Michael Hoffman: Could a Podcast Make Itself?

Michael Hoffman: Could a Podcast Make Itself?. “I run a daily podcast called The Weather in Brooklyn. Every morning, you can expect a new episode to appear in its feed. There’s an audio logo at the beginning, then some music starts playing, and the host begins to speak. The host presents the weather forecast for that day in Brooklyn, reads the credits, and signs off. The music fades out, and the episode ends. But the host isn’t me. It’s not a person at all. And I don’t exactly run this podcast. It’s my podcast, to be sure, but I don’t make it every day. In fact, I’m usually still half asleep when new episodes are created.”

The Verge: An interactive Doja Cat music video can introduce you to programming

The Verge: An interactive Doja Cat music video can introduce you to programming. “Girls Who Code, the nonprofit organization that aims to get more women and girls interested in the field of computer science, has debuted what it calls the ‘first ever’ codable music video. The organization partnered with Doja Cat, transforming her new music video for Woman into an interactive experience.”

CNET: Comedy Wildlife Photography Award winners highlight animals’ lighter side

CNET: Comedy Wildlife Photography Award winners highlight animals’ lighter side. “If these photos are any proof, animals have their best and worst days too. Raccoons share secrets, fish are awed by their companion’s ability to jump, a pigeon is defeated by a fallen leaf and a prairie dog faces down a bald eagle. There’s a smile for every mood in this year’s Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards winners.”

New York Intelligencer: The Defense Department May Be Getting an Office to Investigate UFOs

New York Intelligencer: The Defense Department May Be Getting an Office to Investigate UFOs. “Two years after lawmakers were ‘coming out of the woodwork’ to be briefed about Navy and Air Force pilots coming across unidentified aerial phenomena, a bipartisan group of senators led by New York Democrat Kirsten Gillibrand wants to formalize the process of learning about the unexplained sightings more commonly known as UFOs.”

Ubergizmo: 91-Year Old Grandma Creates Incredible Works Of Art Using Paint On Her Windows 7 PC

Ubergizmo: 91-Year Old Grandma Creates Incredible Works Of Art Using Paint On Her Windows 7 PC. “It is obvious that compared to more professional based tools like Adobe Illustrator, Microsoft’s Paint doesn’t even come close. However, does that mean it’s a completely useless tool? Hardly. In fact, 91-year-old grandma Concha García Zaera will undoubtedly put those hater and doubters to rest with her art pieces. According to a report from Digital Synopsis, Zaera started to use Paint about 12 years ago when her children gifted her a computer. As her husband was sick, she spent a lot of time at home taking care of him. She had initially attempted to take art classes but was unable to practice with real paint, so she took to Paint to practice.” It’s like a mashup of Grandma Moses’ clean lines and simplicity with a 1980s bright, primary-colors aesthetic and just a splash of […]

Mashable: In viral TikTok, mom uses data to visualize the workload of a new parent

Mashable: In viral TikTok, mom uses data to visualize the workload of a new parent . “Shared on her husband’s TikTok account that.data.guy, the video is a recording of a Zoom meeting Kristen Cuneo presenting to her coworkers after returning from parental leave. The TikTok jumps into the middle of the presentation, as she launches a huge data visualization behind her in the Zoom meeting. The data points, representing every key task she took on to care for her child, spin around and change shape until they’re a huge set of numbers (and time) taking up the screen. The video is only 45 seconds long, but is a succinct display of how much work it takes to be a new parent.”

Boing Boing: Fun web app for doodling inspired by its creator’s elementary school doodling “rules”

Boing Boing: Fun web app for doodling inspired by its creator’s elementary school doodling “rules” . “Boing Boing contributor and esteemed author Clive Thompson created a delightful Web app for doodling. The design of the ‘Right-Angle Doodling Machine’ was inspired by a curious set of rules that Clive followed when doodling in elementary school.”

Mother Jones: Nearly 100 Confederate Monuments Were Toppled Last Year. What Happened to Them?

Mother Jones: Nearly 100 Confederate Monuments Were Toppled Last Year. What Happened to Them?. “Earlier this year, in April, I started a five-week, 7,300-mile road trip through the South to document Confederate monuments that had been taken down since George Floyd’s death the previous spring. My goal was to create a record of an unraveling—this moment in time when long-held narratives about Southern pride and the memorialization of Civil War ‘heroes’ are literally being knocked off their pedestals. I’m photographing the spaces where the monuments once stood, as well as where they’ve ended up. I’m also pairing these photos with archival images of the monuments, sometimes commemorated on postcards, other times in state and university archives, or in the Library of Congress.”

Designing a useful textbook for an open access audience – Q and A with Filipe Campante, Federico Sturzenegger and Andrés Velasco, authors of Advanced Macroeconomics: An Easy Guide (London School of Economics)

London School of Economics: Designing a useful textbook for an open access audience – Q and A with Filipe Campante, Federico Sturzenegger and Andrés Velasco, authors of Advanced Macroeconomics: An Easy Guide. “Textbooks play an important role in defining fields of research and summarising key academic ideas for a wider audience. But how do you do this for an open access audience that is potentially unlimited? We talked to Filipe Campante, Federico Sturzenegger and Andrés Velasco¸ authors of the recently published LSE Press book Advanced Macroeconomics: An Easy Guide, about how the field has changed in recent times, what makes their approach to macro-economics distinctive, and what rationales and ambitions lie behind producing an open access textbook.”

Consumer Reports: Meet NumWorks, the Modern Graphing Calculator

Consumer Reports: Meet NumWorks, the Modern Graphing Calculator. “Most of the graphing calculators in students’ backpacks are made by Texas Instruments, and they look a lot like models going back to when these gadgets were introduced in the 1980s. But as the school year gains steam, NumWorks, a calculator startup launched a few years ago, is expanding on a cult following among high school teachers, along with a slice of tech innovators who say they like the company’s consumer-friendly approach to repairs and tinkering.”

University of Toronto: From colour-changing lizards to ‘buff’ birds, U of T students create fun, science-focused trading cards

University of Toronto: From colour-changing lizards to ‘buff’ birds, U of T students create fun, science-focused trading cards . “Inspired by the Pokémon collectible trading cards of their childhood, University of Toronto biomedical communications students Shehryar (Shay) Saharan and Michie (Xingyu) Wu developed the BMC SciCard Collaborative project.”

New York Times: How Word Lists Help — or Hurt — Crossword Puzzles

New York Times: How Word Lists Help — or Hurt — Crossword Puzzles. “If we were to go by the New York Times Crossword, Lake ERIE would be the most dazzling body of water on Earth. Mining ORE would be the most lucrative business venture. According to xwordinfo.com, ERIE is the third most popular word in the New York Times Crossword. It has appeared over 1,350 times. ORE is seventh, with over 1,200 appearances. ORE and ERIE are examples of crosswordese, words that appear often in crossword puzzles but rarely in day-to-day conversation.”