Digital Trends: How to watch the 2018 FIFA World Cup online

Digital Trends: How to watch the 2018 FIFA World Cup online. “Beginning June 14, the world’s best soccer players (and most rabid fans) will convene in Russia for the 2018 FIFA World Cup. It’s by far the biggest sporting event in the world — over a billion people tuned in live to watch the 2014 World Cup finals match in Brazil. Chances are, you’re one of those fans — or at least curious what all the hype is about. We’ll help you figure out the best way for you to watch the 2018 FIFA World Cup online.” SPOILER ALERT: Cable is your best bet.

BetaNews: Watch Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony to the EU in a livestream

BetaNews: Watch Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony to the EU in a livestream. “Having previously refused to answer questions in the UK, last week Mark Zuckerberg agreed to appear in front of the EU parliament to speak about Facebook’s use of data. The Facebook chief is due to appear in front of MEPs tomorrow, Tuesday, and European Parliament President Antonio Tajani has announced that the appearance will be livestreamed. So, if you fancy tuning in to see what Zuckerberg has to say and how he is able to ‘clarify issues related to the use of personal data’, you will be able to do just that.”

PSNews: Google goes bush with ACT walking tracks

PSNews: Google goes bush with ACT walking tracks. “Canberra’s walking tracks can now be enjoyed by anyone in the world following 350kms of them being added to the international Google Street View platform…. [Mick Gentleman] said highlights included views from Mount Ainslie, Mount Majura, Mount Painter, Mount Franklin, Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve, the Molonglo River, and the Honeysuckle Creek and Orroral Valley tracking stations.” Mick Gentleman is a TERRIFIC name.

BetaNews: Critical vulnerability found in Windows Remote Desktop Protocol

BetaNews: Critical vulnerability found in Windows Remote Desktop Protocol. “Researchers at threat prevention specialist Preempt have discovered a flaw in Credential Security Support Provider protocol (CredSSP), which is used by Remote Desktop and WinRM in their authentication processes. An attacker with man-in-the-middle control over the session could use this to gain the ability to remotely run code on the compromised server masquerading as a legitimate user.”

Fordham News: Getting Through to Google

Fordham News: Getting Through to Google. “It’s widely known in cyber circles that, when the Arab Spring protests happened in Egypt in 2011, website blockage escalated: Certain governments try to control the information flowing into and out of their countries for political and other reasons. But exactly when and where such censorship is being done has proven hard to measure. Now, researchers from the University of Michigan are enlisting 400,000 servers around the world to monitor censorship and network interference. Their project is called Censored Planet.”

Newsweek: Trump’s Tweets Show Why Social Media Could Hurt Democracy

Newsweek: Trump’s Tweets Show Why Social Media Could Hurt Democracy. “…the president’s retweets should lead us to ask a deeper question: whether social media, including Twitter, might be corrosive to the very fabric of democracy itself. This wasn’t the first time Trump used his Twitter account to amplify hate speech or propagate obvious falsehoods. He has routinely tweeted absurd theories that would blow a 2.0 on any informational breathalyzer: for instance, his infamous claim that 3 million undocumented immigrants voted in the 2016 election—an idea he got online from a total crackpot, and which remains bereft of a single shred of evidence.”

Johns Hopkins News-Letter: How social media influences culture and language

Johns Hopkins News-Letter: How social media influences culture and language. “The creation of AS.300.304, aka ‘Hopkins/Memes/Lost Hopes and Dreams,’ seems to embody the influence that internet culture has had on our generation. As college students, we’re connected to the internet almost every second of every day, whether it be through social media sites like Snapchat and Facebook or through more academically-related pages like Blackboard. Accordingly, this has significantly shaped the ways in which we speak and act in everyday life.”