Analysis: 2,000 digital-only games will disappear when PlayStation closes its stores (Video Games Chronicle)

Video Games Chronicle: Analysis: 2,000 digital-only games will disappear when PlayStation closes its stores. “Although users will still be able to redownload their previous purchases for the foreseeable future, from July 2 it will no longer be possible to buy games on the PS3 or PSP online marketplaces, and come August 27 the same will apply to the Vita too. Of the games set to disappear from the formats, the vast majority are available on other platforms such as older PlayStation consoles or PC. However, around 138 games will essentially become lost forever once the stores close, our analysis suggests.”

EurekAlert: Exploring how storytelling tropes cluster in popular films

EurekAlert: Exploring how storytelling tropes cluster in popular films. “An analysis of film tropes–common storytelling elements seen in different movies–explores combinations of tropes that tend to co-occur in films, identifying patterns that could help inform development of new movies. Pablo García-Sánchez and Juan Merelo of the University of Granada, and Antonio Velez-Estevez and Manuel Cobo from the University of Cádiz, Spain present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on March 31, 2021.”

ScienceDaily: New statistical method eases data reproducibility crisis

ScienceDaily: New statistical method eases data reproducibility crisis. “A reproducibility crisis is ongoing in scientific research, where many studies may be difficult or impossible to replicate and thereby validate, especially when the study involves a very large sample size. Now researchers have developed a statistical tool that can accurately estimate the replicability of a study, thus eliminating the need to duplicate the work and effectively mitigating the reproducibility crisis.”

Berkman Klein Center: A meta-proposal for Twitter’s bluesky project

Berkman Klein Center: A meta-proposal for Twitter’s bluesky project. “Members of the Berkman Klein community, representing academics, activists, lawyers and technologists, came together to discuss the bluesky project, Twitter’s proposed protocol for public conversation. The discussions culminated in a ‘meta-proposal’ for the bluesky team and community, which presents suggestions on how to go about considering proposals and building out bluesky.” You can read more about Twitter’s proposed bluesky project here.

CNN: Microsoft earns contract worth up to $21.9 billion to make AR devices for the US Army

CNN: Microsoft earns contract worth up to $21.9 billion to make AR devices for the US Army. “The Army announced Wednesday that it had awarded Microsoft (MSFT) a contract to produce augmented reality systems based on its HoloLens 2 device called Integrated Visual Augmented Systems (IVAS). The devices are designed to help soldiers, ‘fight, rehearse and train using a single platform,’ the Army said. The deal has a five-year base and a five-year option to extend, and could be worth up to almost $21.9 billion over the full 10 years.”

Study: AI tool can help spot Type 2 diabetes trends in the U.S. (University at Buffalo)

University at Buffalo: Study: AI tool can help spot Type 2 diabetes trends in the U.S.. “A new University at Buffalo study reports on the advantages of using artificial intelligence to better understand Type 2 diabetes across the United States. The study describes how machine learning — a subset of AI that involves computers acting intelligently without being explicitly programmed — can help explore the prevalence of the disease, which effects more than 34 million Americans, as well as spot future trends.”

Angry Residents, Abrupt Stops: Waymo Vehicles Are Still Causing Problems in Arizona (Phoenix New Times)

Phoenix New Times: Angry Residents, Abrupt Stops: Waymo Vehicles Are Still Causing Problems in Arizona. “A driverless Waymo vehicle caused a crash in October by stopping unexpectedly in the middle of the road, displaying a technical malfunction the Google-related company claims is rare. In another 2020 incident, a police officer claimed a sudden stop by a Waymo vehicle caused a rear-end collision, but the officer was cited. The incidents are detailed in newly released police reports obtained by Phoenix New Times that shed fresh light on the function and operations of the driverless vehicles, which are often cloaked in secrecy.”

The Electrochemical Society: Free the Science Week Takes Down ECS Research Paywall

The Electrochemical Society: Free the Science Week Takes Down ECS Research Paywall. “The Electrochemical Society (ECS) celebrates its fifth annual Free the Science Week from April 5-11, 2021, by taking down the paywall to the ECS Digital Library. Throughout the week, the Society’s online collection of published research is freely accessible to everyone. The ECS Digital Library is hosted on IOPscience and includes over 160,000 scientific journal and magazine articles and meeting abstracts, and the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, the oldest peer-reviewed journal in its field.”

The Engineer: AI tool locates and classifies defects in wind turbine blades

The Engineer: AI tool locates and classifies defects in wind turbine blades. “Computer scientists at Loughborough University have developed a new tool that uses AI to analyse images of wind turbine blades to locate and highlight defects. The system has been ‘trained’ to classify defects by type – such as crack, erosion, void, and ‘other’ – which could lead to faster and more targeted responses.”

IEEE Spectrum: New Tool Strips Manipulative “Dark Patterns” From Mobile Apps

IEEE Spectrum: New Tool Strips Manipulative “Dark Patterns” From Mobile Apps. “The mobile apps we use every day are surprisingly manipulative. Subtle design tricks known as ‘dark patterns’ nudge us into doing what the app maker wants—be that buying products or continuing to scroll. But now, researchers are fighting back with a new tool that strips these unwanted features out of Android apps.”

Arizona State University: Center on Narrative, Disinformation, and Strategic Influence to use interdisciplinary approach

Arizona State University: Center on Narrative, Disinformation, and Strategic Influence to use interdisciplinary approach . “The Global Security Initiative at Arizona State University has always focused on how disinformation influences people, and it has now dedicated a new unit to that research — the Center on Narrative, Disinformation, and Strategic Influence. The center will use an interdisciplinary method of researching disinformation campaigns and developing tools to combat them, according to Scott Ruston, a research professor who will lead the new center, housed within the Global Security Initiative.”

CTV News: Turning to ‘Dr. Google’ may not be as anxiety-inducing or misleading as believed, study finds

CTV News: Turning to ‘Dr. Google’ may not be as anxiety-inducing or misleading as believed, study finds. “Have you found yourself Googling your symptoms in an attempt to soothe health-related anxieties, and then worried that you were going to accidentally misdiagnose yourself and make those anxieties worse? Well, according to a new study from the U.S., turning to ‘Dr. Google’ does not make a person’s assessment of their symptoms less accurate, or worsen their anxiety regarding their health.”

Engadget: Google AI is battling a ‘Great British Bake Off’ winner in a dessert face-off

Engadget: Google AI is battling a ‘Great British Bake Off’ winner in a dessert face-off. “Baking is as much science as it is art. Perhaps to find out whether the former’s more important, Google Cloud AI is taking on a Great British Bake Off winner in a dessert face-off. Sara Robinson, an amateur baker and Google Cloud developer advocate, built a machine learning model that examined hundreds of baking recipes (including ones for traybakes, cookies and scones) to help her come up with a new one.”