Electronic Beats: This Fascinating Site Visualizes Random Techno Mixes In Real Time

Electronic Beats: This Fascinating Site Visualizes Random Techno Mixes In Real Time. “The internet is bursting with an overwhelming amount of amazing techno mixes, podcasts and radio channels. But for all their musical promise, online platforms are still lagging when it comes to visual accompaniment. A new website called ‘inward’ is hoping to change all that. It provides a non-stop psychedelic barrage of visuals synced in realtime to a curated selection of underground techno radio stations and Soundcloud mixes.” As you might expect, a lot of bright flashing/flickering lights on this site, so be warned.

Jsomers: DocWriter: the typewriter that sends its keystrokes in real time to a Google Doc

Jsomers: DocWriter: the typewriter that sends its keystrokes in real time to a Google Doc. “For years I’ve wanted a writing machine that would combine the best parts of a typewriter and a word processor. After months of tinkering, my friend Ben Gross and I just finished building one. We call it the DocWriter. It’s a typewriter that sends its keystrokes in real time to a Google Doc.” I think I’m in love.

Lifehacker: Add Your House to the “Teal Pumpkin Project” Map to Make Halloween Safer for Kids With Allergies

Lifehacker: Add Your House to the “Teal Pumpkin Project” Map to Make Halloween Safer for Kids With Allergies . “Started in 2014 by FARE, the Teal Pumpkin Project is a campaign that aims to make Halloween safer for everyone, including the one in 13 kids who has a food allergy ranging from mild to life-threatening. Common allergens in candies include nuts, milk, egg, soy or wheat. To participate in the project, you simply need to provide non-food treats for trick-or-treaters, and place a teal pumpkin—the color symbolizing food allergy awareness—in front of your home.”

Penn State Daily Collegian: Here’s how Penn State professor Mark Ballora transforms data sets to instrumental music

Penn State Daily Collegian: Here’s how Penn State professor Mark Ballora transforms data sets to instrumental music. “Many people use data sets to form a line on a graph. But Mark Ballora, a professor of music technology, maps data to auditory characteristics — such as pitches and loudness — and creates music in the process. This technique, which is called ‘sonification,’ is Ballora’s specialty. He’s used it on a variety of natural phenomena such as the aurora borealis and tropical storms.”

British Library: A rough guide to making a manuscript

British Library: A rough guide to making a manuscript. “Tonight, when you pick up your book, observe the legacy of sewn gatherings in the fixings of the pages. Discern, in your fountain pen, the memory of the hollow feather. What follows is a general, Wiki-How-style overview of how a medieval manuscript would have been fashioned. The craft flourished for over 1,000 years and dominates the material foundation of Western literary culture.” Reading this made me really appreciate the artists and crafters who made these books.

Washington Post: Now you can see what Donald Trump sees every time he opens Twitter

Washington Post: Now you can see what Donald Trump sees every time he opens Twitter. “Users of Twitter will understand…that it can be tricky to know what someone else sees when he or she fires up the application. Everyone follows a different group of people, and that colors the information they receive. To that end, we’ve created @trumps_feed, an account that checks whom Trump follows every five minutes and then retweets any new tweets from them over that period. The net result is a replication of what Trump would see on those occasions that he switches over from the Mentions tab.” I think this is fascinating because you can see what’s driving a person’s thinking and reactions (to a greater or lesser extent, of course). I would love to see a tool like this for all world leaders on Twitter.