California Historical Society and Historypin on 1915 World’s Fair

The California Historical Society and Historypin are trying to crowdsource images and stories from the 1915 World’s Fair (PRESS RELEASE). “The California Historical Society and Historypin are inviting 1915 World’s Fair enthusiasts and the public to share their personal photographs and memorabilia from the Panama Pacific International Exposition (PPIE) for an online exhibit aimed at creating one of the largest virtual grassroots collections of stories, family memories and images from the World’s Fair.” There’s already a lot available if you visit https://www.historypin.org/en/explore/panama-pacific-international-exposition/ .

National Library of Medicine Digitizes Early English Books

The National Library of Medicine has digitized early English books. “The National Library of Medicine (NLM) announces the release through its Digital Collections of nearly 200 items uniquely held by the NLM and printed in the English-speaking world from 1552 to 1800.” One of the items digitized is one of the first books on the issue of depression — from 1660!

The FEC Has a new API

The FEC has a new API, and The Sunlight Foundation gives us a breakdown. “Big news in the campaign finance world: The Federal Election Commission (FEC) is taking a huge step forward by making data accessible through a modern API. With the help of a team of intrepid 18F developers, the FEC is rethinking both its website and its data offerings to better serve its mission of educating the public with real-time disclosure of campaign finance information. It’s part of the larger OpenFEC project, and we think it’s a very encouraging sign that this collaboration is going to improve access to a crucial information resource. This is a beta release, but we’re really excited to see what’s been accomplished so far. What follows is meant as both an introduction to what’s available through this new resource and a critique of what’s working well, and the changes Sunlight would like to […]

New Archive of Illuminated Manuscripts

Leeds University Library has launched a new online resource for illuminated manuscripts. “The resource showcases illumination found in twenty-seven medieval manuscripts held in the collections. It builds on digitisation and cataloguing work undertaken in 2008. Dr Katja Monier (who worked on the original project) has carried out extensive research into the collections. Dr. Monier has enhanced the online resource with detailed contextual information about the origins of specific manuscripts.” I have seen illuminated manuscript sites before but never one so seriously annotated.

New CSE for Open Access Law Journals

Annette Demers has created a new Google Custom search for open access law journals. The blog post with the announcement notes a few other CSEs she’s created which you might find useful. Use the second link to try the CSE – the first one at the top of the blog post apparently leads to the wrong place.

Inscriptions from Iraq Being Saved into Online Database

Inscriptions from cultural heritage sites in Iraq are are being saved into an online database. “Between 1997 and 2014, [Amir] Harrak made several trips to cultural heritage sites throughout Iraq, cleaning and recording engraved inscriptions that date between the seventh and 20th centuries. During a trip to Mosul in 2014, he recorded inscriptions and art at the monastery of Mar Behnam. Islamic State fighters captured the city and monastery in June 2014, but Harrak managed to leave before they arrived. Since then, the militant grouphas destroyed the monastery along with many sites in Mosul and other parts of Iraq…. Because of this destruction, the photographs he took during these trips (about 700 in total) have become scientifically irreplaceable. He’s now working with the Canadian Centre for Epigraphic Documents (CCED) to create an online database of all the inscriptions, which will allow new research on them and, despite the destruction, allow […]

HHS Launches Site of Resources for Health During Emergencies

The US Department of Health and Human Services has launched an online compendium of resources for mitigating the health impacts of emergencies. “The compendium offers an easy-to-navigate, comprehensive, web-based repository of HHS products, services and capabilities available to state, state, tribal, territorial, and local agencies before, during, and after public health and medical incidents. The information spans 24 categories, and each category showcases the relevant disaster resources available from HHS and partner agencies, a brief description of each resource and information on accessing each one.” Categories include Patient Movement, Mass Care, Vector Control, and Blood Products and Services.

Charles A Farrell Photo Collection on Flickr

The North Carolina Archives have put the Charles A. Farrell Photo Collection on Flickr. “The bulk of the photographs in the collection were taken by Charles A. Farrell between 1925 and 1940 in association with his work as a commercial photographer in Greensboro where he owned and operated the Art Shop for many years. Farrell also took a significant number of photographs of coastal North Carolina in the late 1930s.” As a North Carolinian, I am probably slightly biased, but these pictures are beautiful. He even manages to make group shots look interesting. You know, those class or organization shots where people line up in three rows and stare at the camera. There are about 3000 photos here.

World War I Merchant Seamen History Now Online

A huge amount of information on World War I Merchant Seamen is now online. “The stories of 750,000 First World War merchant seamen and 39,000 voyages can be read online for the first time following the completion of a four-year-long project. Organised by The National Maritime Museum and The National Archives as part of their First World War commemorations, the 1915 Crew List Project has transcribed the entire crew lists of the Merchant Navy from 1915. “

State of NJ to Publish Teacher Ratings in Database

The state of New Jersey is going to publish a database of teacher ratings, but not ratings for specific teachers. “The data, which will be released next week, will allow parents to see how many teachers in a school received each of the four possible ratings. It will not include performance ratings for specific teachers, the state said.”

Uganda Starts Gender-Based Violence Database

The government of Uganda has started a gender-based violence database. “NGBVD is an online management information system that is designed to collect, store and analyze Gender Based Violence (GBV) data in both humanitarian and non-humanitarian settings. The web based software, according the Ministry for Gender, Labour and Social Development will also make GBV incident reporting and response services more evidence based.”

Collection of French Globes to Be Digitized by Tokyo Company

A Tokyo company is going to digitize a collection of historic globes from France and put them online. “Dai Nippon Printing Co. will digitally copy 55 of the historic terrestrial and celestial globes in the National Library of France’s collection so that people can view them on screen. The globes were handcrafted in Europe and the Middle East from the 11th to the 19th centuries, are extremely valuable, and include a 15th-century copy of the world’s oldest terrestrial globe.”

Font Access in Google Docs

Want to play with a bunch of in Google Docs? there’s an add-on for that. “Available as a free add-on via Google Docs, Extensis Fonts provides a panel where you can browse, preview and apply fonts directly from within Google documents.”

Digital Archive of Baltimore Protests Under Construction

Universities are teaming up to create a digital archive of the Baltimore protests. “To date more than 1,200 items have been donated to the archive including photographs, videos, and eyewitness oral histories. A website has been set up by Denise Meringolo, an associate professor of history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County to display the historical archive.”