Techdirt: More Than Half Of U.S. States Now Pushing Their Own Net Neutrality Rules

Techdirt: More Than Half Of U.S. States Now Pushing Their Own Net Neutrality Rules. “Large ISP lobbyists, the FCC and agency head Ajit Pai are going to be rather busy for the foreseeable future. In the wake of the agency’s extremely unpopular net neutrality repeal, consumer groups note that 26 states (27 including a new effort in Kansas) have now taken action to protect net neutrality themselves — with more efforts on the way. The efforts range from attempts to pass state-level net neutrality rules banning anti-competitive behavior, to executive orders modifying state procurement rules to prohibit ISPs that violate net neutrality from getting state money or securing state contracts.”

Open Preservation: The National Archives joins the Open Preservation Foundation

Open Preservation: The National Archives joins the Open Preservation Foundation. “The Open Preservation Foundation (OPF) is pleased to welcome The National Archives of the UK as our newest charter member. The National Archives is the official archive and publisher for the UK Government. They are the guardians of more than 1,000 years of iconic national and international documents, including the Domesday Book, Shakespeare’s will, and the Windrush passenger lists.”

The Verge: Chrome 64 now trims messy links when you share them

The Verge: Chrome 64 now trims messy links when you share them. “Google’s latest consumer version of Chrome, version number 64, just started cleaning up messy referral links for you. Now, when you go to share an item, you’ll no longer see a long tracking string after a link, just the primary link itself, as spotted by Android Police.”

USA Today: Facebook says Kremlin-linked ads ready for public view, but House hasn’t released them

USA Today: Facebook says Kremlin-linked ads ready for public view, but House hasn’t released them. “A Facebook official said Tuesday that the social network had finished ‘scrubbing’ personal information from Kremlin-linked ads placed on their platform to influence the 2016 election, clearing the way for Congress to release them to the public. However, the House Intelligence Committee has still not released the ads, which Facebook said it provided to lawmakers last week after removing any personally identifiable information that could violate people’s privacy.”