Federal Physician Database Has Incorrect Data

A database set up by the government to provide information on physicians apparently has incorrect data in it. “Most physicians are legally required to get what’s called a National Provider Identifier, a unique, 10-digit number assigned to them by the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, or CMS. Patients can search those numbers in an online database, which also includes physicians’ state license numbers. It’s those license numbers that are the problem: They’re wrong in tens of thousands of cases, an Enquirer investigation has found.” Good grief. Tens of thousands?

New World War I Digital Archive

There’s a new archive available telling the stories of families who went through World War I. “The Army Children of the First World War project was set up as a digital archive to tell the stories of ordinary people who lived through the 1914-1918 conflict. The aim was to inspire both young and old to connect with the events of a century ago. Those behind the site have stuck to their promise of uploading a new image every week and few months on the website is packed with images and postcards written by soldiers on the frontline and sent back to loved ones in Leeds.”

NoScript Browser Extension Has Security Issue

Do you use NoScript to keep Firefox secure? If you do, you need to update it immediately – it has a serious security vulnerability. “The attack works because NoScript has a limited whitelist of trusted domains, allowing the host browser to load commonly-used tools from certain content delivery networks like googleapis.com. This feature tries to preserve websites’ functionality while simultaneously blocking any potentially malicious code.”

Japanese Internment Camp Documents to Be Digitized

Japanese internment camp archives held at San Jose State University and other California Universities will be digitized. “Over the next two years, San Jose State and 14 other campuses in the California State University system will be digitizing 10,000 documents into a searchable database called the CSU Japanese American History Digitization Project.”

Reddit Moderators Revolt

Wow, Reddit has kind of blown up, with moderators revolting over the firing of an employee and other recent changes to site policy. “The protest has taken place largely in the form of user protests and moderators making several major subreddits private. When a subreddit is made private, only a select few are able to access it in any fashion. This means the subreddit is effectively closed to public and search engines alike, displaying a lockout page not unlike a 404. As the situation is rapidly advancing, the list of subreddits partaking in the protest is bound to change, but the largest and most common subreddits appear to be showing solidarity in the protest. If one were to visit Reddit’s front page right now, you would note the disappearance of /r/Art, /r/gaming, /r/history, /r/science, /r/Music, /r/books, and many others.”

Microsoft Open-Sources WorldWide Telescope

Microsoft has open-sourced WorldWide Telescope. “WorldWide Telescope began in 2007 as a Microsoft Research project, with early partners including astronomers and educators from Caltech, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Northwestern, the University of Chicago and several NASA facilities. Over the past eight years, millions of people have downloaded and used WorldWide Telescope, coming to rely on its unified astronomical image and data environment for exploratory research, teaching and public outreach.”

Cleveland Jewish News Now Available for Free

It’s not a new resource per se; the new bit is that it doesn’t cost anything. The Cleveland Jewish News digital archive is now available for free. “On July 1, the Cleveland Jewish News unlocked its Digital Archive, making every story, photograph and advertisement available at the push of a few buttons….Issues of the CJN will be made publicly available online 90 days after publication. CJN digital edition subscribers have immediate access to all content as it is published.” I had to provide my name and e-mail to access, but I didn’t have to set up an account or anything.

Evernote Web Clipper Can Save GMail Attachments

The Evernote Web Clipper extension can now save GMail attachments. “Popular note-taking service Evernote has released an update for its Web Clipper browser extension which now allows users to save Gmail messages that have attachments to their accounts so that they can easily bring them up later again when required. The update also adds more new functionality to the browser extension making it much more useful, and since it’s available for multiple browsers millions of users can take advantage of the features that it offers.”

Costolo Says New Twitter CEO Will Face Complex Challenges

Former Twitter CEO says Twitter’s new CEO will face “complex challenges”. Gee, you think? “Speaking to the Guardian before his last day at the company on Tuesday, Dick Costolo said that while Twitter had grown revenue by 97% year on year to $1.7bn (£1.1bn), the pressure placed on the company obscured its other achievements in bringing 302 million monthly active users on to the service.”

Custom Maps in Google Drive

You can now share, manage, and create custom maps from Google Drive. “Whether you’re planning your next event, mapping out the best route to visit clients, or sharing the location of your food truck with fans, Google My Maps makes it easy to put your world on a custom map. Starting today, you can access My Maps right from Google Drive on your Google Apps account, so it’s even easier to create, find and share your custom maps.”

Farmers of Kenya Get New Seed Selection Tool

The country of Kenya has a new database to help farmers with seed selection. “Mbegu means seed in Kiswahili language. According to the developers, MbeguChoice, which is the first of its kind in Sub-Saharan Africa, allows Kenyan farmers, agro-dealers and extension workers to analyse information on counties, crops, seasons and crop attributes such as drought-tolerance, disease- and pest-resistance, resulting in a list of suitable seed varieties and where they can be obtained.”

USA.gov Ditches Its Blog for Social Media, E-Mail

Crap. USA.gov is no longer going to update its blog. To get updates, you either have to follow them on Facebook (getting updates from a liked Facebook page? Fat chance), Twitter (possible if you’ve got Nuzzel, otherwise you’re relying on timing and luck), or e-mail (here’s hoping USA.gov’s newsletter either dodges a spam filter or doesn’t end up in GMail’s “promotional” tab). With RSS feeds I knew I was going to get USA.gov’s updates. Now? Plllbbbt.