VentureBeat: WordPress 5.0 arrives with block-based editor, new default theme, and developer features

VentureBeat: WordPress 5.0 arrives with block-based editor, new default theme, and developer features. “WordPress 5.0 introduces a block-based editor that offers a streamlined editing experience. The new editor is supposed to be better at inserting media content and rearranging any type of content. Each piece of content is in its own block, which is meant to help site owners decide how content is displayed. Blocks include everything from paragraphs, headings, and quotes to images, galleries, and videos.”

Disappearing movies and games: How safe is your digital collection? (The Age)

The Age: Disappearing movies and games: How safe is your digital collection?. “It’s not just video content, either. We’ve also gone digital in a big way for music (only 25 per cent of revenue in 2017 was from physical formats like vinyl and CD) and interactive electronic games (just one dollar in every five comes from actual disc sales). Only books are bucking the trend, with e-books accounting for less than a fifth of the market. You don’t have to be a devotee of Marie Kondo – author of the 2014 bestseller The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up – to see why. Digital libraries are just so much neater, tidier, more space-efficient. But are they as safe?”

World War I: A Wartime Clipping Service Update: All 400 Volumes Now Online (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: World War I: A Wartime Clipping Service Update: All 400 Volumes Now Online. “The massive collection, World War History: Newspaper Clippings, 1914 to 1926, is now fully digitized and freely available on the Library of Congress website. The 79,621 pages are packed with war-related front pages, illustrated feature articles, editorial cartoons, and more. You can search by keywords, browse the content chronologically, and download pages.”

TechCrunch: The nation-state of the internet

TechCrunch: The nation-state of the internet. “The internet is a community, but can it be a nation-state? It’s a question that I have been pondering on and off this year, what with the rise of digital nomads and the deeply libertarian ethos baked into parts of the blockchain community. It’s clearly on a lot of other people’s minds as well: when we interviewed Matt Howard of Norwest on Equity a few weeks back, he noted (unprompted) that Uber is one of the few companies that could reach ‘nation-state’ status when it IPOs. Clearly, the internet is home to many, diverse communities of similar-minded people, but how do those communities transmute from disparate bands into a nation-state?”

Engadget: ‘Aftermath’ is a 360-degree walkthrough of the Camp Fire devastation

Engadget: ‘Aftermath’ is a 360-degree walkthrough of the Camp Fire devastation. “Camp Fire, the tragedy that killed at least 85 victims and destroyed around 14,000 homes across Paradise, California, continues to torment as residents start returning to the ruin as of yesterday. News channels around the world have been offering a sober look at what little is left behind the walls of fire, but not long after disaster struck, former Lytro exec Steve Cooper already sensed the need to capture a proper first-hand account of this unprecedented catastrophic event.”

British Library: Introducing an experimental format for learning about content mining for digital scholarship

British Library: Introducing an experimental format for learning about content mining for digital scholarship. “This post by the British Library’s Digital Curator for Western Heritage Collections, Dr Mia Ridge, reports on an experimental format designed to provide more flexible and timely training on fast-moving topics like text and data mining.”

University of Arkansas Little Rock: UA Little Rock Completes Digitization Of History Of Segregation, Integration Of Arkansas Schools

University of Arkansas Little Rock: UA Little Rock Completes Digitization Of History Of Segregation, Integration Of Arkansas Schools. “As a result of this project, a unique group of archival collections are now easily accessible online to students and scholars of civil rights, race, education, and the law, as well as the general public. Anyone around the world now has the opportunity to study the evolution of education in Central Arkansas through the lens of religion, the judicial system, and contemporary students and educators. In addition to the more than 350,000 digital files now available online, CAHC has also published a virtual exhibit featuring digital objects from the project along with a timeline, lesson plans, and short essays by scholars.”