Phys .org: Scientists provide more than 57,000 camera trap images for massive study on Amazon wildlife

Phys .org: Scientists provide more than 57,000 camera trap images for massive study on Amazon wildlife. “Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) scientists working in the vast Amazon Basin have contributed more than 57,000 camera trap images for a new study published in the journal Ecology by an international team of 120 research institutions.”

EurekAlert: Arcadia Fund supports Plazi in its endeavor to rediscover known biodiversity

EurekAlert: Arcadia Fund supports Plazi in its endeavor to rediscover known biodiversity. “The Swiss-based Plazi NGO has received a grant of EUR 1.5 million from Arcadia Fund – a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin – to further develop its Biodiversity Literature Repository (BLR) established in collaboration with Zenodo, the open science repository hosted and managed by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), and the open-access scholarly publisher and technology provider Pensoft.”

Silence Of The iPods: Reflecting On The Ever-shifting Landscape Of Personal Media Consumption (Hack A Day)

Hack A Day: Silence Of The iPods: Reflecting On The Ever-shifting Landscape Of Personal Media Consumption . “On October 23rd of 2001, the first Apple iPod was launched. It wasn’t the first Personal Media Player (PMP), but as with many things Apple the iPod would go on to provide the benchmark for what a PMP should do, as well as what they should look like. While few today remember the PMP trailblazers like Diamond’s Rio devices, it’s hard to find anyone who doesn’t know what an ‘iPod’ is.” Not the kind of content I normally associate with Hack A Day, but very good.

News@Northeastern: In Light Of The Mass Shooting In Buffalo, Is It Time To Impose New Rules On Livestreaming?

News@Northeastern: In Light Of The Mass Shooting In Buffalo, Is It Time To Impose New Rules On Livestreaming?. “As it stands, social media and livestream platforms operate under a shared content moderation framework—namely that they are not responsible for user content or behavior, says John Wihbey, associate professor of media innovation and technology at Northeastern. But, as more perpetrators are inspired to commit acts of violence by being able to publicize them in real-time, it might be time to impose a new set of rules on the online platforms, Wihbey says.”

GIM International: Creating a 3D Model of the Famous Budapest Chain Bridge

GIM International: Creating a 3D Model of the Famous Budapest Chain Bridge. “Two Hungarian companies designed a three-step data collection workflow to overcome the challenges in this urban surveying project, which included the use of UAVs and remote-controlled boats for Lidar and photogrammetry data. The result: a digital 3D BIM-compatible model of Budapest’s iconic bridge over the River Danube to assist in preparations for restoration and renovation work.”

City Journal: Big Data Can Save Kids

City Journal: Big Data Can Save Kids. “The Carnegie Mellon researchers’ work raises an interesting question about algorithms: Why would we want to judge their success on any metric besides accuracy? Isn’t it the goal of predictive analytics to give us a better sense, in this case, of which kids are most at risk, rather than which decisions will make people feel better about racial outcomes? This isn’t to argue that we should make decisions based on algorithms alone.”

The Conversation: Language matters when Googling controversial people

The Conversation: Language matters when Googling controversial people. “Our recent research showed how Google’s search engine normalizes conspiracy theorists, hate figures and other controversial people by offering neutral and even sometimes positive subtitles. We used virtual private networks (VPNs) to conceal our locations and hide our browsing histories to ensure that search results were not based on our geographical location or search histories. We found, for example, that Alex Jones, ‘the most prolific conspiracy theorist in contemporary America,’ is defined as an ‘American radio host,’ while David Icke, who is also known for spreading conspiracies, is described as a ‘former footballer.'”

Engadget: Fewer Americans want the government to regulate Big Tech, Pew study says

Engadget: Fewer Americans want the government to regulate Big Tech, Pew study says. “Last year, more than half (56 percent) of Americans wanted more regulation of Big Tech. Now, only 44 percent of Americans want to see more government enforcement of tech companies. And the number of respondents who want less government regulation of the tech industry has doubled this year, from nine percent to 20 percent. But those results shouldn’t suggest that the public has a rosier view of Big Tech or trusts that tech companies are getting it right.”

The Next Web: DeepMind’s astounding new ‘Gato’ AI makes me fear humans will never achieve AGI

The Next Web: DeepMind’s astounding new ‘Gato’ AI makes me fear humans will never achieve AGI. “DeepMind today unveiled a new multi-modal AI system capable of performing more than 600 different tasks. Dubbed Gato, it’s arguably the most impressive all-in-one machine learning kit the world’s seen yet.”

MIT News: Technique protects privacy when making online recommendations

MIT News: Technique protects privacy when making online recommendations. “Algorithms recommend products while we shop online or suggest songs we might like as we listen to music on streaming apps. These algorithms work by using personal information like our past purchases and browsing history to generate tailored recommendations. The sensitive nature of such data makes preserving privacy extremely important, but existing methods for solving this problem rely on heavy cryptographic tools requiring enormous amounts of computation and bandwidth. MIT researchers may have a better solution.”

The Ohio State University: The deadly impact of urban streets that look like highways

The Ohio State University: The deadly impact of urban streets that look like highways. “Serious auto crashes in urban areas are more likely on city streets that look to drivers like highways, new research suggests. The study used a novel approach: Ohio State University researchers applied machine learning techniques to analyze more than 240,000 images of road segments in Columbus, Ohio, taken from Google Street View. The goal was to see what the roads looked like to drivers and whether that was linked to serious and deadly crashes.”

University of Melbourne: The Hidden Stories In Australia’s Cultural Data

University of Melbourne: The Hidden Stories In Australia’s Cultural Data. “The widespread digitisation of art and culture means data science is now being used to reveal fresh cultural stories and connections that would otherwise have been impossible to uncover. Researchers are detecting surprising trends, telling the micro-biographical histories of artists and asking new questions about the connection between the environment, the economy, and Australia’s arts and cultural life.”

Reuters: China launches antitrust probe into academic database CNKI

Reuters: China launches antitrust probe into academic database CNKI. “China’s market regulator said on Friday it had launched an antitrust investigation into the country’s largest online academic database, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI).”

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: A public database significantly undercounts former drug labs in Pa. Here’s why homebuyers and renters should care.

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: A public database significantly undercounts former drug labs in Pa. Here’s why homebuyers and renters should care.. “The only online federal database that allows people to see whether their home or property was contaminated with toxic chemicals used to make drugs like methamphetamine significantly undercounts the number of sites in Pennsylvania, according to data obtained by Spotlight PA. Similar reporting discrepancies exist in neighboring states, but Pennsylvania is one of several nationwide that do not have laws or guidelines outlining how contaminated properties should be cleaned or when they are safe to live in, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.”

Alabama shipwreck holds key to the past for descendants of enslaved Africans: “Be sure that that legacy lives on” (CBS News)

CBS News: Alabama shipwreck holds key to the past for descendants of enslaved Africans: “Be sure that that legacy lives on”. “Work performed this month will help answer a question residents of the area called Africatown USA are anxious to resolve: Can remnants of the slave ship Clotilda be retrieved from the water to both fill out details about their heritage and to serve as an attraction that might revitalize the place their ancestors built after emancipation?”