CNET: This app will tell you if the local McDonald’s ice cream machine is broken

CNET: This app will tell you if the local McDonald’s ice cream machine is broken. “We all know the heartbreak of wanting nothing more than a cheap ice cream cone from McDonald’s, only to find when we get there that the machine is apparently broken. Thankfully, people will never run out of reasons to build apps, and there’s now one called mcbroken that’ll tell you whether the machine at your local McDonald’s is working.”

Mashable: New web app lets you take Game Boy Camera-style pics and pretend it’s 1998

Mashable: New web app lets you take Game Boy Camera-style pics and pretend it’s 1998. “On Saturday a coder, animator, and electronic musician by the name of maple ‘mavica’ syrup published a free web app that lets anyone take Game Boy Camera-style photos with just their browser and a webcam. It’s super fun.”

Vinyl Factory: New Record Deal Simulator website launches to help artists and labels

Vinyl Factory: New Record Deal Simulator website launches to help artists and labels. “A new website called Record Deal Simulator, designed by CreateOS, has launched. The website allows both artists and labels to calculate profits based on streams, as well as adjusting advance and distribution fees, recording and marketing costs.”

Internet: Old TV caused village broadband outages for 18 months (BBC)

Dedicated to all you cool cats and kittens who have ever had to do really weird tech troubleshooting, from the BBC: Internet: Old TV caused village broadband outages for 18 months. “The mystery of why an entire village lost its broadband every morning at 7am was solved when engineers discovered an old television was to blame. An unnamed householder in Aberhosan, Powys, was unaware the old set would emit a signal which would interfere with the entire village’s broadband. After 18 months engineers began an investigation after a cable replacement programme failed to fix the issue.”

Getty Iris: How an Artist Teamed up with Her Dog to Re-create Art

The Getty Iris: How an Artist Teamed up with Her Dog to Re-create Art. “Every weekday morning, Eliza Reinhardt and her creative partner, Finn, start their day at 7am by getting up, brewing a cup of coffee, and snuggling while they browse online galleries to find a work of art to re-create as part of the Getty Museum Challenge…. Finn is a three-year-old Australian shepherd, but he follows direction as carefully as an actor on a film set. ‘I really do think Finn takes this on as his daily task,’ Reinhardt said. ‘I say, “Finn, do you want to do a photo? You want to go take a picture?” And he’s ready to go.'”

BBC: Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2020 finalists revealed

BBC: Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2020 finalists revealed. “A fish that appears to smile, a bear giving a friendly wave from afar and a very grumpy sea turtle – this year’s finalists show animals in relatable comedy moments. The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards were founded by Paul Joynson-Hicks and Tom Sullam, both professional photographers and passionate conservationists.”

CNN: This map lets you see where your hometown was on the Earth millions of years ago

CNN: This map lets you see where your hometown was on the Earth millions of years ago. “A California paleontologist has created an interactive map that allows people to see how far their hometowns have moved over 750 million years of continental drift. The online map, designed by Ian Webster, features a range of tools that also make it easy to discover more about the Earth, such as where the first reptiles lived or when the first flower bloomed.”

CBR: James Gunn, Merriam-Webster Come to a Consensus on How to Spell ‘Asshat’

CBR: James Gunn, Merriam-Webster Come to a Consensus on How to Spell ‘Asshat’. “Writer/director James Gunn recently reached out to the internet for help with a project he’s currently writing. While he wouldn’t name the script he needed it for, Gunn asked his followers on Twitter how they prefer to spell the word ‘asshat’. He claimed that the poll settled the matter forever — and the Merriam-Webster dictionary backed him up.”

Mashable: 13 of our favorite deepfakes that’ll seriously mess with your brain

Mashable: 13 of our favorite deepfakes that’ll seriously mess with your brain. “In a rudimentary sense, deepfakes can be a face-swap of sorts, but really it’s more complex. It makes something that wasn’t — swapping in a person for another, changing what they say, shapeshifting reality. That’s why it can be scary. Imagine the damage that could be done making someone say something they did not. But again… they can also be kind of fun. That in mind, we’ve collected some of our favorite amateur deepfake videos but, you know, not the kind that threaten democracy.”

