UC Berkeley: Inside Rainbow Sign, a vibrant hub for black cultural arts

UC Berkeley: Inside Rainbow Sign, a vibrant hub for black cultural arts. “From the outside, Rainbow Sign didn’t look like much. Housed in a modest building — previously a mortuary — it sat on the corner of Grove (now MLK Jr. Way) and Derby in Berkeley, a quiet, beige house with a tasteful, arched doorway. But on the inside was a vibrant black cultural arts center — a 1970s Bay Area hub for black art, music, cinema, literature, education and civic gathering — that drew cultural icons from across the country, from Maya Angelou and James Baldwin to Huey Newton and Nina Simone.”

Pilipinas Popcorn: Online Martial Law Museum Aims To Educate The Youth On Philippine History

Pilipinas Popcorn: Online Martial Law Museum Aims To Educate The Youth On Philippine History. “A few days before the commemoration of martial law in the Philippine, the Ateneo de Manila University launched its online Martial Law Museum … which aims to teach the public, especially the youth about these ‘dark days’ in the country’s history. A CNN Philippines report describes the site as a ‘retelling of history through art with visual timelines, short films, poems, and artwork,’ a collaborative work of history scholars, artists, and students.”

State Library of New South Wales Australia: The Lone Hand

State Library of New South Wales Australia: The Lone Hand. “The Lone Hand (1907-1921), a sister publication to the famous Bulletin (1880-2008), has been digitised and made available through Trove. Modelled on the London Strand and founded by J.F. Archibald and Frank Fox, The Lone Hand was given the title originally preferred for the Bulletin itself. It was a monthly magazine of literature and poetry, with illustrations by significant Australian artists of the time. It was edited by Frank Fox (1907-09), A.H. Adams (1909-11), Bertram Stevens (1912-19) and Walter Jago (1919-21). Though Archibald set the magazine up, he never took a substantial editorial role.”

9 News: Interactive map shows distracted driving grades near schools

9 News: Interactive map shows distracted driving grades near schools. “A new tool allows parents to find out how safe the roads surrounding their neighborhood schools are due to distracted drivers. The interactive map is a kind of report card that assigns schools a letter grade and offers browsers an idea of how frequently drivers are using their phones near a school.” Note that while I saw data for all states, when I zoomed down to state level some counties were missing.

TechCrunch: Google brings its resources for founders and startups to a single site

TechCrunch: Google brings its resources for founders and startups to a single site. “Google launched ‘Startup with Google’ today, a new site that brings together all the company’s resources for founders and their startups. As the name implies, the focus here is on Google’s own tools, services and initiatives (think everything from Firebase and Android Studio to Analytics and Google’s various cloud security tools), but the site also highlights accelerators and events sponsored by Google but run by third parties. In addition, the new site also showcases Google’s network of Campus coworking spaces and its Launchpad accelerator programs.”

Israel National News: Epic quest to document ‘miracle’ of Hebrew language

New-to-me: Israel National News: Epic quest to document ‘miracle’ of Hebrew language. “Called the Historical Dictionary Project at Israel’s Academy of the Hebrew Language, it will serve as an invaluable resource for scholars, writers and linguists. But it will also act as an anchor for Hebrew, the ancient language revived in spoken form in the 19th century after some 1,700 years. Work completed so far is already available to the public online.” More information about the project is available at http://en.hebrew-academy.org.il/historical-dictionary-project/ .

TechCrunch: Videoblocks launches its stock photo service and changes its name to Storyblocks

TechCrunch: Videoblocks launches its stock photo service and changes its name to Storyblocks. “Stock imagery service Videoblocks made its name thanks to its flat-rate, unlimited video library and a marketplace that paid photographers a 100 percent commission. Over time, the service started branching out beyond video, though, and the company first announced its plans for a stock photo service earlier this year. Now — after having gathered and indexed millions of images from its first crop of photographers — the service is opening up to the public.”