MakeUseOf: You Can Now Try the CERN Web Browser From 1990

MakeUseOf: You Can Now Try the CERN Web Browser From 1990. “CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) has rebuilt what was essentially the first web browser in the world. This means you can now see what surfing the World Wide Web was like back in 1990, using an application fittingly called WorldWideWeb.”

RIT News: Student MSD team recreates 16th century reading wheel

RIT News: Student MSD team recreates 16th century reading wheel . “Matt Nygren is a fifth-year mechanical engineering student who recently finished a unique multidisciplinary senior design project. Nygren worked with three other fifth-year mechanical engineering students, Ian Kurtz ’18, Reese Salen ’18 and Maher Abdelkawi, to recreate a piece of 16th century technology: Ramelli’s Rotating Reader.”

UCI News: UCI-led study finds Harry Potter fan fiction challenges cultural stereotypes of autism

Not quite in the wheelhouse, but I love it, I write fanfiction, and I have a close family member who’s an aspie. So, from UCI News: UCI-led study finds Harry Potter fan fiction challenges cultural stereotypes of autism. “Online publishing platforms and digital media can provide opportunities for nonmainstream groups to push back against and offer alternatives to the simplistic stereotypes presented in literature and popular culture. A study led by the University of California, Irvine focused on Harry Potter fan fiction and discovered that autistic people, family members, teachers and advocates cast autistic characters in their stories in diverse ways that challenge typical representations.”

TechCrunch: The Very Slow Movie Player shows a film over an entire year

Not at all relevant to this newsletter, but I think it’s nifty, and it’s New Year’s Eve, so… from TechCrunch: The Very Slow Movie Player shows a film over an entire year. “It seems someone took Every Frame a Painting literally: The Very Slow Movie Player is a device that turns cinema into wallpaper, advancing the image by a single second every hour. The result is an interesting household object that makes something new of even the most familiar film.”

Hackaday: Artificial Intelligence Composes New Christmas Songs

Hackaday: Artificial Intelligence Composes New Christmas Songs. “One of the most common uses of neural networks is the generation of new content, given certain constraints. A neural network is created, then trained on source content – ideally with as much reference material as possible. Then, the model is asked to generate original content in the same vein. This generally has mixed, but occasionally amusing, results. The team at [Made by AI] had a go at generating Christmas songs using this very technique.” These aren’t just cute song names. The AI made songs you can listen to on Soundcloud.

The Verge: Check out some of the best data visualizations from the Information is Beautiful awards

The Verge: Check out some of the best data visualizations from the Information is Beautiful awards. “For the past six years, Information is Beautiful has hosted awards for the best data visualizations and interactive stories. The organization recently announced the shortlist for the 2018 awards (winners will be announced on December 4th), which run the gamut from the psychological effects of movie genres to how spring is arriving earlier and earlier.”

Artnet: Satellites Are Taking Data-Based Images of the Earth and the Colors Are Spectacular—See Them Here

Artnet: Satellites Are Taking Data-Based Images of the Earth and the Colors Are Spectacular—See Them Here. “Experience Earth art as you’ve never seen it before in a stunning new set of satellite images that depicts the globe’s landscape in otherworldly hues. Last month, the United States Geological Survey released the fifth installment of the ‘Earth as Art’ series drawn from imagery taken by the Landsat satellite program.”