University of East Anglia: Rare Volumes Provide Contemporary Design Inspiration

University of East Anglia: Rare Volumes Provide Contemporary Design Inspiration. “What kind of image do the words ‘rare books’ conjure up? Probably a man turning pages with white gloves in an atmosphere that’s reverent, hushed, and a bit stuffy. The Unlocking the Archive project, led by Dr Tom Roebuck and Dr Sophie Butler from UEA’s School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing, has been about challenging that perception.”

The Scotsman: Great Scottish books to get Scots translation

The Scotsman: Great Scottish books to get Scots translation. “Works such as Shuggie Bain by Douglas Stuart, Dracula by Bram Stoker, Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell, Outlander by Diana Gabaldon and Peter Pan are to get the Scots treatment in a new project designed to promote the language. Braw Beginnings is being run as part of Scotland’s Year of Stories, with Scots language ambassador Alistair Heather leading the work for VisitScotland.”

‘It takes a village to build a whale’: Dal’s Blue Whale Project set to soar this fall (Dalhousie University)

Dalhousie University: ‘It takes a village to build a whale’: Dal’s Blue Whale Project set to soar this fall. “Since 2017, Dalhousie’s Blue Whale Project has left a big impression on everyone who’s encountered it, from students and faculty to community members and volunteers. Now, just months away from the blue whale arriving at its final resting place in Dal’s Steele Ocean Sciences Building, there is a buzz of excitement around the university.”

Hackaday: Machine Learning Does Its Civic Duty By Spotting Roadside Litter

Hackaday: Machine Learning Does Its Civic Duty By Spotting Roadside Litter. “If there’s one thing that never seems to suffer from supply chain problems, it’s litter. It’s everywhere, easy to spot and — you’d think — pick up. Sadly, most of us seem to treat litter as somebody else’s problem, but with something like this machine vision litter mapper, you can at least be part of the solution.”

Ars Technica: Picasso‘s favorite pigment may one day recycle metals from your cell phone

Ars Technica: Picasso‘s favorite pigment may one day recycle metals from your cell phone. “Gold and certain other precious metals are key ingredients in computer chips, including those used in consumer electronics such as smart phones. But it can be difficult to recover and recycle those metals from electronic waste. Japanese researchers have found that a pigment widely used by artists called Prussian blue can extract gold and platinum-group metals from e-waste much more efficiently than conventional bio-based absorbents, according to a recent paper published in the journal Scientific Reports.”

NASA: New Images Using Data From Retired Telescopes Reveal Hidden Features

NASA: New Images Using Data From Retired Telescopes Reveal Hidden Features. “New images using data from ESA (European Space Agency) and NASA missions showcase the dust that fills the space between stars in four of the galaxies closest to our own Milky Way. More than striking, the snapshots are also a scientific trove, lending insight into how dramatically the density of dust clouds can vary within a galaxy.”

The Spaces: A London art installation is preserving Beirut’s at-risk buildings

The Spaces: A London art installation is preserving Beirut’s at-risk buildings. “Architect Annabel Karim Kassar has brought a life-size recreation of one of old Beirut’s Ottoman-Venetian homes to the V&A Museum in London. Part of an exhibition entitled The Lebanese House: saving a home, saving a city, the installation pays homage to the many historic homes destroyed or damaged in the 2020 explosion – caused by badly stored ammonium nitrate chemicals in the Lebanese capital’s port.”

Amateur Photographer: Brian May Reveals Plans For First International Stereoscopy Day

Amateur Photographer: Brian May Reveals Plans For First International Stereoscopy Day. “The event is planned to be a new international celebration of the birth of stereoscopic 3D. It will celebrate the inventor of stereoscopy, the British genius and polymath Sir Charles Wheatstone (who revealed his stereoscope in 1838), its early pioneers and their successors up to the present day.”

The Guardian: Future Library opens secret archive of unseen texts in Oslo

The Guardian: Future Library opens secret archive of unseen texts in Oslo. “On Sunday the Future Library, a project dreamed up by the Scottish artist Katie Paterson, was opened to the public in Oslo. After eight years, manuscripts penned by some of the world’s most famous living authors were delivered to ‘The silent room’ on the top floor of the Deichman library, where they will remain for the next 92 years.”

Fast Company: 3 years ago Notre-Dame caught on fire. This video game lets you fight to save it

Fast Company: 3 years ago Notre-Dame caught on fire. This video game lets you fight to save it. “A detailed architectural model of the building—originally made for another video game—has players working to save the burning cathedral.”

Core77: “Parallel Reality” Display Shows Different Info to Different People at Same Time

Core77: “Parallel Reality” Display Shows Different Info to Different People at Same Time. “Imagine if you, me and a dozen other people were standing in a room staring at the same screen—but the screen showed something different to each of us, simultaneously. A California-based tech company called Misapplied Sciences has made this possible.”

WIRED: How a Saxophonist Tricked the KGB by Encrypting Secrets in Music

WIRED: How a Saxophonist Tricked the KGB by Encrypting Secrets in Music. “IN 1985, SAXOPHONIST Merryl Goldberg found herself on a plane to Moscow with three fellow musicians from the Boston Klezmer Conservatory Band. She had carefully packed sheet music, reeds, and other woodwind supplies, along with a soprano saxophone, to bring into the USSR. But one of her spiral-bound notebooks, lined with staves for hand-notating music, contained hidden information.”

CFB Esquimalt Lookout Navy News: Electronics technician establishes digital library in the Congo

CFB Esquimalt Lookout Navy News: Electronics technician establishes digital library in the Congo. “The digital library employs [Nzolantima] Swasisa’s high-tech invention called Lokole – a tiny black box of computer components that harnesses free satellite internet signals available in Africa. It can provide web and email access within a 25-metre radius for 100 users. Swasisa notes only 18 per cent of Congo’s 90 million citizens have internet access.

Boing Boing: AI tries to generate chain restaurant signs with hilarious results

Boing Boing: AI tries to generate chain restaurant signs with hilarious results. “Janelle Shane is an AI researcher and the author of You Look Like a Thing and I Love You: How Artificial Intelligence Works and Why It’s Making the World a Weirder Place. In one of her more recent AI experiments, she tasked the Dall-e neural network with trying to generate corporate restaurant logos with some … interesting results.”

ScienceDaily: Just being exposed to new things makes people ‘ready to learn’

ScienceDaily: Just being exposed to new things makes people ‘ready to learn’. “A new study is one of the first to provide experimental evidence that people learn from incidental exposure to things that they know nothing about and aren’t even trying to understand.”