Mashable: 13 of our favorite deepfakes that’ll seriously mess with your brain

Mashable: 13 of our favorite deepfakes that’ll seriously mess with your brain. “In a rudimentary sense, deepfakes can be a face-swap of sorts, but really it’s more complex. It makes something that wasn’t — swapping in a person for another, changing what they say, shapeshifting reality. That’s why it can be scary. Imagine the damage that could be done making someone say something they did not. But again… they can also be kind of fun. That in mind, we’ve collected some of our favorite amateur deepfake videos but, you know, not the kind that threaten democracy.”

The Star: M’sian music fan deejays with wind-up gramophone, playing century-old recordings

The Star: M’sian music fan deejays with wind-up gramophone, playing century-old recordings. “[Caleb] Goh has a ‘very small’ collection of over 500 shellac records, comprising mostly swing music from the 1920s. He notes that unlike vinyl, shellac records only hold two songs each (one song per side) so you need a sizeable collection to not end up having to listen to the same songs again and again. The oldest one in his possession is an American recording from 1898, but the one he considers the rarest and most interesting is a Gaisberg recording of a Japanese song from 1903.”

Emulsive: One Giant Leap… Remastering High-resolution Images Of NASA’s Race To The Moon

Emulsive: One Giant Leap… Remastering High-resolution Images Of NASA’s Race To The Moon. “Historically, most of the photographs presented in the media have been based on decades-old, low-resolution scans/digitisation. This has been remedied somewhat by efforts to create high-resolution scans of the negatives, although many of the ~35,000 frames from NASA’s Apollo archive at the Johnson Space Center still need work to bring out the detail we all know is stored in those amazing Kodak negatives and slides. This is where Andy Saunders comes in. Over the past few years, Andy has worked tirelessly to remaster both high- and low-resolution scans from NASA’s archive, bringing many 16mm, 35mm and 70mm slides and negatives from the Apollo missions into sharp relief for the first time.” The article called Mr. Saunders’ work “astounding” and that ain’t the half of it.

Lifehacker: Scream Into Your Phone and Have it Played on a Speaker in Iceland

Lifehacker: Scream Into Your Phone and Have it Played on a Speaker in Iceland. “Have you been so angry, frustrated and/or stressed lately that you just want to scream as long as you can into the void? Us, too. But as it turns out, we now have the option of having our blood-curdling wails echo throughout the land—specifically, Iceland. The small island country, and place where you’ve been meaning to visit for years but something keeps coming up, is sacrificing its soundscape for the greater good.”

The Verge: Librarians Turned Google Forms Into The Unlikely Platform For Virtual Escape Rooms

The Verge: Librarians Turned Google Forms Into The Unlikely Platform For Virtual Escape Rooms. “On the day the Peters Township Public Library in McMurray, Pennsylvania, was supposed to unveil a superhero-themed escape room, the library had to close its doors due to the coronavirus pandemic. With no physical location to work with, librarian Sydney Krawiec started to devise an alternative: a digital escape room created in Google Forms.”

InPark Magazine: New website offers tool for attraction designers based on work of industry legend Harrison ‘Buzz’ Price

A little outside my usual, but I like it; this site reminds me of some of the “expert in a box” systems you’d hear about from Tom Peters. InPark Magazine: New website offers tool for attraction designers based on work of industry legend Harrison ‘Buzz’ Price. “The site is essentially a question and answer session with Buzz Price. First, he asks visitors to the web site a few questions about their potential project, such as desired attendance, seasonality, attraction mix, etc. Then, after sharing calculations on peak month, peak week and design day attendance, people can ask Buzz Price questions…”

The Next Web: This tiny game runs directly in your browser’s title bar — and it’s kinda fun

The Next Web: This tiny game runs directly in your browser’s title bar — and it’s kinda fun. “I was absolutely mind-blown when I first discovered the not-so-hidden Chrome dinosaur game. I’ll never forget that moment, because I spent the next several hours playing it — without even taking a break. I just loved how simple and unassuming it was. But now I’ve found something even simpler and more unassuming. Enter TitleRun, a micro-game that exists entirely in your browser‘s title bar (not to be confused with the URL bar, which is the mistake I first made).”

