Chrome Extension Lets You Mute Election News

This sounds awesome! A Chrome extension lets you mute mentions of the 2016 US elections. “The aptly-named ‘I haven’t got time for the ‘Paign’ is basic, but effective: it automatically scrubs popular news sites like the New York Times, Slate and The Atlantic of campaign news and tells you how many articles were hidden.”

How to turn your Windows 10 upgrade files into an ISO disk image

Handy article from Ed Bott: How to turn your Windows 10 upgrade files into an ISO disk image — “One question I’ve been asked more than any other in recent weeks is whether Microsoft will release Windows 10 in ISO format. No one outside Redmond knows yet, but in the meantime there’s an option: Make your own ISO files. Here’s how. [Updated with product keys for Preview builds 10158 and 10159]”

Web Tool Lets You “Deep Dream” Your Photos

Useful-for-a-given-value-of-useful: Google made a tool that trippified photos, then it open sourced that tool. Now thanks to Zain Shah you can try to “Deep Dream” tool for yourself. Note this article warns that the site is very, very slow in responding. I had the same experience; I suspect it’s getting a lot of traffic.

Ubergizmo: How to Download Your Facebook Photos

From Ubergizmo: How to download your Facebook photos. “Fortunately, Facebook makes it quite easy to download photos. You can easily download a single photo or all of your photos right from your Facebook profile. However, there is always some space for improvement and with the help of Third-party tools you can gain some great control over what you can download. In this tutorial, we are going to show you how you can download a single photo, an Album or all of your Facebook photos.”

Microsoft Open-Sources WorldWide Telescope

Microsoft has open-sourced WorldWide Telescope. “WorldWide Telescope began in 2007 as a Microsoft Research project, with early partners including astronomers and educators from Caltech, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Northwestern, the University of Chicago and several NASA facilities. Over the past eight years, millions of people have downloaded and used WorldWide Telescope, coming to rely on its unified astronomical image and data environment for exploratory research, teaching and public outreach.”

Super Searcher Tricks from MEB

From the always-awesome Mary Ellen Bates, a couple of super searcher tricks. One of the tricks she mentions is restricting search to .gov sites only. If you want to search just government sites but want to search a slightly larger data pool than just .gov, check out this Google custom search engine I put together that restricts results to government Web sites (but it uses .gov and .us, so it’s got more resources to search. You can also narrow your results by city or county if the mood takes you.)

TNW on Interesting Twitter Chats

The Next Web has a roundup of 10 interesting Twitter chats. They seem to be mostly social media oriented. Which reminds me, as long as I’m complaining about things it’s hard to search for, let’s talk live Google Hangouts. Does anyone know of a good directory/calendar of live Google Hangouts? I know Google has a list of what’s live now, but I’m thinking about something where I can say, “Oh, I have a little time Friday, let’s see what’s going on.” I know I spend most of my time under this desk, but occasionally interacting with other humans has its appeal.

Using Twitter to Detect Earthquakes

Interesting: using Twitter to detect earthquakes. “The Tweet Earthquake Dispatch (TED) system uses an API that compiles tweets based on keywords such as “earthquake” and its equivalent in multiple languages. Specifically, the API searches for significant increases in tweets containing the keywords. In addition to searching for keywords, the API has parameters to remove tweets that are more than 7 words, contain numbers, the ‘@’ symbol and words such as ‘http,’ ‘predict,’ ‘drill,’ and ‘song’ to eliminate tweets that are not related to an actual earthquake.” There’s also a Twitter account you can follow to get earthquake information.

The Edublogger: How to Embed Just About Anything

Nice roundup from The Edublogger: how to embed just about anything. “Embedding videos, photos, or other types of content in your blog posts is a relatively simple way to enhance your posts with informative, attention-grabbing content. In this round up post, we’ll share posts from the Edublogs community (and beyond) explaining how to embed just about anything into your blog!”