Stanford News: Seven tips for spotting disinformation related to the Russia-Ukraine conflict

Stanford News: Seven tips for spotting disinformation related to the Russia-Ukraine conflict. “[Shelby] Grossman and her team are closely monitoring the narratives emerging on social media related to the crisis, including online propaganda from the Kremlin. A report of their initial findings published just two days before Russia launched a large-scale invasion of Ukraine. Grossman said that while they aren’t necessarily seeing new disinformation tactics, what’s new is how the tactics are being applied.”

Mashable: Sketchy domains try to trick Ukraine supporters out of would-be donations

Mashable: Sketchy domains try to trick Ukraine supporters out of would-be donations . “Scammers and other bad actors are once again up to their old tricks in search of ill-gotten profits, and this time they’ve set their sights on Ukraine. In order to take advantage of the ongoing war in the country, they’re using an old, reliable tool to trick internet users: Domain names.”

Duke University Libraries: Resources on the Russian Invasion of Ukraine

Duke University Libraries: Resources on the Russian Invasion of Ukraine. “As Duke University’s Librarian for Russian, Eurasian, and East European Studies, it is my professional responsibility to help patrons identify, locate, and access the scholarly resources that they need to study and teach about this region of the world. As a native of Odesa (Ukraine), the grandson of Holocaust survivors, and a first generation American, I also feel a personal sense of responsibility for helping the citizens of my adopted homeland to appreciate the gravity of the situation and work towards the peaceful resolution of Russia’s war against Ukraine.”

CNET: No, Ukrainians Aren’t Selling Captured Russian Tanks on eBay

CNET: No, Ukrainians Aren’t Selling Captured Russian Tanks on eBay. “Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has prompted countless news stories, memes and videos. But not every report is true. One image circulating on social media showed what was supposedly an eBay listing selling a Russian tank captured in Ukraine, priced at $400,000 (roughly £299,740, AU$546,000). Now urban-legends site Snopes has dug into the story behind the listing and revealed that the tank photo has been on the web for more than a decade, and isn’t from any current eBay listing.”

Washington Post: TikTok has long tried to stay out of politics. Russia’s invasion is making that harder.

Washington Post: TikTok has long tried to stay out of politics. Russia’s invasion is making that harder.. “TikTok’s executives spent the early days of the invasion noticeably quiet, omitting the words Ukraine and Russia in public statements and referring to the invasion as a ‘situation.’ As other companies, such as Facebook and Google, highlighted efforts to help Ukrainians shield their accounts from Russian surveillance and cyberattacks, TikTok has publicized no such program. On Thursday, TikTok started to catch up to its American social media rivals.”

Geek Wire: Seattle teen builds new website to aid Ukrainian refugees, two years after COVID-19 site took off

Geek Wire: Seattle teen builds new website to aid Ukrainian refugees, two years after COVID-19 site took off . “More than two years after starting a website to track the most current data related to the worldwide spread of the coronavirus, the 19-year-old from the Seattle area is turning his attention to the conflict raging in Ukraine. [Avi] Schiffmann has launched a new website called Ukraine Take Shelter, with the goal of helping scores of refugees impacted by the week-old Russian invasion find potential safe spaces to stay in neighboring countries and elsewhere.”

Reuters: Czech Group Shifts From Documenting Historical Nazi, Soviet Traumas to Aiding Ukraine’s Defence

Reuters: Czech Group Shifts From Documenting Historical Nazi, Soviet Traumas to Aiding Ukraine’s Defence. “Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has given new purpose to a Czech group, switching its focus from documenting memories of the past under Nazi and Soviet domination to supplying flak jackets, drones and helmets to Ukrainians defending their country…. Memory of Nations has run an online database of testimonies since 2008 documenting stories of people from when Czechs and Slovaks lived under Nazi occupation during World War Two or four decades of Soviet-dominated Communist rule that ended in 1989.”

‘Bot holiday’: Covid disinformation down as social media pivot to Ukraine (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Bot holiday’: Covid disinformation down as social media pivot to Ukraine. “Russia’s information war with western nations seems to be pivoting to new fronts, from vaccines to geopolitics. And while social media has proven a powerful tool for Ukraine – with images of Zelenskiy striding through the streets of Kyiv and tractors pulling abandoned Russian tanks – growing campaigns of misinformation around the world could change the conflict’s narrative, and the ways the world reacts.”

The Atlantic: The Ugly, Embarrassing Spectacle of ‘Milling’ Around Online

The Atlantic: The Ugly, Embarrassing Spectacle of ‘Milling’ Around Online. “We are all just chattering away in restless and confused excitement as we try to figure out how to think about what’s happening. We want to understand which outcomes are most likely, and whether we might be obligated to help—by giving money or vowing not to share misinformation or learning the entire history of global conflict so as to avoid saying the wrong thing. We are milling.”

The Verge: Wikimedia says it ‘will not back down’ after Russia threatens Wikipedia block

The Verge: Wikimedia says it ‘will not back down’ after Russia threatens Wikipedia block. “The Wikimedia Foundation has issued a statement supporting Russian Wikipedia volunteers after a censorship demand from internet regulators. On Tuesday, tech and communications regulator Roskomnadzor threatened to block Wikipedia over the Russian-language page covering Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, claiming it contained ‘false messages’ about war casualties and the effects of economic sanctions, among other things.”

Airwars: Airwars launches interactive Ukraine population density map

Airwars: Airwars launches interactive Ukraine population density map. “Airwars has launched an interactive population density map of Ukraine, providing vital support for researchers and others seeking to understand the human impact of the war…. The data, sourced by the WorldPop initiative from different academic institutions, dates from before Russia began its invasion of Ukraine on February 24th.”