NiemanLab: Who shares the news that people see on Facebook — friends or publishers?

NiemanLab: Who shares the news that people see on Facebook — friends or publishers?. “The majority of people in our survey (54%) saw no news within the first 10 posts in their feeds at all. The most common type of news in the sample was hard news from mainstream publishers. I got a good question from Nieman Lab reader and contributor Dan Kennedy: ‘Were you looking only at stories from news organizations popping up in someone’s news feed? Or were you also counting friends who share news stories?'”

Ubergizmo: YouTube Testing A Timestamp Button For Commenting

Ubergizmo: YouTube Testing A Timestamp Button For Commenting. “While YouTube does allow users to leave comments that include the timestamp, sometimes you have to go hunting for it, and not all users bother either, but that could change in the future. It would seem that according to a YouTube support document, the company is now testing a timestamp button that allows users to leave comments at that particular point in the video.”

Techdirt: Ajit Pai’s FCC Does Something Good, Frees Wireless Spectrum The Auto Industry Had Done Little With

Techdirt: Ajit Pai’s FCC Does Something Good, Frees Wireless Spectrum The Auto Industry Had Done Little With. “Last week, the FCC quietly voted unanimously to add 45MHz of spectrum to Wi-Fi to public access, taking it away from an auto industry public safety initiative that failed to materialize over the last 20 years. Spectrum in the 5.850GHz to 5.925GHz range for several decades had been set aside for something called Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC), a vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications system that was supposed to warn drivers of traffic dangers.”

XDA Developers: Here are the shortcuts you can type into Google Chrome’s address bar

XDA Developers: Here are the shortcuts you can type into Google Chrome’s address bar. “When Google introduced Chrome 87, one of the exciting new features was called Chrome Actions. The feature makes it super easy to perform certain actions right from the browser’s address bar, rather than forcing users to clumsily dig through the browser’s settings menu. To help you utilize Chrome Actions, we’ve made a simple guide that highlights some of the actions you can take.”

Neowin: Amazon Sidewalk is coming to turn your network into Amazon’s

Neowin: Amazon Sidewalk is coming to turn your network into Amazon’s. “Today, Amazon started notifying Echo and Ring users of a new service that it’s rolling out this year called Sidewalk. Sidewalk is essentially a proprietary shared network that runs on top of your personal network. According to the company, it uses a ‘small portion of your Internet bandwidth’, although it obviously won’t help you out with your internet bill.”

CNET: Trump administration gives TikTok new extension in forced sale saga

CNET: Trump administration gives TikTok new extension in forced sale saga. “TikTok is getting more time to finalize a deal to sell the short-form video app. On Wednesday, TikTok’s parent company, ByteDance, received an extra week to sell its US operations. The short-video app also faced a potential US ban, but federal judges have blocked that from happening.”

New York Times: The New York Times is available to high school students and teachers across the United States — free.

New York Times: The New York Times is available to high school students and teachers across the United States — free.. “The mission of The New York Times — to seek the truth and help people understand the world — is critically important in this moment of upheaval. And as students and teachers head into an unprecedented school year, it’s essential that they have access to information that helps them understand what’s happening. That’s why The Times is working with Verizon to provide high school students and teachers with a free digital subscription through September 1, 2021 — helping them stay connected to the world, even as it continues to change.”

CNET: Mysterious monolith puzzle has been solved by internet sleuths

CNET: Mysterious monolith puzzle has been solved by internet sleuths. “A few days ago the internet went wild at the discovery of a metallic monolith mysteriously standing in the middle of the Utah desert. Discovered by the Utah’s Department of Public Safety, the rumor mill quickly began churning. Was it aliens? Has 2001: A Space Odyssey been brought to life? Thanks to some particularly devoted Reddit users, we now know that the likelihood of it being anything extraterrestrial is slim (though if it was going to happen, I think we can all agree that 2020 would have been the year).”

FOSS wins again: Free and Open Source Communities comes through on 19th Century Newspapers (and Books and Periodicals…) (Internet Archive Blog)

Internet Archive Blog: FOSS wins again: Free and Open Source Communities comes through on 19th Century Newspapers (and Books and Periodicals…). “I have never been more encouraged and thankful to Free and Open Source communities. Three months ago I posted a request for help with OCR’ing and processing 19th Century Newspapers and we got soooo many offers to help. Thank you, that was heart warming and concretely helpful– already based on these suggestions we are changing over our OCR and PDF software completely to FOSS, making big improvements, and building partnerships with FOSS developers in companies, universities, and as individuals that will propel the Internet Archive to have much better digitized texts.”

BetaNews: Want to get verified on Twitter? It could happen in 2021

BetaNews: Want to get verified on Twitter? It could happen in 2021. “Twitter’s verifications initiative ran into problems three years ago when it found itself under heavy criticism for awarding blue ticks to numerous controversial accounts. When 2021 rolls around, the company is planning to start verifying people who fall into various categories — government; companies, brands and organizations; news; entertainment; sports; and activists, organizers, and other influential individuals.”

Google Blog: “The Mandalorian” in AR? This is the way.

Google Blog: “The Mandalorian” in AR? This is the way. . “From dinosaurs to astronauts, Google has been bringing objects and creatures to life with augmented reality. Now, people using compatible Android 5G devices can interact with heroes from the Mandalorian in their own space.”

CNET: Twitter will begin warning you a tweet is misleading even if you’re just liking it

CNET: Twitter will begin warning you a tweet is misleading even if you’re just liking it. “Twitter is expanding its warnings for when you try to retweet a tweet labelled as being misleading. Now, even liking a labeled tweet will earn you a warning. According to the social media company, the prompts to read more info before retweeting has led to a 29% decrease in quoting misleading tweets.”

Google Blog: The new conversational Search experience we’re thankful for

Google Blog: The new conversational Search experience we’re thankful for. “This year, Google Search rolled out new ways to get you to the information you want, using context from your recent activity. Thanks to our newest language understanding capabilities, it’s now easier for you to get to a more specific, on-topic search, navigate a topic you’re interested in and find additional information relevant to that topic. Let’s check out how this improved understanding can help around this time of year.”

CNET: Google Assistant can set times for controlling internet-connected devices

CNET: Google Assistant can set times for controlling internet-connected devices. “Smart assistants like Google Assistant, Amazon’s Alexa and Apple’s Siri have been able to handle home automation tasks for years. In a new update, however, it now looks like at least Google’s virtual helper has recently been learning a new trick.”