Georgia Digital Archive Adds Georgia Folklore Collection

The Georgia Digital Library has added the Georgia Folklore Collection. “The Georgia Folklore Collection consists primarily of field recordings made by Art Rosenbaum donated to the University of Georgia Libraries Media Archives in 1987. The collection also contains associated collections of sound and video recordings from around Georgia, including those made between 1955 and 1983 by volunteers from the Georgia Folklore Society. Some of the artists represented in the collection include the Tanner family, Reverend Howard Finster, the McIntosh County Shouters, Doodle Thrower and the Golden River Grass, Neal Pattman, Joe Rakestraw, Jake Staggers, the Eller brothers, Doc and Lucy Barnes, Nathaniel and Fleeta Mitchell, R. A. Miller, W. Guy Bruce, Precious Bryant, and many more.”

Zooniverse Launches Season Spotter

Zooniverse has started a new project: Season Spotter. “Season Spotter is asking volunteers to help identify changes in plants, shrubs, and trees over the seasons, so we can better understand the impact of climate change on vegetation. The project’s images are of landscapes, taken by more than 200 elevated automatic cameras from across North America, and include forests, grasslands, wetlands, dry shrubland, and tundra. It is a collaboration between Harvard University, the U.S. National Ecological Observatory Network, and the Zooniverse.”

Universities of Jordan Launching Digital Learning Platform

The universities of Jordan are launching a digital learning platform. “Jordan’s public universities are aiming to increase their Internet presence through a new online platform that will pool lectures, examinations, and lesson plans. The Jordan Universities Network (JUNet), in partnership with Microsoft Jordan, will launch the Jordan Open Courseware Platform—www.elearning.edu.jo —in the autumn.”

Shakespeare Tool Lets You Get Scholarship Line-by-Line

This is one of those “new to me” resources; don’t know how long it’s been around. Nice stuff, though: a JSTOR project that lets you get Shakespeare scholarship line by line. “Understanding Shakespeare is a collaborative project between JSTOR Labs and the Folger Shakespeare Library . It’s a research tool that allows students, educators and scholars to use the text of Shakespeare’s plays to quickly navigate into the scholarship written about them—line by line. Users simply click next to any line of text in a play and relevant articles from the JSTOR archive immediately load.”

McGill University Uploading Student Publications to Internet Archives

McGill University has a bunch of student publications up at the Internet Archive. “Last winter we were able to digitize over 50 rolls of microfilm containing over 9,000 issues of the McGill Daily. Starting with their very first issue from October 2nd, 1911 we are going to be spending the summer uploading just over 9,000 issues dating to 2001 to our new Internet Archive collection of McGill Student Publications. Check back often during the summer as we’ll be uploading a few hundred issues each day.”

New, Free Online Tool for Genetic Research Released

A new, free online genetic research tool is now available. “Technology rapidly is advancing the study of genetics and the search for causes of major diseases. Analysis of genomic sequences that once took days or months now can be performed in a matter of hours. Yet, for most genetic scientists, the lack of access to computer servers and programs capable of quickly handling vast amounts of data can hinder genetic advancements. Now, a group of scientists at theUniversity of Missouri has introduced a game changer in the world of biological research. The online, free service, RNAMiner, has been developed to handle large data sets which could lead to faster results in the study of plant and animal genomics…. The website was created to be user-friendly and allows users to upload data, analyze it through as many as five steps against the complete genomes of five species: human, mouse, Drosophila melanogaster […]

California Historical Society and Historypin on 1915 World’s Fair

The California Historical Society and Historypin are trying to crowdsource images and stories from the 1915 World’s Fair (PRESS RELEASE). “The California Historical Society and Historypin are inviting 1915 World’s Fair enthusiasts and the public to share their personal photographs and memorabilia from the Panama Pacific International Exposition (PPIE) for an online exhibit aimed at creating one of the largest virtual grassroots collections of stories, family memories and images from the World’s Fair.” There’s already a lot available if you visit https://www.historypin.org/en/explore/panama-pacific-international-exposition/ .

