Listen to the call: Scientists recreate the song of a 150-year-old insect that could help rediscover its species (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Listen to the call: Scientists recreate the song of a 150-year-old insect that could help rediscover its species. “A museum specimen has been heard for the first time in 150 years after scientists digitally recreated its song. The body shape and song of Prophalangopsis obscura could help give researchers clues about where the insect might still be living after being lost for over a century.”

PSU Vanguard: The monks behind the books

PSU Vanguard: The monks behind the books. “If you’ve ever walked the stacks of Portland State’s Branford Price Miller Library, you’ve likely noticed the distinctive hard-cloth bindings on a number of books on the shelves. From academic journals to dissertations, many of the library’s specialty bookbinding needs are performed by a community of Trappist monks from the Our Lady of Guadalupe Trappist Abbey in Carlton, Oregon.”

WIRED: The Creators of ‘King’s Quest’ Are Back With a New Game

WIRED: The Creators of ‘King’s Quest’ Are Back With a New Game. “Ken and Roberta Williams are the cofounders of Sierra Online, the company behind such classic computer games as King’s Quest, Space Quest, and Quest for Glory. Their latest project, Colossal Cave: Reimagined by Roberta Williams, is a remake of the genre-defining Colossal Cave Adventure by Will Crowther and Don Woods.”

Caltech: New research “UNCOVERS” hidden objects in high resolution

Caltech: New research “UNCOVERS” hidden objects in high resolution. “The technology, developed in the laboratory of Changhuei Yang, Thomas G. Myers Professor of Electrical Engineering, Bioengineering, and Medical Engineering; and Heritage Medical Research Institute investigator, is a form of non-line-of-sight (NLOS) sensing—or sensing that detects an object of interest outside of the viewer’s line of sight. The new method, dubbed UNCOVER, does this by using nearby flat surfaces, such as walls, like a lens to clearly view the hidden object.”

Texas A&M Today: Texas A&M Team Translates Thousands Of Pages Of Math Into Braille

Texas A&M Today: Texas A&M Team Translates Thousands Of Pages Of Math Into Braille. “When Texas A&M University Mathematics Lecturer Vanessa Coffelt wanted to further accommodate coursework for students who are blind or visually impaired, the staff at Texas A&M’s Department of Disability Resources accepted the challenge. They worked closely with the Department of Mathematics to create a Braille translation — more than 2,300 pages worth.”

University of Oxford: Researchers develop new breath-driven concept set to transform access to hand prosthetics

University of Oxford: Researchers develop new breath-driven concept set to transform access to hand prosthetics. “By regulating their breathing, users power a small purpose-built Tesla turbine that can accurately control the prosthetic finger movements. The volume of air needed to power the unit can be achieved by young children and the gearing in the unit determines the speed of the grasping action. Cable and harness free, the device is lightweight and suitable for children and adolescents who are still growing. Minimal maintenance and training are needed for ease of use in comparison to other prosthetic options.”

South China Morning Post: A stunning 16th-century Chinese ‘magic mirror’ was found in a US art museum after being tucked away in storage

South China Morning Post: A stunning 16th-century Chinese ‘magic mirror’ was found in a US art museum after being tucked away in storage. “Buddhist magic mirrors, also called ‘transparent’ and ‘light-penetrating’ mirrors, were first made in China during the Han dynasty (202 BCE–220 CE) and were also a notable artefact from Japan’s Edo period (1603–1867)….When the mirror is held to light from the correct angle, the bronze reflects the light to reveal the secret image, a buddha in the case of the Cincinnati Art Museum’s relic.”

University of Central Florida: UCF Faculty Combines Harry Potter with Pharmacology Course to Improve Student Outcomes

University of Central Florida: UCF Faculty Combines Harry Potter with Pharmacology Course to Improve Student Outcomes . “Incorporating interactive games in the course has proven to enhance academic success; the number of students who earned an ‘A’ in the class improved by almost 200% in the past three years, and there has been a 73% decline in the number of non-pass students (students who earn a ‘D’ or an ‘F’ in the class).”

News@Northeastern: Can Listening To The Beatles Improve Your Memory? New Research Says Music Just Might Stir The Brain

News@Northeastern: Can Listening To The Beatles Improve Your Memory? New Research Says Music Just Might Stir The Brain. “Published in Nature’s Scientific Reports, Loui found that for older adults who listened to some of their favorite music, including The Beatles, connectivity in the brain increased. Specifically, [Psyche] Loui—and her multi-disciplinary team of music therapists, neurologists and geriatric psychiatrists—discovered that music bridged the gap between the brain’s auditory system and reward system, the area that governs motivation.”

Hackaday: A Home Made Sewing Machine May Be The Only One

Hackaday: A Home Made Sewing Machine May Be The Only One. “The sewing machine is a tool that many of us will have somewhere around our workshop. Concealed within it lies an intricate and fascinating mechanism. Some of us may have peered inside, but very few indeed of us will have gone to the effort of building our own. In case you had ever wondered whether it was possible, [Fraens] has done just that, with what he claims may be the only entirely homemade sewing machine on the Internet.”

Boing Boing: The Ai Promise Collection allows users to submit a personal promise in the form of a photographed note

Boing Boing: The Ai Promise Collection allows users to submit a personal promise in the form of a photographed note. “The Ai Promise Collection allows users to submit a personal promise in the form of a photographed note. There are currently 60 promises which you can click and view, such as #29, which states ‘I will never forget my dream.’” When you see Ai, you may think AI, but I believe “Ai” in Japanese means love/affection, which is the reference here.