Getty: New Project Launches to Identify, Protect, and Celebrate L.A.’s Black Heritage

Getty: New Project Launches to Identify, Protect, and Celebrate L.A.’s Black Heritage. “Despite comprehensive efforts over the years to record Los Angeles’s historic places, the city’s historic designation programs do not yet reflect the depth and breadth of African American history. Just over three percent of the city’s 1,200 designated local landmarks are linked to African American heritage. Over the next three years, the project will work with local communities and cultural institutions to more fully recognize and understand African American experiences in Los Angeles. The work aims to identify and help preserve the places that best represent these stories and work with communities to develop creative approaches that meet their own aims for placemaking, identity, and empowerment.”

Ahram Online: Online catalogue underway of 29,000 of Petrie’s archaeological finds in Egypt

Ahram Online: Online catalogue underway of 29,000 of Petrie’s archaeological finds in Egypt. “When British Egyptologist Flinders Petrie came to Egypt in 1883 he explored several archaeological sites and revealed some of the country’s ancient history. According to Egyptian law at the time, archaeological dig sponsors had full rights to half of finds, while Egypt retained the other half. Half a century after Petrie’s death, the British Museum in London started cataloguing some of the artefacts he unearthed in Egypt, especially those in possession of the 60 museums involved in sponsoring Petrie’s excavation missions. The exciting news is that early this month they began preparing to catalogue them in an online searchable database format.”

New York Times: 5 Art Accounts to Follow on Instagram Now

New York Times: 5 Art Accounts to Follow on Instagram Now. “My other great cultural love, alongside visual art, is comics. I think it’s because the form combines writing and pictures, the two media to which I’ve devoted my career. Whether it’s a comic or just a meme, I find it immensely satisfying and kinetic when images and words are brought together in such a way to add up to something greater than the sum of those parts. That something is the theme of my picks this month.”

Washington Post: Corporations are working with social media influencers to cancel-proof their racial justice initiatives

Washington Post: Corporations are working with social media influencers to cancel-proof their racial justice initiatives. “Advocating for racial allyship is not something corporate America has traditionally embraced. But the multiracial protests against police brutality last year prompted many companies to examine their role in combating systemic racism and pushing White Americans to reflect on their understanding of race and privilege — all while trying to increase market share. With every new well-meaning — or opportunistic, depending on the details — effort comes the potential for public and painful missteps.”

Politico: Facebook’s ‘supreme court’ struggles to set global free speech rules

Politico: Facebook’s ‘supreme court’ struggles to set global free speech rules. “Roughly two months since a group of outside experts started ruling on what people could post on Facebook, cracks in the so-called Oversight Board are already starting to show. So far, the independent body of human rights experts, free speech supporters and legal scholars that rules on what content Facebook must take down or put back up has reversed the social media giant’s decisions in four out of its first five cases.”

Mashable: How to use Google Maps to help the homeless

Mashable: How to use Google Maps to help the homeless. “Ashley Sundquist uses Google Maps as more than a way to get around. She’s turning it into an invaluable resource for people experiencing homelessness in her community. Sundquist has a rapport with a few homeless community members in Santa Monica, where she lives. Connecting with this community is a habit she’s long cultivated wherever she lives, whether in Los Angeles or the many East Coast cities she once called home. In January 2020, she was chatting with one of them, a man named Joe who often hung out in front of a local library. After Sundquist asked him how she could help out, he explained that, while he knew there were resources for homeless people in the community, he had trouble finding them. He needed a map.”

Robservations: Media Burn wins grant to launch Guerrilla Television Network (Robert Feder)

Robert Feder: Robservations: Media Burn wins grant to launch Guerrilla Television Network. “Chicago’s Media Burn Independent Video Archive has received a $459,150 grant from the Council on Library Resources to collaborate with the University of Chicago on digitizing hundreds of previously unseen videotapes from the 1970s. In addition to Media Burn’s content, the new Guerrilla Television Network will include work from Appalshop, Community TV Network, Experimental TV Center, Kartemquin Films and New Orleans Video Access Center.”

University of Dayton: University of Dayton faculty develop courses, digital archive to preserve Paul Laurence Dunbar’s legacy with $150K grant from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

University of Dayton: University of Dayton faculty develop courses, digital archive to preserve Paul Laurence Dunbar’s legacy with $150K grant from Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. “The two-year, $150,000 Mellon Foundation grant provides funding for building the digital Dunbar Library and Archive, which will make hundreds of Dunbar-related documents artifacts freely available online. It also provides funding for faculty who want to integrate Dunbar into their courses and for students to participate in Dunbar-related research experiences. In addition, the grant provides funding for two organizational partners, Saint Louis University’s Center for Digital Humanities and Ohio History Connection.”

Reform Austin News: Gov. Greg Abbott Publicly Slammed Facebook. Privately, He’s Courting the Social Media Giant to Build a Second Data Center in Texas.

Reform Austin News: Gov. Greg Abbott Publicly Slammed Facebook. Privately, He’s Courting the Social Media Giant to Build a Second Data Center in Texas.. “Last month, Gov. Greg Abbott blasted the actions of Facebook as ‘un-American [and] un-Texan,’ accusing it and other social media giants of spearheading a ‘dangerous movement to silence conservative voices.’… At the same time, his office was working quietly with the company with the hope that it will soon build a second data center in the state, according to documents provided to The Texas Tribune by the Tech Transparency Project, a technology research arm of the nonprofit watchdog group Campaign for Accountability.”

The New Republic: How a Bunch of Revolutionary War Reenactors Got Caught Up in Facebook’s Purge of Militia Groups

The New Republic: How a Bunch of Revolutionary War Reenactors Got Caught Up in Facebook’s Purge of Militia Groups. “[Rory] Nolan belongs to historical reenactment groups that sometimes dramatize Revolutionary War-era militias (you can begin to see the problem), and he manages the Facebook and Instagram pages for several of them. He tried to establish new accounts under new email addresses, but they didn’t last long before getting swept up in the same moderation process. Again, they were banned with no possibility of appeal. And like that, Nolan’s social media presence—and much of his social life—quietly winked out of existence.”

Las Cruces Sun News: New Mexico State Police’s first TikTok video goes viral

Las Cruces Sun News: New Mexico State Police’s first TikTok video goes viral. “About a month ago, the New Mexico State Police started a TikTok account. Last week, the agency debuted its first video, which is of a female officer getting ready for work. The video of Byanca Castro, a patrol officer based out Las Vegas, N.M., has been viewed more than 400,000 times.”