The Star: M’sian music fan deejays with wind-up gramophone, playing century-old recordings

The Star: M’sian music fan deejays with wind-up gramophone, playing century-old recordings. “[Caleb] Goh has a ‘very small’ collection of over 500 shellac records, comprising mostly swing music from the 1920s. He notes that unlike vinyl, shellac records only hold two songs each (one song per side) so you need a sizeable collection to not end up having to listen to the same songs again and again. The oldest one in his possession is an American recording from 1898, but the one he considers the rarest and most interesting is a Gaisberg recording of a Japanese song from 1903.”

Emulsive: One Giant Leap… Remastering High-resolution Images Of NASA’s Race To The Moon

Emulsive: One Giant Leap… Remastering High-resolution Images Of NASA’s Race To The Moon. “Historically, most of the photographs presented in the media have been based on decades-old, low-resolution scans/digitisation. This has been remedied somewhat by efforts to create high-resolution scans of the negatives, although many of the ~35,000 frames from NASA’s Apollo archive at the Johnson Space Center still need work to bring out the detail we all know is stored in those amazing Kodak negatives and slides. This is where Andy Saunders comes in. Over the past few years, Andy has worked tirelessly to remaster both high- and low-resolution scans from NASA’s archive, bringing many 16mm, 35mm and 70mm slides and negatives from the Apollo missions into sharp relief for the first time.” The article called Mr. Saunders’ work “astounding” and that ain’t the half of it.

Lifehacker: Scream Into Your Phone and Have it Played on a Speaker in Iceland

Lifehacker: Scream Into Your Phone and Have it Played on a Speaker in Iceland. “Have you been so angry, frustrated and/or stressed lately that you just want to scream as long as you can into the void? Us, too. But as it turns out, we now have the option of having our blood-curdling wails echo throughout the land—specifically, Iceland. The small island country, and place where you’ve been meaning to visit for years but something keeps coming up, is sacrificing its soundscape for the greater good.”

The Verge: Librarians Turned Google Forms Into The Unlikely Platform For Virtual Escape Rooms

The Verge: Librarians Turned Google Forms Into The Unlikely Platform For Virtual Escape Rooms. “On the day the Peters Township Public Library in McMurray, Pennsylvania, was supposed to unveil a superhero-themed escape room, the library had to close its doors due to the coronavirus pandemic. With no physical location to work with, librarian Sydney Krawiec started to devise an alternative: a digital escape room created in Google Forms.”

InPark Magazine: New website offers tool for attraction designers based on work of industry legend Harrison ‘Buzz’ Price

A little outside my usual, but I like it; this site reminds me of some of the “expert in a box” systems you’d hear about from Tom Peters. InPark Magazine: New website offers tool for attraction designers based on work of industry legend Harrison ‘Buzz’ Price. “The site is essentially a question and answer session with Buzz Price. First, he asks visitors to the web site a few questions about their potential project, such as desired attendance, seasonality, attraction mix, etc. Then, after sharing calculations on peak month, peak week and design day attendance, people can ask Buzz Price questions…”

The Next Web: This tiny game runs directly in your browser’s title bar — and it’s kinda fun

The Next Web: This tiny game runs directly in your browser’s title bar — and it’s kinda fun. “I was absolutely mind-blown when I first discovered the not-so-hidden Chrome dinosaur game. I’ll never forget that moment, because I spent the next several hours playing it — without even taking a break. I just loved how simple and unassuming it was. But now I’ve found something even simpler and more unassuming. Enter TitleRun, a micro-game that exists entirely in your browser‘s title bar (not to be confused with the URL bar, which is the mistake I first made).”