Screen Rant: How To Find Made Up Words With Meaningless Definitions

Screen Rant: How To Find Made Up Words With Meaningless Definitions . “If you don’t know what Tendercake means then it is a cake or filling typically made with the flattened piece of fruit and cake eaten dry, according to an AI web tool that’s specifically designed to make up words. The website where the AI is located doesn’t only make up words, but also provides context through meaningless definitions and examples that makes them sound authentic. This is the just the latest example of how artificial intelligence is being used for new and novel purposes.”

The Tab: This is how to do that hilarious AI meme generator that everyone is doing on Twitter

The Tab: This is how to do that hilarious AI meme generator that everyone is doing on Twitter. “The generator, called This Meme Does Not Exist, is created by a site called site is called imgflip, who say on their site that the memes are generated by ‘a deep artificial neural network. Nothing about the text generation is hardcoded, except that the maximum text length is limited for sanity. The model uses character-level prediction, so you can specify prefix text of one or more characters to influence the text generated.'”

Mashable: Museum curators show off their creepiest stuff, and we’re shuddering

Mashable: Museum curators show off their creepiest stuff, and we’re shuddering. “The world can be a freaky place. The world of museum curators, however, is apparently downright terrifying. That much was made clear Friday when whoever had control of the Yorkshire Museum’s Twitter account kicked off a creepy-curator challenge. The UK museum claims to house ‘some of Britain’s finest archaeological treasures,’ but this #CURATORBATTLE called for something else.”

Boing Boing: This cool online radio station lets you listen to popular songs from any decade and country from 1900 to now

Boing Boing: This cool online radio station lets you listen to popular songs from any decade and country from 1900 to now. “When you go to Radiooooo you see a map of the world. You click on any country on the map, and select a decade beginning with 1900. It will start playing music from that country and decade.” I tried United States / 1940s and the site started playing a lovely little groove called “Hot Dog” by Chris Powell & The Five Blue Flames.

GamesRadar: Always check behind waterfalls for secrets in video games, or just follow this new Twitter account that does it for you

GamesRadar: Always check behind waterfalls for secrets in video games, or just follow this new Twitter account that does it for you. “There’s a new Twitter account dedicated to looking behind waterfalls in video games and letting you know if there’s anything there. It’s a valuable service to anyone who’s spotted a waterfall way off in the distance, sidelined their mission to find and check behind it, only to discover that it’s actually just an honest waterfall.”

Music Radar: It turns out that Google Wear OS smartwatches contain a secret drum machine

Music Radar: It turns out that Google Wear OS smartwatches contain a secret drum machine. “You probably didn’t buy your smartwatch planning to make music on it – particularly, it has to be said, a Google-powered smartwatch – but it turns out that high-tech timepieces that run the company’s Wear OS contain a hidden drum machine.”

Michigan State University: New resource helps food pantry staff serve clients with diabetes

Outside my wheelhouse, sharing anyway. Michigan State University: New resource helps food pantry staff serve clients with diabetes. “On average, 33% of all households that use food pantries have at least one family member with diabetes. Unfortunately, these factors can often lead to a cycle of poor health outcomes — food insecurity is more common among households with a person living with diabetes, yet food insecurity is a risk factor for developing diabetes. To help fight this problem, MSU Extension has created a free online learning module called Navigating the Food Pantry with Diabetes. This course helps food pantry staff better serve clients who are managing diabetes.”

Internet Archive: The Books Beloved by David Bowie

Internet Archive: The Books Beloved by David Bowie. “…in 2013, David Bowie published a list of his 100 favorite reads. (Republished here on the DavidBowie.com site, now only accessible through the Wayback Machine.) We are happy to share them with you in this Internet Archive Collection ‘David Bowie’s Favorite Books’–84 of which are readily available for free through the Internet Archive.”