PR Newswire: Airline Error Fare Search Engine Launched By CheapFlightsFinder (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Airline Error Fare Search Engine Launched By CheapFlightsFinder (PRESS RELEASE). “The new search engine works by unveiling the cheapest flight prices found from over 1200 sources then launching a search for those fares on a multitude of search engines – including Skyscanner, momondo, Dohop, KAYAK, Google Flights and more. Not only are airline error fares uncovered but also genuine time sensitive travel deals officially published by the airlines. Once you have discovered an error fare, consumers can shave even more off the price by comparing those dates on different search engines, potentially saving up to 20% more.”

Museum Crush: Women wearing the trousers – the archive of women striding across history

Museum Crush: Women wearing the trousers – the archive of women striding across history. “A new visual archive bringing together images of bloomers, knickerbockers, culottes and all manner of bifurcated or ‘divided’ garments is telling the story of trouser-wearing women with an online gallery of digital images spanning more than a century. Women in Trousers: A Visual Archive has been developed by Cardiff University’s Special Collections and Archives to provide a visual account of the complex and sometimes contradictory meanings represented by women ‘wearing the trousers’ from the 1850s to the 1960s.”

ProPublica: Here Are the White House Visitor Records the Trump Administration Didn’t Want You to See

ProPublica: Here Are the White House Visitor Records the Trump Administration Didn’t Want You to See. “The Trump White House tried to block public access to visitor logs of five federal offices working directly for the president even though they were subject to public disclosure through the Freedom of Information Act. Property of the People, a Washington-based transparency group, successfully sued the administration to release the data and provided the documents to ProPublica. You can search them below.”

Libraries and Archives Canada Puts Up Snowshoe Image Collection on Flickr

Now this is what I call a specific collection. Libraries and Archives Canada has put up a collection of snowshoe images on Flickr. That’s photos, paintings, etc. It’s less than 100 pictures but how many images of snowshoes do YOU have? From the blog post: “Traditional snowshoes are made with wooden frames and leather strips for webbing and boot bindings. Modern equivalents use metal or synthetic materials, but follow similar design characteristics to their predecessors. Early snowshoe design in North America spans the continent where regular snowfall occurs. The shapes and sizes vary dependent on the location. Snowshoes are available in round, triangular, and oval shapes, or can be very long. Each design addresses different types of snow, whether powdery, wet or icy. First Nations and Inuit communities are known for their design and use of snowshoes.”

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Acquires Extremely Rare Mesoamerican Codex

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Acquires Extremely Rare Mesoamerican Codex. “The Library of Congress has acquired the Codex Quetzalecatzin, one of the very few Mesoamerican manuscripts to survive from the 16th century. After being in private collections for more than 100 years, the codex has been digitally preserved and made available online for the first time to the general public…”

Artsy: New Website Aims to Connect Unrepresented Artists with Gallerists and Curators

Artsy: New Website Aims to Connect Unrepresented Artists with Gallerists and Curators. “Last winter, Adam Yokell was looking to expand the scope of his fledgling Brooklyn gallery. But he was hard-pressed to find emerging, unrepresented artists outside of New York—and he was intent on developing a diverse and expansive program. Then an idea hit him.” The directory is small at the moment because it’s being limited to MFAs or students in MFA programs.

Phys.org: New database catalogues plants that soak up contamination

Phys.org: New database catalogues plants that soak up contamination. “Hyperaccumulators are unusual plants that can absorb much larger amounts of metal compounds in their leaves and stems than normal plants, and they are very useful for cleaning up contaminated land. As described in a New Phytologist article, researchers have published a database that provides easier access to information on the plant world’s hyperaccumulators.”