Git money, git paid: GitHub waves larger wads of dollar bills to tempt bug hunters (The Register)

The Register: Git money, git paid: GitHub waves larger wads of dollar bills to tempt bug hunters . “Social code storage biz GitHub, now a ward of Microsoft, on Tuesday divulged plans to make itself more attractive to hackers by flashing larger sums of cash and offering better indemnity.”

ABC News (Australia): Why large swathes of countries are censored on Google Maps

ABC News (Australia): Why large swathes of countries are censored on Google Maps. “From self-driving cars to smart bins, global satellite positioning (GPS) is fundamentally changing the world around us, but as more of Earth becomes accessible from our keyboards, there are a number of groups who want to swat prying eyes away.”

Linfield College: Oregon Wine History Archive debuts new projects

Linfield College: Oregon Wine History Archive debuts new projects . “The Oregon Wine History Archive (OWHA) at Linfield College has three new projects covering various aspects of Oregon winemaking and winemakers available on its website to the general public. The first is a series of themed oral history videos showcasing common themes in the Oregon wine industry. The series consists of 209 videos on 26 different topics, such as ‘Advice to Newcomers,’ ‘All About Pinot Noir’ and ‘Oregon Wine’s Pioneer Spirit.’ The videos were funded by the Oregon Wine Board, Oregon Heritage Commission and the Oregon Cultural Trust, and are freely available to promote the wine industry. “

Bloomberg Quint: Google Takes New Policy Approach Amid Growing Global Threats

Bloomberg Quint: Google Takes New Policy Approach Amid Growing Global Threats. “Alphabet Inc.’s Google is reorganizing its approach to global policy, including the addition of resources to emerging markets, according to a person familiar with the moves, which come as the internet giant faces new threats and regulations around the world. In an internal email, the company’s new global policy chief, Karan Bhatia, described the reorganization as a reaction to policy makers who are increasingly empowered to regulate the company’s core businesses, said the person, who asked not to be identified discussing personnel decisions.”

WARC: Internet in decline beyond Google and Facebook

WARC: Internet in decline beyond Google and Facebook. “Total internet advertising spend – including desktop, mobile, and tablet – will decline by 7.2% this year, if you take the Google and Facebook ‘duopoly’ out of the equation…. Combined, the duopoly’s share of the global online ad market is expected to rise to 61.4% (up from 56.4% in 2018), with combined ad income forecast to reach $176.4 billion – an increase of 22%.”

CNET: Google Earth offers interactive journey in honor of Black History Month

CNET: Google Earth offers interactive journey in honor of Black History Month. “Google wants you to learn more about how black culture has shaped American history. Google Earth has made an interactive map in honor of Black History Month in collaboration with the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and The Moorland-Spingarn Research Center at Howard University. The journey shines light on how black history has shaped the American experience in areas like advocacy, business, film, TV, education and technology.”

Futurism: This Site Uses Deep Learning to Generate Fake Airbnb Listings

I’m not sure how useful this is, but it’s fascinating. Futurism: This Site Uses Deep Learning to Generate Fake Airbnb Listings. “A new website called This Airbnb Does Not Exist uses machine learning to whip up plausible-yet-slightly-incoherent apartment listings — from a description to ersatz photos of the interior. The site’s creator, Christopher Schmidt, was inspired by This Person Does Not Exist, another recent viral site that uses a neural network to generate photos of nonexistent people. Schmidt trained This Airbnb Does Not Exist’s image generator using a dataset of apartment interiors and its text generator using actual Airbnb listings. The result: fully furnished figments of the digital imagination.” Also gloriously weird.