Washington Post: Now you can see what Donald Trump sees every time he opens Twitter

Washington Post: Now you can see what Donald Trump sees every time he opens Twitter. “Users of Twitter will understand…that it can be tricky to know what someone else sees when he or she fires up the application. Everyone follows a different group of people, and that colors the information they receive. To that end, we’ve created @trumps_feed, an account that checks whom Trump follows every five minutes and then retweets any new tweets from them over that period. The net result is a replication of what Trump would see on those occasions that he switches over from the Mentions tab.” I think this is fascinating because you can see what’s driving a person’s thinking and reactions (to a greater or lesser extent, of course). I would love to see a tool like this for all world leaders on Twitter.

CNET: Beam a message into space for Voyager’s 40th anniversary

CNET: Beam a message into space for Voyager’s 40th anniversary. “To celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Golden Record being sent into space, NASA is inviting space fans to send a short, positive message that could end up in space. After input from the Voyager team and a public vote, one of the submitted messages will be selected by NASA to ‘beam into interstellar space’ on Sept. 5 — the 40th anniversary of Voyager 1’s launch.”

The Verge: Don’t blindly trust companies selling solar eclipse glasses on Amazon

A bit outside my remit, but eyesight, it’s important: Don’t blindly trust companies selling solar eclipse glasses on Amazon. “A quick search of solar filter glasses on Amazon will pull up hundreds of companies selling products for safely viewing the eclipse. Many of the glasses are sponsored or recommended by Amazon, and claim to have been certified for safely viewing the Sun. However, some of the vendors being featured on Amazon’s website are allegedly selling counterfeit products, and it’s hard to tell which ones are legitimate.”

Gamasutra: Dev builds a classic text adventure out of Wikipedia entries

Gamasutra: Dev builds a classic text adventure out of Wikipedia entries. “Freelance game designer Kevan Davis has published something interesting this month: Wikipedia: The Text Adventure, a browser-based game that pulls assets directly from Wikipedia and presents them to the player in the guise of a vintage text adventure.” If you ever played Zork the home page is gonna look really familiar…

New York Academy of Medicine: How to Pass Your O.W.L.s at Hogwarts: A Prep Course

A cute display from the New York Academy of Medicine:
How to Pass Your O.W.L.s at Hogwarts: A Prep Course
. “This collection celebrates the twentieth anniversary of the publication of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by showcasing rare books and objects dating back to the fifteenth century that reveal the history behind many of the creatures, plants and other magical elements that appear in the Harry Potter series—from mandrakes to basilisks to Nicholas Flamel and the philosopher’s stone itself. The collection is organized as a fictional study aid for Hogwarts students preparing for their important wizardry exams, the O.W.L.s., with content relating to seven Hogwarts courses.”

Gizmodo: 4000 Google Earth Photos Were Edited And Assembled Into This Dizzying Race Across The Earth

Gizmodo: 4000 Google Earth Photos Were Edited And Assembled Into This Dizzying Race Across The Earth. “You don’t always need a wealthy record label to create a memorable music video. As YouTube’s Adnaan demonstrates, all you need is access to the massive archive of satellite photos on Google Earth, and enough time to painstakingly assemble over 4000 of them into a frantic race across the Earth.” Caravan Palace as the soundtrack, so you know you can’t miss.

Digital Trends: Prototype Device Lets You Easily Switch Between Privacy Options Online

Digital Trends: Prototype Device Lets You Easily Switch Between Privacy Options Online. “Even people who consider themselves to be in the know about tech can get flummoxed when it comes to the subject of online privacy. Who is tracking you and how is something many users don’t follow, and there are few simple means of learning this information. That’s something a nifty piece of hardware created by Spanish designers Roman Torre and Angeles Angulo hopes to address. What they’ve developed is a 3D-printed prototype of a desktop device, called Thero, that allows users to switch between encrypted communication methods simply by turning a dial.” How cool is that?