Google Indexing More Tweets, But Still A Tiny Minority

Google is indexing a LOT more tweets, but it’s still nowhere near the number being produced. “From February to June, Stone Temple found a 466% increase in Tweets indexed within the first seven days. In February, just 0.6% of Tweets were indexed and last month that number shot to 3.4%. While these increases are promising, there is still more than 96% of Tweets that aren’t indexed.”

Is Facebook Going To Get Into Music Videos?

Is Facebook going to get into music videos? This is a straight shot at YouTube. “YouTube pays the labels for showing getting to show their music videos, which often run after pre-roll ads. Still, some record executives think YouTube should pay them more because not only is it getting to earn money from showing the videos, it’s a free music streaming option that might convince some listeners they don’t need to pay for services like Spotify or Apple Music. So to seduce the labels, The New York Times says Facebook is offering better payouts in exchange for music videos.”

Ellen Pao Resigns As Reddit Interim CEO

Interim CEO of Reddit, Ellen Pao, has resigned. “Pao, 45, announced her decision to step down in a post published to Reddit on Friday afternoon. She blamed her departure on a disagreement with the site’s board of directors, not the mounting criticism she’d faced from users and moderators…. But the ouster was seen as a swift and sweeping victory for the close-knit community of Redditors, who quickly took to the online community to express their glee at forcing such a big decision at the San Francisco company.” So here’s the question: is there ever going to be a CEO that those Redditors can agree on? One who will both be able to run Reddit as a sustainable business and align with those editors’ philosophy? My guess would be no.

Will Twitter Kill the Political “Spin Room”?

Is Twitter going to end the tradition of the “spin room”? “…with new capabilities to upload video directly to Twitter and the live-stream app Periscope, the candidates can post their own post-debate analysis instantly. That means that instead of flooding the debate press room with paper statements about the opponents’ flubs or speaking into a bouquet of microphones in the corner of the debate hall, the candidate can just promote their views in a tweet targeted to the audience that is most closely watching the debate.”

LA Times Hires Reporter to Cover Black Twitter

The LA Times has hired a reporter to cover Black Twitter – that is to say, the culture of people of color and how that culture uses Twitter. “Dexter Thomas joins us today to cover Black Twitter (which really is so much more complicated than that). He will work closely with the newsroom and #EmergingUS to find communities online (Black Medium to Latino Tumblr to Line in Japan) and both create stories with and pull stories from those worlds. Dexter is from San Bernardino and is a doctoral candidate in East Asian studies at Cornell University. He has taught media studies and Japanese and is writing a book about Japanese hip-hop.” I’m going to use this story as a promotion excuse: if you have any interest in animation or voice acting at all, please do yourself a favor and follow @kharypayton on Twitter. He is a wonderful actor and doesn’t […]

Gathering Up Those Trippy Deep Dreams

I have kind of nerd crush on Deep Dreaming, Google’s neural AI that generates psychedelic images. I find the images and videos mostly fascinating, occasionally disturbing. There’s just something about them that’s so otherworldly and yet, so… familiar. Right? (Or does nobody else feel that way and I have just admitted to being a huge weirdo?) Anyway, many efforts are underway to gather these images up and share them.

Next Google Glass May Be Enterprise-Focused

It looks like the next iteration of Google Glass will be focused on the enterprise. “We told you yesterday about a new device that passed through the FCC—codenamed GG1—and many have speculated that it’s the next generation of the Google Glass hardware. While it’s often suggested that the device is soon going to get some iterative Explorer Edition overhaul and see its first official consumer launch, it’s much more probable that Google is first going to push this hardware toward the one place it has seen success: the enterprise market.” Google Glass for vertical markets is what I’ve been saying the whole time. Personally I would love to get my mittens on one of these for some of the work I do in the warehouse.

WSJ Early Review on Project Fi: Meh

The Wall Street Journal has an early review of Google’s Project Fi. They seem pretty meh about it. “Dead simple to set up and use, its rates start at $30 a month. It could save you some money if you accept some big limitations. It only works with one phone, for starters. The Nexus 6, built by Motorola in collaboration with Google, is a speedy smartphone with a gorgeous display and the best, most unaltered version of Android you can find. But it has a middling camera and its 6-inch display makes it massive to hold. If Project Fi’s SIM cards worked in phones from Samsung, HTC—dare I say, Apple?—it’d be easier to recommend.”

Gigablast Hooks Up With the Internet Archive

Hey hey hey! Gigablast has hooked up with the Internet Archive (PRESS RELEASE). “Shortly after releasing its web search engine as open source and available for free download, Gigablast, Inc. has inked a deal with the Internet Archive. Gigablast has agreed to provide search for the archive’s 400+ billion web documents. After conducting tests, the Internet Archive found that its users prefer the quality of Gigablast’s search results over the leading open source search engine solutions.”

The Guardian on Preserving and Digitizing Newspapers

From The Guardian: a fascinating story technology, old newspapers, and the race for preservation.. “In the dark void of the National Newspaper Building, the robots are afoot. Towering 20 metres high and stretching far into the distance is an imposing expanse of racks, heaving with trays bearing volume upon volume of newspapers, laid flat and strapped between metal sheets. Suddenly, an enormous autonomous crane zooms forwards, stops abruptly and, with a hydraulic gasp, shoots out an arm. Lifting a large metal tray off the scaffold, it deposits it on a conveyor belt and races into the dark. One of three poised for action, it lurks in the gloom, awaiting a command – robots, after all, don’t need the lights on. The tray and its heavy load are whisked away, making a swift right angle at a turntable, and exit through an airlock. A driverless shuttle car then speeds it to […]