Phys.org : Archival photos offer research value

Phys.org: Archival photos offer research value. “Launched just six weeks ago, Smapshot is a public web portal on which anyone can geotag aerial photographs of Switzerland from the 1960s. They superimpose the provided photos onto a virtual map of contemporary Switzerland that was built from data provided by the Federal Office of Topography (Swisstopo). Users can then add anecdotes about the location, provide additional topographical information, chat with other users and share their discoveries on Facebook. And as thanks for their help, they are allowed to print the archival photo that they geotagged.”

PCWorld: How to keep a private stash of bookmarks in Chrome

PCWorld: How to keep a private stash of bookmarks in Chrome. “Incognito Mode in Chrome can keep your browsing history secret unless you have a nosy Internet Service Provider, and you’re not using a VPN. But one thing incognito doesn’t keep secret are any bookmarks you’ve got. If you’ve ever wanted to keep a private collection of bookmarks the Chrome extension Hush is one solution.”

TechCrunch: Twitter introduces pre-roll ads to Periscope videos

TechCrunch: Twitter introduces pre-roll ads to Periscope videos. “Twitter is announcing a new ad unit — pre-roll ads on Periscope videos. In a blog post, Periscope Group Project Manager Mike Folgner says the ads will appear in a way that’s ‘organic to how people already consume that content on the platform.’ Basically, publishers will have the option to run a short video ad that plays before you watch their Periscope videos (both live broadcasts and replays) on Twitter.”

Engadget: An AI taught me to be a better tweeter

Engadget: An AI taught me to be a better tweeter. “Twitter is an extension of my subconscious, a pressure valve that lets half-baked thoughts escape my mind. In the last seven years, I’ve tweeted 73,811 times, and yet none of those 140-character messages has made me internet-famous. For all my efforts, I’ve accrued just 5,635 followers, most of whom are in tech and were probably made to follow me by their boss. It seems that no matter how much I try, I’m never going to become a celebrity tweeter.”

Just google it: The student project that changed the world (BBC)

BBC: Just google it: The student project that changed the world. “Google dominates the search market, handling close to 90% of searches worldwide. Many businesses rely on ranking highly in its organic search results. And Google constantly tweaks the algorithm that decides them. Google gives general advice about how to do well, but it is not transparent about how it ranks results – not least because that would give away the information necessary to game the system. We would be back to searching for cars and getting porn.” I do not agree with everything in this article – actually I yelled at the monitor a couple of times – but it’s a good backgrounder.

Techdirt: Twitter Reports On Government Agencies Using ‘Report Tweet’ Function To Block Terrorism-Related Content

Techdirt: Twitter Reports On Government Agencies Using ‘Report Tweet’ Function To Block Terrorism-Related Content. “For the last six months of 2016, Twitter received reports on nearly 6,000 accounts from a total of 716 reports by government agencies. The numbers aren’t broken down any further than that, so there’s no telling which governments are utilizing this reporting system most. All Twitter is reporting is that less than 2% of account suspensions are the result of government reports and that it’s refused to act on 15% of government-reported accounts. Each account is counted only once, even if there are multiple reports or multiple tweets reported by government agencies.”