Gizmodo: 4000 Google Earth Photos Were Edited And Assembled Into This Dizzying Race Across The Earth

Gizmodo: 4000 Google Earth Photos Were Edited And Assembled Into This Dizzying Race Across The Earth. “You don’t always need a wealthy record label to create a memorable music video. As YouTube’s Adnaan demonstrates, all you need is access to the massive archive of satellite photos on Google Earth, and enough time to painstakingly assemble over 4000 of them into a frantic race across the Earth.” Caravan Palace as the soundtrack, so you know you can’t miss.

Digital Trends: Prototype Device Lets You Easily Switch Between Privacy Options Online

Digital Trends: Prototype Device Lets You Easily Switch Between Privacy Options Online. “Even people who consider themselves to be in the know about tech can get flummoxed when it comes to the subject of online privacy. Who is tracking you and how is something many users don’t follow, and there are few simple means of learning this information. That’s something a nifty piece of hardware created by Spanish designers Roman Torre and Angeles Angulo hopes to address. What they’ve developed is a 3D-printed prototype of a desktop device, called Thero, that allows users to switch between encrypted communication methods simply by turning a dial.” How cool is that?

TechCrunch: Samsung’s new app uses emojis to help people with language disorders communicate

TechCrunch: Samsung’s new app uses emojis to help people with language disorders communicate. “Created by Samsung Electronics Italia (the company’s Italian subsidiary) and speech therapist Francesca Polini, Wemogee replaces text phrases with emoji combinations and can be used as a messaging app or in face-to-face interactions. It supports English and Italian and will be available for Android on April 28, with an iOS version slated for future release.”

ResponseSource: Historian uses Google Streetview to find Britain’s “lost” 1930s-era cycleways (PRESS RELEASE)

This is a press release from ResponseSource but it’s not very “press-releasy” – Historian uses Google Streetview to find Britain’s “lost” 1930s-era cycleways. “These cycleways were installed beside British roads between 1934 and 1940, but were abandoned after the Second World War. Many were surfaced with red concrete, protected cyclists with kerbs and extended for many miles. They were commissioned by the Ministry of Transport and were built on both sides of the arterial roads constructed in the 1930s. Author and historian Carlton Reid used archive sources to identify the likely locations for the cycleways, and then confirmed their existence not with field walks or even bike rides, but with Google Streetview.”

Wisconsin State Journal: Artist documents roadside memorials though photographs

Wisconsin State Journal: Artist documents roadside memorials though photographs. “Memorials along a roadside aren’t always adorned with fresh-cut flowers or Mylar balloons that instantaneously catch the eye. Sometimes they are simply a petite wooden cross or a weathered stone tucked away in the grass. Regardless of their appearances, however, these spots are sacred to those who tend or create them.”

Hyperallergic: Watch the British Library Digitize One of the World’s Largest Books

Hyperallergic: Watch the British Library Digitize One of the World’s Largest Books. “The 1660 Klencke Atlas is among the world’s biggest books, measuring nearly six feet by seven and a half feet when open. So when the British Library digitized the towering tome, it required several people to maneuver it to a platform for its high-resolution photographs.”