MIT Technology Review: Andrew Ng Has a Chatbot That Can Help with Depression

MIT Technology Review: Andrew Ng Has a Chatbot That Can Help with Depression. “I’m a little embarrassed to admit this, but I’ve been seeing a virtual therapist. It’s called Woebot, and it’s a Facebook chatbot developed by Stanford University researchers that offers interactive cognitive behavioral therapy. And Andrew Ng, a prominent figure who previously led efforts to develop and apply the latest AI technologies at Google and Baidu, is now lending his backing to the project by joining the board of directors of the company offering its services.”

The Century Foundation: Preserving the Right to Obscurity in the Age of Facial Recognition

The Century Foundation: Preserving the Right to Obscurity in the Age of Facial Recognition. “Facial recognition could also become a dangerous tool for cataloging participation in First Amendment activities. Religious and political associations could become known to the government on an enormous scale, with little effort or cost, enabling disruption, persecution, and abuse. American history throughout the twentieth century and recent government activities in the past two decades both demonstrate that fear of such abuse is quite warranted.”

Cornell Chronicle: Exhibition, research project highlight learning from Rembrandt’s art

Cornell Chronicle: Exhibition, research project highlight learning from Rembrandt’s art. “Watermarks are unique to each batch of paper the artist used, and can often confirm the date or edition of specific impressions. As part of the WIRE (Watermark Identification in Rembrandt’s Etchings) project at Cornell, students have been tasked with creating an online decision tree as a computational tool, which, when completed, will allow users to quickly and confidently identify watermarks from among the 54 main types and more than 500 known subvariants that appear in Rembrandt’s oeuvre, printed from some 300 plates in all.”

South Arabia Tweets: who is behind twitter bots in South Yemen? (Temple University)

Temple University: South Arabia Tweets: who is behind twitter bots in South Yemen?. “The idea on uncovering Twitter bots came from Marc Owen Jones’s work on the Bahraini monarchy’s use of bots to spread anti-Shi’a sectarianism as a counter-revolutionary tactic against pro-democracy movements. Upon discovering Twitter Archiver, a Google Drive add-on that employs the Twitter Advanced Search feature to allow one to search for different words, phrases, and hashtags, I began with several searches including ‘Houthi’ in search of Saudi state propaganda and potential bots to spread sectarian and anti-Iranian rhetoric in support of the Saudi war effort. Twitter Archiver collects all tweets that include the hashtag/phrase of interest that have been tweeted in the past 7 days, and saves these into an Excel spreadsheet in your Google Docs.”

Science Blog: Digital Map Helps Historians Get Granular With Holocaust Research

Science Blog: Digital Map Helps Historians Get Granular With Holocaust Research. “Looking at the list of names on Waitman Beorn’s computer screen is staggering. The eye blurs almost automatically as it searches through the 18,000 people – recorded by name, approximate birthdate and address – on the list compiled by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yet, these 18,000 are only a small fraction of the nearly 160,000 Jews who were placed into forced labor or systematically murdered under the brutal Nazi rule in Lviv, Ukraine.”

TechCrunch: 18 pessimistic opinions on the next 10 years of fake news (and 5 optimistic ones)

TechCrunch: 18 pessimistic opinions on the next 10 years of fake news (and 5 optimistic ones). “A topic like fake news, or more broadly the question of trust and verification on the internet, is a complex one — a land of contrasts. Sometimes you just have to poll the room and get a feel for what people are thinking before drawing any conclusions. That’s what Pew Internet did, contacting thousands of experts in tech, internet and social policy and asking how they thought things would go over the next decade. They were not optimistic!”

Texas Advanced Computing Center: Preservation For The (Digital) Ages

Texas Advanced Computing center: Preservation For The (Digital) Ages. “When Deborah Beck was preparing her book, Speech Presentation in Homeric Epic, her publisher suggested she make the database she had started in 2008 — a searchable catalogue of features from every speech in the Homeric poems — available to the public as a web application and companion resource. Since the application went live in 2013, more than 5,000 researchers have used it to parse the thousands of speeches found in the Iliad and the Odyssey and to explore different connections from those Beck investigated in her book…. However, as new web and database capabilities became available, Beck was finding it challenging to update the application, which was developed using the technologies from the 2000s.”