PR Newswire: MeWe Launches Social Media’s First Dual-Camera Videos: “MeWe’s® ” (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: MeWe Launches Social Media’s First Dual-Camera Videos: “MeWe’s® “ (PRESS RELEASE). “As people across the globe are staying indoors, self-quarantined due to Coronavirus, MeWe, the rapidly growing Facebook competitor, launches MeWe’s® – the first dual-camera videos available on any social network. MeWe’s are the perfect way for people to stay virtually connected in a fun and safe way with their friends and family.”

Stanford News: People’s uncertainty about the novel coronavirus can lead them to believe misinformation, says Stanford scholar

Stanford News: People’s uncertainty about the novel coronavirus can lead them to believe misinformation, says Stanford scholar. “As people increasingly social distance themselves to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus, social media is an appealing way to stay in contact with friends, family and colleagues. But it can also be a source of misinformation and bad advice – some of it even dangerously wrong.”

EurekAlert: Using social media to understand the vaccine debate in China

EurekAlert: Using social media to understand the vaccine debate in China. “Vaccine acceptance is a crucial public health issue, which has been exacerbated by the use of social media to spread content expressing vaccine hesitancy. Studies have shown that social media can provide new information regarding the dynamics of vaccine communication online, potentially affecting real-world vaccine behaviors. A team of United States-based researchers observed an example of this in 2018 related to the Changchun Changsheng Biotechnology vaccine incident in China.”

The Next Web: After nearly 6 months, Kashmir’s internet opens up – but only to 300 sites

The Next Web: After nearly 6 months, Kashmir’s internet opens up – but only to 300 sites. “After enduring the longest internet shutdown in a democracy, people in Kashmir are being allowed back online, but with major restrictions. On January 15, the state authorities allowed limited 2G access and broadband access to select institutes in a few areas. Over the weekend, it issued orders to restore 2G internet access to 301 sites across the region of Jammu and Kashmir, including a handful of news outlets. Just 301.”

Techdirt: Germany Wants To Limit Memes And Mashups Derived From Press Publishers’ Material To 128-by-128 Pixels In Resolution, And Three Seconds In Length

Techdirt: Germany Wants To Limit Memes And Mashups Derived From Press Publishers’ Material To 128-by-128 Pixels In Resolution, And Three Seconds In Length. “Last month, Mike wrote about France’s awful proposals for implementing the EU Copyright Directive’s upload filter (originally known as Article 13, but Article 17 in the final version). Just as France was the most vocal proponent of this dangerous development, so Germany was the main driving force behind the ancillary copyright requirement, also known as the snippet or link tax. And like France, Germany has managed to make its proposed national implementation (original in German) of what was Article 11, now Article 15, even worse than the general framework handed down by the EU.” THIS NEVER WORKS!

UC Santa Barbara: Take It or Leave It

UC Santa Barbara: Take It or Leave It. “Of California’s 23 federal offshore platforms, many are nearing the end of their lives, and regulators need to decide what to do with the underwater superstructures. Some advocate removing the platforms in their entirety, while others propose leaving their support structures in place to continue acting as human-made reefs. In an effort to inform this discussion, a group of researchers led by scientists at UC Santa Barbara has produced 11 studies in a dedicated issue of the Bulletin of Marine Science outlining the ecology of the state’s oil platforms. They’ve also compiled a searchable database of studies on platform ecology carried out worldwide.”

Undark: 3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Bones

Undark: 3D Printing and the Murky Ethics of Replicating Bones . “TEN YEARS AGO, it wasn’t possible for most people to use 3D technology to print authentic copies of human bones. Today, using a 3D printer and digital scans of actual bones, it is possible to create unlimited numbers of replica bones — each curve and break and tiny imperfection intact — relatively inexpensively. The technology is increasingly allowing researchers to build repositories of bone data, which they can use to improve medical procedures, map how humans have evolved, and even help show a courtroom how someone died. But the proliferation of faux bones also poses an ethical dilemma — and one that, prior to the advent of accessible 3D printing, was mostly limited to museum collections containing skeletons of dubious provenance.”