Indiana Drones: Unmanned aerial vehicle gives archeologist a cool tool (RIT)

RIT: Indiana Drones: Unmanned aerial vehicle gives archeologist a cool tool. “An off-the-shelf drone customized for archeological surveys by Rochester Institute of Technology students will be on exhibit at the 10th annual Imagine RIT: Innovation and Creativity Festival on May 6….
[Leah] Bartnik designed the imaging system that clips on to the drone and measures chlorophyll, or the green pigment in vegetation. Her system combines a regular camera and near infrared sensors to measure the green pigment reflected in different wavelengths of light. Low levels of chlorophyll are a clue that an object of interest might be obstructing the roots. The thermal camera in the imaging system provides additional information to support or disprove the hunch.”

Gizmodo: This Machine Makes It Easy for Libraries to Clean Thousands of Books

Gizmodo: This Machine Makes It Easy for Libraries to Clean Thousands of Books. “How often have you pulled a rarely needed book off your shelf and needed to blow a layer of dust off of it? Now imagine what libraries have to deal with, given the tens of thousands of tomes in their collections. But it turns out someone’s already invented a machine that cleans books like a tiny waterless carwash.” This thing looks awesome!

Journal-Sentinel: Pfister artist Margaret Muza processes love of history through tintype photographs

This is marvelous! From the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel: Pfister artist Margaret Muza processes love of history through tintype photographs. “Muza, the artist in residence at Milwaukee’s Pfister Hotel, practices a style of photography popular during the American Civil War, capturing images onto sheets of metal. It’s called tintype photography, characterized by its use of metal to create a direct positive. The style — also known as melainotype or ferrotype — became popular in the mid-1850s. It was more durable and cheaper than daguerreotypes or ambrotype photographs at the time. The tintype method went out of common use at the beginning of the 20th century.”

Training a Neural Network to Tell Knock Knock Jokes

I saw some work of Janelle Shane’s on Tumblr and sent her a tweet expressing my appreciation. She jokingly replied, “Know anywhere I can find a huge database of knock-knock jokes?” and, well, you know how I am when someone asks about an online information collection. I gave her a collection of 200+ knock knock jokes and she used it to train a neural network. Thanks, Janelle. That was fun.

Mental Floss: This Museum Wants to Match You With Your Ancient Statue Doppelgänger

I missed this when it was launched in January but it looks like fun: This Museum Wants to Match You With Your Ancient Statue Doppelgänger. “In addition to supporting the arts and broadening your horizons, a trip to a museum is an opportunity to find your millennia-old look-alike hiding in an exhibit. If you haven’t been lucky enough to make such a discovery on your own, the Musée de la civilisation in Quebec City wants to help you find your match. The museum’s new project, ‘My 2000-Year-Old Double,’ pairs people’s faces with their ancient Greco-Roman or Egyptian sculpture counterparts.”

SiteProNews: New Start-Up Uses Augmented Reality to Create Immersive 3D Globe

Hey! From SiteProNews: New Start-Up Uses Augmented Reality to Create Immersive 3D Globe. “Play Shifu Technologies, a Wyoming-based startup, has created a Smart globe using augmented reality to teach children about different cultures, cuisines, monuments, inventions and animals from all over the world. To use Orboot, the child or parent simply scans the globe with an iOS or Android device to learn about countries worldwide.”