TechCrunch: Facebook expands fact-checking program, adopts new technology for fighting fake news

TechCrunch: Facebook expands fact-checking program, adopts new technology for fighting fake news. “Facebook this morning announced an expansion of its fact-checking program and other actions it’s taking to combat the scourge of fake news on its social network. The company, which was found to be compromised by Russian trolls whose disinformation campaigns around the November 2016 presidential election reached 150 million Americans, has been increasing its efforts at fact-checking news through a combination of technology and human review in the months since.”

Neowin: Facebook is also working on a time management feature

Neowin: Facebook is also working on a time management feature. “This year’s trend in mobile software features seems to be focusing on helping users manage how much time they spend on their devices. After Google first talked about ‘digital wellbeing’ at its I/O conference back in May, Apple was quick to follow suit with the announcement of iOS 12 earlier this month. But, while those two companies are building the feature directly into their respective operating systems, Facebook seems to believe it can do a better job. It had already started working on a similar feature for the Instagram app shortly after Google I/O, and now it’s time for Facebook itself to receive a similar treatment.”

TechCrunch: Google Assistant’s ‘Continued Conversation’ feature is now live

TechCrunch: Google Assistant’s ‘Continued Conversation’ feature is now live. “Google I/O was awash with Assistant news, but Duplex mystery aside, Continued Conversation was easily one of the most compelling announcements of the bunch. The feature is an attempt to bring more naturalized conversation to the AI — a kind of holy grail with these sorts of smart assistants. Continued Conversation is rolling out to Assistant today for users in the U.S. with a Home, Home Mini and Home Max.”

Google Blog: Save dinosaurs from extinction in a game world built with Google Maps

Google Blog: Save dinosaurs from extinction in a game world built with Google Maps. “Just in time for summer and the release of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom™, you can explore a virtual world built with Google Maps while saving dinosaurs from extinction. Ludia and Universal’s Jurassic World™ Alive is available for free on Google Play and the App Store now.”

Engadget: Pocket Casts opens up Android beta to the public

Engadget: Pocket Casts opens up Android beta to the public. “Pocket Casts, the incredibly popular podcast application, announced today that it is opening up a public beta program for Android users. This will allow any interested user access to the app’s newest features, with the caveat that builds might be broken or unstable. If you’d like to sign up for the public beta on Android, you can do so at this Google Play link.” I’ve used Pocket Casts on iOS for ages and I love it. If you’re looking for a podcast client, I encourage you to give it a try.

Offsetting as a path to full Open Access: MIT and the Royal Society of Chemistry sign first North American ‘read and publish’ agreement (In the Open)

In the Open: Offsetting as a path to full Open Access: MIT and the Royal Society of Chemistry sign first North American ‘read and publish’ agreement. “Over the past few years the MIT Libraries – like many US research libraries– have been watching with interest the development of ‘offsetting’ agreements in Europe and the UK. In offsetting agreements, a single license incorporates costs associated with access to paywalled articles and costs associated with open access publication. This type of agreement has emerged in Europe and the UK and been the source of both new deals and broken deals.”

CNET: Google Chrome will automatically download articles you haven’t asked for yet

CNET: Google Chrome will automatically download articles you haven’t asked for yet. “Want to browse the news but don’t have connection to the internet? Google Chrome is getting a new feature for Android that automatically downloads articles when you’re connected to Wi-Fi for you to read offline — even if you haven’t asked for them.”