National Library of Medicine Digitizes Early English Books

The National Library of Medicine has digitized early English books. “The National Library of Medicine (NLM) announces the release through its Digital Collections of nearly 200 items uniquely held by the NLM and printed in the English-speaking world from 1552 to 1800.” One of the items digitized is one of the first books on the issue of depression — from 1660!

The FEC Has a new API

The FEC has a new API, and The Sunlight Foundation gives us a breakdown. “Big news in the campaign finance world: The Federal Election Commission (FEC) is taking a huge step forward by making data accessible through a modern API. With the help of a team of intrepid 18F developers, the FEC is rethinking both its website and its data offerings to better serve its mission of educating the public with real-time disclosure of campaign finance information. It’s part of the larger OpenFEC project, and we think it’s a very encouraging sign that this collaboration is going to improve access to a crucial information resource. This is a beta release, but we’re really excited to see what’s been accomplished so far. What follows is meant as both an introduction to what’s available through this new resource and a critique of what’s working well, and the changes Sunlight would like to […]

New Archive of Illuminated Manuscripts

Leeds University Library has launched a new online resource for illuminated manuscripts. “The resource showcases illumination found in twenty-seven medieval manuscripts held in the collections. It builds on digitisation and cataloguing work undertaken in 2008. Dr Katja Monier (who worked on the original project) has carried out extensive research into the collections. Dr. Monier has enhanced the online resource with detailed contextual information about the origins of specific manuscripts.” I have seen illuminated manuscript sites before but never one so seriously annotated.

New CSE for Open Access Law Journals

Annette Demers has created a new Google Custom search for open access law journals. The blog post with the announcement notes a few other CSEs she’s created which you might find useful. Use the second link to try the CSE – the first one at the top of the blog post apparently leads to the wrong place.

Inscriptions from Iraq Being Saved into Online Database

Inscriptions from cultural heritage sites in Iraq are are being saved into an online database. “Between 1997 and 2014, [Amir] Harrak made several trips to cultural heritage sites throughout Iraq, cleaning and recording engraved inscriptions that date between the seventh and 20th centuries. During a trip to Mosul in 2014, he recorded inscriptions and art at the monastery of Mar Behnam. Islamic State fighters captured the city and monastery in June 2014, but Harrak managed to leave before they arrived. Since then, the militant grouphas destroyed the monastery along with many sites in Mosul and other parts of Iraq…. Because of this destruction, the photographs he took during these trips (about 700 in total) have become scientifically irreplaceable. He’s now working with the Canadian Centre for Epigraphic Documents (CCED) to create an online database of all the inscriptions, which will allow new research on them and, despite the destruction, allow […]

HHS Launches Site of Resources for Health During Emergencies

The US Department of Health and Human Services has launched an online compendium of resources for mitigating the health impacts of emergencies. “The compendium offers an easy-to-navigate, comprehensive, web-based repository of HHS products, services and capabilities available to state, state, tribal, territorial, and local agencies before, during, and after public health and medical incidents. The information spans 24 categories, and each category showcases the relevant disaster resources available from HHS and partner agencies, a brief description of each resource and information on accessing each one.” Categories include Patient Movement, Mass Care, Vector Control, and Blood Products and Services.

Charles A Farrell Photo Collection on Flickr

The North Carolina Archives have put the Charles A. Farrell Photo Collection on Flickr. “The bulk of the photographs in the collection were taken by Charles A. Farrell between 1925 and 1940 in association with his work as a commercial photographer in Greensboro where he owned and operated the Art Shop for many years. Farrell also took a significant number of photographs of coastal North Carolina in the late 1930s.” As a North Carolinian, I am probably slightly biased, but these pictures are beautiful. He even manages to make group shots look interesting. You know, those class or organization shots where people line up in three rows and stare at the camera. There are about 3000 photos here.