Chicago Booth Review: Law and order and data

Chicago Booth Review: Law and order and data. “Algorithms are already being used in criminal-justice applications in many places, helping decide where police departments should send officers for patrol, as well as which defendants should be released on bail and how judges should hand out sentences. Research is exploring the potential benefits and dangers of these tools, highlighting where they can go wrong and how they can be prevented from becoming a new source of inequality. The findings of these studies prompt some important questions such as: Should artificial intelligence play some role in policing and the courts? If so, what role should it play? The answers, it appears, depend in large part on small details.”

Emerging Europe: Poland and Hungary are gunning for the social media giants

Emerging Europe: Poland and Hungary are gunning for the social media giants. “At a time when major social networks, primarily Facebook and Twitter, are facing increased scrutiny over issues such as the spreading of misinformation and the promotion of extremist ideologies that could undermine democracy, Poland is debating a new law that will stop social media platforms from deleting content or banning users who do not break Polish laws.”

StateTech Magazine: New Forms of Ransomware and 5G Smart City Attacks Could Cause Real Harm, Expert Warns

StateTech Magazine: New Forms of Ransomware and 5G Smart City Attacks Could Cause Real Harm, Expert Warns. “The threat of ransomware attacks for state and local governments has been an ever-present peril over the past several years, one that has gotten worse, experts say. What’s more, the threat is likely going to evolve to attack cloud service providers that host government services. That’s according to cybersecurity expert Theresa Payton, who detailed her IT security predictions for 2021 and 2022 during a recent webinar sponsored by CDW and Intel.”

AFP: Google flags higher ad rates in France, Spain after digital tax

AFP: Google flags higher ad rates in France, Spain after digital tax. “Google has told customers that it will raise the rates for advertisements on its French and Spanish platforms by two percent from May to help offset the impact of a digital tax on profits. France has collected the levy since 2019, and Spain since this year, under pressure from voters to make US tech giants pay a greater share of taxes in countries where they operate.”

MIT Technology Review: Hackers are finding ways to hide inside Apple’s walled garden

MIT Technology Review: Hackers are finding ways to hide inside Apple’s walled garden. “You’ve heard of Apple’s famous walled garden, the tightly controlled tech ecosystem that gives the company unique control of features and security. All apps go through a strict Apple approval process, they are confined so sensitive information isn’t gathered on the phone, and developers are locked out of places they’d be able to get into in other systems. The barriers are so high now that it’s probably more accurate to think of it as a castle wall.”

Ars Technica: Clubhouse’s security and privacy lag behind its explosive growth

Ars Technica: Clubhouse’s security and privacy lag behind its explosive growth. “In recent months, the audio-based social media app Clubhouse has emerged as Silicon Valley’s latest disruptive darling. The format feels familiar: part Twitter, part Facebook Live, part talking on the phone. But as Clubhouse continues to expand, its security and privacy failings have come under increased scrutiny—and left the company scrambling to correct problems and manage expectations.”

SecurityWeek: Thousands of Mobile Apps Expose Data via Misconfigured Cloud Containers

SecurityWeek: Thousands of Mobile Apps Expose Data via Misconfigured Cloud Containers. “Thousands of mobile applications expose user data through insecurely implemented cloud containers, according to a new report from security vendor Zimperium. The issue, the company notes, is rooted in the fact that many developers tend to overlook the security of cloud containers during the development process.”

The Connexion: French tax office trials social media checks to detect fraud

The Connexion: French tax office trials social media checks to detect fraud. “French tax authorities will now be able to use data published online to cross-check tax declarations. This includes text, images, videos and photos published on social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, as well as online sales platforms including Leboncoin, Vinted and Ebay. The new measure is being introduced on a trial basis, for three years.” French authorities have already used Google Maps to find evaders of swimming pool taxes.

Military .com: Pentagon Eyes Plan to Intensify Social Media Screening in Military Background Investigations

Military .com: Pentagon Eyes Plan to Intensify Social Media Screening in Military Background Investigations. “The Defense Department ‘is examining a scalable means of implementing social media screening in conjunction with background investigations,’ Pentagon officials said in suggested training materials distributed for a stand-down to discuss extremism. The military-wide pause in operations was ordered by Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin.”

Post & Courier: SC could punish social media sites for suspending accounts under new proposal

Post & Courier: SC could punish social media sites for suspending accounts under new proposal. “In the two months since Twitter banned President Donald Trump from its platform, leading Republican voices have lambasted the company for what they called acts of censorship — including U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina. Now, a freshman Upstate state lawmaker wants to go even further, requiring social media companies to inform holders of suspended Palmetto State-based accounts why they’ve been booted within 10 days or face punishment under the state’s Unfair Trade Practices Act.”