Mental Floss: This Museum Wants to Match You With Your Ancient Statue Doppelgänger

I missed this when it was launched in January but it looks like fun: This Museum Wants to Match You With Your Ancient Statue Doppelgänger. “In addition to supporting the arts and broadening your horizons, a trip to a museum is an opportunity to find your millennia-old look-alike hiding in an exhibit. If you haven’t been lucky enough to make such a discovery on your own, the Musée de la civilisation in Quebec City wants to help you find your match. The museum’s new project, ‘My 2000-Year-Old Double,’ pairs people’s faces with their ancient Greco-Roman or Egyptian sculpture counterparts.”

SiteProNews: New Start-Up Uses Augmented Reality to Create Immersive 3D Globe

Hey! From SiteProNews: New Start-Up Uses Augmented Reality to Create Immersive 3D Globe. “Play Shifu Technologies, a Wyoming-based startup, has created a Smart globe using augmented reality to teach children about different cultures, cuisines, monuments, inventions and animals from all over the world. To use Orboot, the child or parent simply scans the globe with an iOS or Android device to learn about countries worldwide.”

NewAtlas: Posters and t-shirts turned into (very) local FM radio stations

From NewAtlas, wow! Posters and t-shirts turned into (very) local FM radio stations. “What if a band’s poster could actually transmit a sample of their music to your phone, or your t-shirt could monitor your vital signs while you exercise? Researchers at the University of Washington (UW) have pioneered a technique where everyday objects can be embedded with transmitters that piggyback ambient FM signals to send data to nearby smartphones and radios using almost no power.” Can you imagine using this technology in a museum exhibit?

Nieman Lab: The Atlantic brings readers into its archives with timelines based on their birthdays

Nieman Lab: The Atlantic brings readers into its archives with timelines based on their birthdays. “The Atlantic is 160 years old this year, which has gotten it thinking about ways it can tap its archives. On Monday it launched ‘The Atlantic Life Timeline,’ a feature that lets readers see their lives in the context of events the magazine has covered.” Looks cool both for history and genealogy.

The Drum: Oreo’s latest gimmick lets fans virtually launch cookies into space via Google Earth

Oh, why not. From The Drum: Oreo’s latest gimmick lets fans virtually launch cookies into space via Google Earth. “Mondelez’s Oreo has rolled out a mobile game that lets fans of the cookie brand launch Oreos into space and watch them fall into glasses of milk all over the world.”

Microorganisms in the Library: Bringing Centuries-Old Books to Life (Labiotech)

This showed up in my Google Alerts from Labiotech.eu,and I’m not sure if I’m impressed or squicked out: Microorganisms in the Library: Bringing Centuries-Old Books to Life . “Sarah Craske describes herself as a ‘British artist, without category.’ Her work, at the intersection of art and science, revolves around the development of her own discipline: Biological Hermeneutics. Hermeneutics refers to the interpretation of texts, a term commonly used regarding the bible or philosophy. Craske translates the concept to biology by exploring the role of books as ‘centers of microbial data and data transfer.'” I think I’m squicked first, then I get past that and am impressed.

Atlas Obscura: Library Hand, the Fastidiously Neat Penmanship Style Made for Card Catalogs

I love this article from Atlas Obscura: Library Hand, the Fastidiously Neat Penmanship Style Made for Card Catalogs. “In September 1885, a bunch of librarians spent four days holed up in scenic Lake George, just over 200 miles north of New York City. In the presence of such library-world luminaries as Melvil Dewey—the well-organized chap whose Dewey Decimal System keeps shelves orderly to this day—they discussed a range of issues, from the significance of the term ‘bookworm’ to the question of whether libraries ought to have a separate reference-room for ladies. They then turned their attention to another crucial issue: handwriting.”