Column: Shame, suicide attempts, ‘financial death’ — the devastating toll of a crypto firm’s failure (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: Column: Shame, suicide attempts, ‘financial death’ — the devastating toll of a crypto firm’s failure. “To hundreds of Celsius’ 1.7 million customers, the value of the $11.7 billion in assets they deposited with the firm might as well be zero. ‘[Alex] Mashinsky always talked very confidently about how strong Celsius was and how much better than banks,’ recalls Harold M. Lott, 35, a Nashville-area nurse who had as much as $14,000 in cryptocurrency assets deposited at Celsius at the peak of the crypto market. ‘He never gave any indication that there was a problem,’ Lott says. ‘But suddenly, out of the blue, they just stopped all transfers.’”

Bleeping Computer: Hackers attack UK water supplier with 1.6 million customers

Bleeping Computer: Hackers attack UK water supplier with 1.6 million customers. “South Staffordshire Water, a company supplying 330 million liters of drinking water to 1.6 consumers daily, has issued a statement confirming IT disruption from a cyberattack. As the announcement explains, the safety and water distribution systems are still operational, so the disruption of the IT systems doesn’t impact the supply of safe water to its customers or those of its subsidiaries, Cambridge Water and South Staffs Water.”

AFP: China’s Taiwan drills accompanied by wave of misinformation

AFP: China’s Taiwan drills accompanied by wave of misinformation. “China raged against a visit to Taipei by United States House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, sending warships, missiles and jets into the waters and skies around its self-ruled neighbour. At the same time pro-China posts flooded social media with false and misleading claims about Pelosi and her Taiwanese hosts. Many were posts sharing old military footage alongside claims they showed real military drills, mainly by China.”

“It’s Potentially Illegal”: As Crypto Crashed, Coinbase Stopped Some Notifications (Mother Jones)

Mother Jones: “It’s Potentially Illegal”: As Crypto Crashed, Coinbase Stopped Some Notifications. “Coinbase’s decision to stop email notifications in the middle of a dramatic cryptocurrency crash has not been previously reported. But academics who spoke to Mother Jones note that Coinbase’s decision likely contributed to losses for retail crypto investors who may otherwise have sold their holdings ahead of further devaluation. The change to price updates could run afoul of federal or state consumer protection laws, they said, particularly if it hurt the wallets of any of the relatively inexperienced traders who flocked to crypto in droves during the pandemic.”

Government Technology: Higher Ed’s Growing Consortium of Cybersecurity Clinics

Government Technology: Higher Ed’s Growing Consortium of Cybersecurity Clinics. “As public- and private-sector industries grapple with an increase in cyber attacks and a shortage of IT talent, higher education institutions have increased their focus on cybersecurity training, as well as securing their own growing networks for remote learning. With these trends in mind, several universities are now partnering with one another through the newly formed Consortium of Cybersecurity Clinics to share best practices across these fronts and to help others secure their networks.”

CNN: Account bearing Ohio FBI standoff suspect’s name encouraged violence against the agency in posts on Trump social media platform

CNN: Account bearing Ohio FBI standoff suspect’s name encouraged violence against the agency in posts on Trump social media platform. “An account bearing the name of Ricky Shiffer, the man authorities say they killed after he tried Thursday to breach an FBI field office in Cincinnati, made posts on the social media platform founded by Donald Trump referencing the attempt to storm the office and encouraging others online to prepare for a revolutionary-type war.”

Krebs on Security: It Might Be Our Data, But It’s Not Our Breach

Krebs on Security: It Might Be Our Data, But It’s Not Our Breach. “A cybersecurity firm says it has intercepted a large, unique stolen data set containing the names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, Social Security Numbers and dates of birth on nearly 23 million Americans. The firm’s analysis of the data suggests it corresponds to current and former customers of AT&T. The telecommunications giant stopped short of saying the data wasn’t theirs, but it maintains the records do not appear to have come from its systems and may be tied to a previous data incident at another company.”

Android Police: Google wants to remind you that using 2FA doesn’t have to be a… drag

Android Police: Google wants to remind you that using 2FA doesn’t have to be a… drag . “Google has enlisted the help of drag personality Trixie Mattel to promote the use of two-factor authentication through the company’s Safer with Google initiative. The spot highlights one of the most straightforward 2FA methods — sending a notification to your phone to approve or reject a login request — to show that it doesn’t need to be an overly complicated ordeal.” I’m a Trixie fan but I think I’ll stick with my YubiKey.

Reuters: Scam loan apps extorting Mexicans thrive in Google Play Store

Reuters: Scam loan apps extorting Mexicans thrive in Google Play Store. “[Pedro] Figueroa is one of more than 2,230 people who fell prey to fraudulent loan apps in Mexico between June 2021 and January 2022, according to data compiled by the Citizen Council for Justice and Security, an advocacy group based in Mexico City. The Thomson Reuters Foundation found 29 loan apps with millions of downloads in the Google Play Store that have been reported to the authorities for extortion, fraud, violation of Mexican privacy law, and abusive financial practices.”