European women’s monasteries. The Altomuenster monastery, just northwest of Munich, was their last stop. Left undisturbed for 500 years, the library contained over a thousand previously unknown manuscripts, as well as works of art and devotional objects. If it had belonged to another order, such as the Benedictines or Franciscans, about whom a great deal is already known, it probably wouldn’t have been as monumental a find.”