Collection of French Globes to Be Digitized by Tokyo Company

A Tokyo company is going to digitize a collection of historic globes from France and put them online. “Dai Nippon Printing Co. will digitally copy 55 of the historic terrestrial and celestial globes in the National Library of France’s collection so that people can view them on screen. The globes were handcrafted in Europe and the Middle East from the 11th to the 19th centuries, are extremely valuable, and include a 15th-century copy of the world’s oldest terrestrial globe.”

IFTTT, Now With Pinterest Channel

Hey! IFTTT now has a Pinterest channel. Triggers are either liking a Pin or adding a Pin to your board; its action is adding a Pin to your board. Tons of interesting stuff here. I like tracking Pins on a Google Spreadsheet, or cataloging Pin information to a Dropbox text file.

Chromecast Gets A Wired Ethernet Adapter

What a great idea: Google is now offering a wired adapter for its Chromecast. The bad news: it’s already sold out. “The powered accessory plugs into the USB port on your Chromecast. From there, you just need to run an Ethernet cable from your router to the power supply. It’s that simple.”

WSJ Early Review on Project Fi: Meh

The Wall Street Journal has an early review of Google’s Project Fi. They seem pretty meh about it. “Dead simple to set up and use, its rates start at $30 a month. It could save you some money if you accept some big limitations. It only works with one phone, for starters. The Nexus 6, built by Motorola in collaboration with Google, is a speedy smartphone with a gorgeous display and the best, most unaltered version of Android you can find. But it has a middling camera and its 6-inch display makes it massive to hold. If Project Fi’s SIM cards worked in phones from Samsung, HTC—dare I say, Apple?—it’d be easier to recommend.”

Terrifying Research on False Popularity in Social Networks

Terrifying research from the University of Southern California. The article is called The Social-Network Illusion That Tricks Your Mind. It’s about how human and social networks can be mislead into thinking something is common and popular when it’s not. “That’s interesting work that immediately explains a number of interesting phenomena. For a start, it shows how some content can spread globally while other similar content does not—the key is to start with a small number of well-connected early adopters fooling the rest of the network into thinking it is common.” What’s so terrifying about that? The issue is that Facebook distributes posts among friends based at least partially on early reactions to it. They may be applying a skewed amount of weight – and giving an untoward amount of power – to a small subset of users. This research could explain why viewpoints that are truly minority, or overtly antisocial, […]

University of Kansas Study on How Latinos Use Social Media

More studies on the use of Twitter, this time from the University of Kansas. “A University of Kansas professor has co-authored research examining the reasons Latinos and whites use the social media platforms Facebook and Twitter, finding the former use them significantly more for advocacy and identity exploration than their counterparts. Mike Radlick, content creator at Come Recommended, a public relations firm in Maryland, and Joseph Erba, assistant professor of journalism at KU, surveyed 140 white and 115 Latino Facebook and Twitter users to determine why and how they use the platforms and the gratifications they take from them.”

Unsending E-Mail: An App Roundup

TIME with a roundup of apps that can help you unsend e-mail. These go way beyond GMail’s unsend but bear this in mind: you can never really be sure you’ve deleted an e-mail after someone’s read it. They can always take a screen shot, no matter how you’ve encrypted or turned the text into an image.

Font Access in Google Docs

Want to play with a bunch of in Google Docs? there’s an add-on for that. “Available as a free add-on via Google Docs, Extensis Fonts provides a panel where you can browse, preview and apply fonts directly from within Google documents.”

Digital Archive of Baltimore Protests Under Construction

Universities are teaming up to create a digital archive of the Baltimore protests. “To date more than 1,200 items have been donated to the archive including photographs, videos, and eyewitness oral histories. A website has been set up by Denise Meringolo, an associate professor of history at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County to display the historical archive.”

Live Streaming: Social Control from Afar

Interesting article from MIT Technology Review: Live Streaming: Social Control from Afar. “…there is something about the dynamics of a remote audience that seems to inspire otherwise reasonable people to cause trouble. This was one of the lessons we learned from an experiment we conducted at the MIT Media Lab in 2001. The setup was that an actor equipped with a camera mounted on her forehead and a backpack full of electronics would do whatever the audience (the “directors,” connected via the Internet) collectively decided she should do. Directors could suggest and vote on actions; every few minutes the highest-rated one would be sent to the actor to carry out. She ended up dancing on the table and eating from other people’s plates. Suggesting something transgressive was irresistible. “

Beautiful Archive of Leica Photography Magazines

Oooh, another fun find from Peta Pixel. This time it’s an archive of Leica photography magazines. There are 70 issues available and they date back to 1949. The site includes a 52-page PDF index of all uploaded issues which gives a detailed table of contents. Someone put a heck of a lot of work into this. Beautifully done. Pro tip, when you’re using the archive, click on a cover and then click horizontally to browse the issues available. Scroll vertically to browse the PDFs themselves.

Keyword Stuffing With PDF Documents

Sneaky black hat SEO: Using PDF documents to keyword stuff. “Always refining its search algorithms, Google is constantly on the lookout for new methods that attackers and unscrupulous search engine optimization (SEO) practitioners use to manipulate its system to gain higher search rankings. The practice of ‘cloaking’ to fool Google’s page indexer has been known for a while. It’s a method of serving the Googlebot with content stuffed with keywords to mislead it into thinking a site is relevant to trending search terms.” Apparently with Google focusing so much on HTML-type pages, bad guys are now looking at exploiting PDFs.

Washington Post Starts Encrypting Part of Its Site

The Washington Post has begun encrypting part of their Web site. “The Washington Post will begin encrypting parts of its Web site Tuesday, making it more difficult for hackers, government agencies and others to track the reading habits of people who visit the site. The added security will immediately apply to The Post’s homepage as well as stories on the site’s national security page and the technology policy blog The Switch. The encryption will roll out to the rest of the site over the coming months.”