PSNews: Google goes bush with ACT walking tracks

PSNews: Google goes bush with ACT walking tracks. “Canberra’s walking tracks can now be enjoyed by anyone in the world following 350kms of them being added to the international Google Street View platform…. [Mick Gentleman] said highlights included views from Mount Ainslie, Mount Majura, Mount Painter, Mount Franklin, Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve, the Molonglo River, and the Honeysuckle Creek and Orroral Valley tracking stations.” Mick Gentleman is a TERRIFIC name.

BetaNews: Critical vulnerability found in Windows Remote Desktop Protocol

BetaNews: Critical vulnerability found in Windows Remote Desktop Protocol. “Researchers at threat prevention specialist Preempt have discovered a flaw in Credential Security Support Provider protocol (CredSSP), which is used by Remote Desktop and WinRM in their authentication processes. An attacker with man-in-the-middle control over the session could use this to gain the ability to remotely run code on the compromised server masquerading as a legitimate user.”

Fordham News: Getting Through to Google

Fordham News: Getting Through to Google. “It’s widely known in cyber circles that, when the Arab Spring protests happened in Egypt in 2011, website blockage escalated: Certain governments try to control the information flowing into and out of their countries for political and other reasons. But exactly when and where such censorship is being done has proven hard to measure. Now, researchers from the University of Michigan are enlisting 400,000 servers around the world to monitor censorship and network interference. Their project is called Censored Planet.”

Newsweek: Trump’s Tweets Show Why Social Media Could Hurt Democracy

Newsweek: Trump’s Tweets Show Why Social Media Could Hurt Democracy. “…the president’s retweets should lead us to ask a deeper question: whether social media, including Twitter, might be corrosive to the very fabric of democracy itself. This wasn’t the first time Trump used his Twitter account to amplify hate speech or propagate obvious falsehoods. He has routinely tweeted absurd theories that would blow a 2.0 on any informational breathalyzer: for instance, his infamous claim that 3 million undocumented immigrants voted in the 2016 election—an idea he got online from a total crackpot, and which remains bereft of a single shred of evidence.”

Johns Hopkins News-Letter: How social media influences culture and language

Johns Hopkins News-Letter: How social media influences culture and language. “The creation of AS.300.304, aka ‘Hopkins/Memes/Lost Hopes and Dreams,’ seems to embody the influence that internet culture has had on our generation. As college students, we’re connected to the internet almost every second of every day, whether it be through social media sites like Snapchat and Facebook or through more academically-related pages like Blackboard. Accordingly, this has significantly shaped the ways in which we speak and act in everyday life.”

Digital Trends: New Facebook Messenger tool could let businesses broadcast mass chat messages

Digital Trends: New Facebook Messenger tool could let businesses broadcast mass chat messages. “Businesses could soon use Facebook Messenger to send you automated, mass-delivered messages. First spotted by The Next Web’s Matt Navarra, Facebook recently confirmed that it is privately testing Messenger Broadcast, a platform that would allow businesses to send mass messages — though only to Messenger users that have already initiated a conversation.” Ugh.

BuzzFeed: Facebook’s 2016 Election Team Gave Advertisers A Blueprint To A Divided US

BuzzFeed: Facebook’s 2016 Election Team Gave Advertisers A Blueprint To A Divided US. “During the 2016 election season, Facebook provided political advertisers with a targetable breakdown of a fractured United States, which could’ve been used as a blueprint for exploiting the country’s divisions. According to a political advertising sales pitch obtained by BuzzFeed News, Facebook carved the US electorate into 14 segments — from left-leaning ‘youthful urbanites’ to a pro-NRA, pro–Tea Party group it bizarrely labeled as ‘the great outdoors.’ It detailed their demographic information — including religion and race in some cases — and offered them to political advertisers via Facebook’s sales teams. For advertisers using Facebook’s self-serve platform, the segments could be reached by purchasing larger bundles ranging from ‘very liberal’ to ‘very conservative.'”