Zik: Czech Republic launches project in Lviv to digitalize SBU archives

Zik: Czech Republic launches project in Lviv to digitalize SBU archives. “SBU Lviv branch director Oleksandr Tkachuk said the digitalized archives will help researchers and public to get acquainted with NKVD and KGB practices. Under the law On Access to Communist Regime Archives, many of the documents will become available in Ukraine. However, Russia still keeps the bulk of KGB archives giving them a classified status, he said.” I believe in this case that SBU stands for the Security Service of Ukraine.

Science Blog: Digital Map Helps Historians Get Granular With Holocaust Research

Science Blog: Digital Map Helps Historians Get Granular With Holocaust Research. “Looking at the list of names on Waitman Beorn’s computer screen is staggering. The eye blurs almost automatically as it searches through the 18,000 people – recorded by name, approximate birthdate and address – on the list compiled by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Yet, these 18,000 are only a small fraction of the nearly 160,000 Jews who were placed into forced labor or systematically murdered under the brutal Nazi rule in Lviv, Ukraine.”

Euromaidan Press: Huge genealogical database of Ukrainians born in 1650–1920 opens online

Euromaidan Press: Huge genealogical database of Ukrainians born in 1650–1920 opens online. “The database includes 2.56 mn people and is expected to reach 4 to 5 mn in 2019. The access to its contents is and will remain free of charge. The sources of data are manifold: birth registers, fiscal and parish censuses, lists of nobility, voters, the military, and victims of repressions, address directories, and other documents produced under the Tsardom of Muscovy, Russian and Habsburg Empires, Poland and the Soviet Union. A Roman-letter version of the data index is reportedly to be enabled in the coming months.” The home page was in Ukrainian, but Google Translate handled it okay.

Reuters: Russian social media site tells Ukrainians how to dodge web block

Access arms race. Reuters: Russian social media site tells Ukrainians how to dodge web block. “Vkontakte, the Russian version of Facebook, on Wednesday sent its millions of Ukrainian users instructions on how to circumvent a ban by the Ukrainian government. Kiev on Tuesday forbade Ukrainian web hosts to provide access to popular Russian social networks, part of a package of restrictions on Russian internet firms that it said was intended to guard against cyber threats.”

ABC News: Ukraine to block access to Russia’s social media websites

ABC News: Ukraine to block access to Russia’s social media websites. “In another round of sanctions in response to Russia’s annexation of Crimea, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko on Monday ordered the blocking of access to Russia’s most popular social media websites and search engines. Poroshenko’s office on Tuesday published the decree that he signed a day earlier, freezing the assets and banning the operations of hundreds of Russian companies in Ukraine. The decree also calls for blocking access to dozens of Russia’s most popular websites for three years, including the search engine Yandex, social media network VKontakte and the email provider Mail.ru. All of them have a substantial audience in Ukraine.”

RadioFreeEurope: Two Years On, No Second Thoughts On Opening Ukraine’s KGB Archives ‘To Everyone’

RadioFreeEurope: Two Years On, No Second Thoughts On Opening Ukraine’s KGB Archives ‘To Everyone’. “Just over two years ago, on April 9, 2015, Ukraine’s parliament adopted a historic law on opening up the country’s Soviet-era secret-police archives. In the new law’s first full year in effect, requests for information and access boomed by 138 percent.”

Now Available: Digital Archive of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies

Now available: a digital archive of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies. “… the Digital Archive Project of the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies (CIUS) aims to digitize, systematize and describe the core publications of the institute that have been produced over the last 40 years – essentially, since its founding in 1976. All of the digitized materials are part of the open access University of Alberta Library collections and are freely available online. The CIUS Digital Archive Project website has a search system, which operates on basic criteria such as type of document, year of publication, author, subject, scholarly discipline and chronological coverage.”

Income and Assets of Ukrainian Lawmakers and Officials in New Online Database

A new database provides information on the income and assets of Ukrainian officials. “Tens of thousands of Ukrainian officials and lawmakers have disclosed their incomes and assets in a publicly available database for the first time. Late Sunday was the deadline by which all Ukrainian officials were due to declare expensive possessions and assets held in their own and their families’ names in what is commonly known in Ukraine as an e-declaration. Some Ukrainian politicians complained about filling in the elaborate forms for hours, and several lawmakers didn’t meet the deadline.”

GlobalVoices: Ukrainian Ministry of Information Policy Thanks Facebook Bots for Their Hard Work

We live in a world with new, strange battlefields. Ukrainian Ministry of Information Policy Thanks Facebook Bots for Their Hard Work. “On Tuesday, Mikhail Degtyarev, an MP from the far-right Liberal Democratic Party of Russia, sent a letter to Minister of Telecom and Mass Communications Nikolai Nikiforov requesting that action be taken against Ukrainian bots he said are unfairly targeting Russian-language Facebook users. In a tweet responding to the news, an arm of the Ukrainian government’s Ministry of Information Policy seemed to thank those responsible for creating the bots.”

Google Maps Reverses Decision on Crimea Place Names

Google/Google Maps has reversed its decision on place names in the Crimea. “The traditional Soviet names for Crimean settlements had been restored Friday. The town of Kirovskoe had been listed as Islam-Terek, and the village Krasnogvardeiskoe as Ichki. Along with several other settlements, these towns once again bear their Soviet names on Google Maps.”

Google Maps Caught Up in Ukraine-Russia Conflict

Google Maps is getting caught up in the conflict between Ukraine and Russia. “Russian officials have condemned tech-giant Google for updating its online map of the Crimea with new names decided by the Ukrainian government. The company has updated its maps in of the peninsula in accordance with a new Ukrainian de-communization law designed to modernize the country’s Communist-era place names, the RBC news website reported Thursday.”

Ukraine Working to Put Soviet-Era KGB Materials Online

Ukraine is working to put Soviet KGB materials online. “While the Czech Republic is about to publish an internet database of 300 thousand scanned communist-era security service documents, Ukraine is undergoing a revision of its KGB archives in order to create, like the Czech Republic, a single open-access archive – The National Memory Archive.”

Dear Google Translate: Russia Is Not Mordor

Fun with Google Translate: No, Russia is not Mordor. “The California company was forced to explain on Tuesday why translations of certain words from Ukrainian into Russian gave users controversially—and sometimes hilariously—inaccurate results. For some, a translation of the words Russian Federation from Ukrainian into Russian returned the word Mordor, the evil fictional realm in J.R.R Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. Pro-Ukrainian groups have taken to using the term when referring to Russia.”