The Internet Archive Will Launch a 2016 Political Ad Tracker

The Internet Archive is going to have a 2016 political ad tracker. “We will be capturing all TV programming in select 2016 primary election locales, front-loaded to reflect early-state candidate winnowing. We hope to apply lessons learned during the primaries, to key general election battleground states in the fall. In addition to our regular TV news research library interface, we’ll be creating an online reference page for each unique-content political ad. These pages will present journalist fact-checking and other analysis. Accompanying these assessments will be information about ad sponsors, campaign financial transparency data as well as dynamically updated tracking on each ad’s plays, including frequency, locale, etc.”

Google+ Photos Shutting Down August 1

Google+ Photos is shutting down on August 1. I can’t say I’m sorry about this. Google+ Photos was a bit of a mess and I really missed Picasa. “The shutdown of Google+ Photos will start on August 1. According to Google, the Android version will go first; shortly thereafter, the web and iOS versions will go dark. Your photos hosted on Google+ will automatically migrate over to photos.google.com, their new home. Alternatively, you’ll also be able to grab all your photos via Google Takeout if you just want out all together.”

A Bunch of MongoDB Data Has Been Exposed Online

A bunch of MongoDB data has been exposed on the Internet. “A total of 595.2 terabytes (TB) of data is exposed on the internet via publicly accessible MongoDB instances that don’t require any form of authentication. That is the claim of blogger and Shodan developer John Matherly, following an investigation. Shodan is a search engine designed to expose online devices.”

Instagram Allowing Searching from Web

Instagram is now allowing more search functionality from the Web. “You can now look up anything from hashtags, locations and usernames right from the desktop. Tags and locations are getting their own pages too, so you can see the most popular related images.” I’ll work with it, but right now I really like Websta and Worldcam, though Worldcam has occasional API issues.

Now Available: A Map of Meerkat Streams

There is now a map of Meerkat streams. “The app, which is hosted on Github, takes advantage of Meerkat’s API, which the company released in May. It’s very similar to the Global List already available in Meerkat’s competitor, Periscope: it groups streams in aggregate, so you can see from a zoomed out view how many are streaming in that area. But Meerkat Map actually breaks down further when you zoom in, so you could narrow down to the city level where streams are coming from. Which is either neat or completely creepy, depending on how you look at it.”

Is Google Going to Start Selling Custom E-Mail Addresses?

A rumor is running around that Google is going to sell custom e-mail addresses for a monthly fee. “As you can see in the screenshot above, the prices start at $2 a month which will give users their own custom Gmail address, letting them choose “you@youraddress.com”, subject to availability of course. However for $2, that’s all you will be getting and you won’t be getting additional storage. However if you want added storage, you can pay $5 a month which is more or less the same feature, but with 30GB of email storage, online support, and access to business tools.”

New Business/Service Directory for Transgender People

A new online directory intends to aggregate business and service information for transgender people. “…a non-profit advocacy group in Chicago has created an online database to help transgender people find businesses and service providers that are not just friendly, but understanding of their needs. Most of the online directory is comprised of healthcare services, and it includes a rate and review function, as well as the ability to search for businesses and providers by location.The directory, called RAD Remedy — RAD stands for Referral Aggregator Database — is online, but still in development mode.”

Google Maps Now Has a Timeline

Google Maps now has a timeline. “Have you ever wanted a way to easily remember all the places you’ve been — whether it’s a museum you visited during your last vacation or that fun bar you stumbled upon a few months ago? Well, starting today, Google Maps can help. We’re gradually rolling out Your Timeline, a useful way to remember and view the places you’ve been on a given day, month or year. Your Timeline allows you to visualize your real-world routines, easily see the trips you’ve taken and get a glimpse of the places where you spend your time. And if you use Google Photos, we’ll show the photos you took when viewing a specific day, to help resurface your memories.”

World of Fine Wine Launches Digital Archive

The World of Fine Wine magazine has launched a digital archive. “The World of Fine Wine, and the publishers Progressive Media International, have worked with digital content specialists Exact Editions to digitise the archive, making the resource readily available to print and digital subscribers alike. The extensive archive makes for a valuable resource; available for universities, corporations and other organisations, who can take out a specialist network subscription utilising Exact Editions IP authentication technology, say the company.” It’s 48 issues over 11 years.

London Synagogue Seatholders Collection Goes Online

A collection of records for London synagogue seatholders (1920-1939) has gone online. “Revealing details of positions held by forebears, researchers will be able to track ancestors who became wardens, council members, or served on committees of their synagogue, as well as seatholders in synagogues from around the capital city. These fully indexed records allow family historians to search by name, keyword, synagogue and address and with one click see an image taken from the pages of Seatholders for Synagogues in London.”

Woman Joins Google Suit After Being Recruited and Rejected FOUR Times

A woman who was recruited by Google and rejected by Google four times has joined an age discrimination lawsuit. “According to the lawsuit, a Google recruiter contacted [Cheryl] Fillekes in 2007 for possible employment in either Google’s engineering and testing group or its software development group. There were a series of phone interviews and an in-person interview at Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, California. In 2010, a different Google recruiter contacted her and said that from her previous interview scores, she was an ideal candidate. This happened again in 2011 and late 2013. In each case, a Google recruiter contacted her and there were a series of phone interviews, concluding with in-person interviews, but no job offer.” Sue them for wasting your time!

Stanford: Google Glass and the Elderly

From Stanford: Google Glass and the Elderly. “Glass will probably find its largest and most loyal customer base in communities dealing with old age. After all, there is a very large population of aging Baby Boomers set on a collision course with all the ills and predicaments that come with age. As Google Glass evolves, evaluation of its adoption to elder care service is vital for further program design and development. This study uses examples and surveys to evaluate the variables influencing the use of technology service programs by the elderly. A questionnaire survey was used to explore the technology acceptance of the elderly in a Google Glass based program. In addition, open-ended questions were used to elicit qualitative information regarding the experience of technology use. The results revealed elderly with higher social welfare statuses, better health conditions, and more frequent tech usage are usually more open to the idea […]