University of Mississippi News: Professor Works to Make Theologian’s Historical Records Accessible

University of Mississippi News: Professor Works to Make Theologian’s Historical Records Accessible. “University of Mississippi historian Jeffrey R. Watt has been working for 35 years to transcribe records kept by 16th century theologian John Calvin concerning the Consistory of Geneva. And thanks to two major grants to fund the painstaking work, he is closing in on the project’s completion.”

University of South Florida: New “Lost Voices” exhibit translates and digitizes America’s oldest parish archive to provide rare insight into early Florida history

University of South Florida: New “Lost Voices” exhibit translates and digitizes America’s oldest parish archive to provide rare insight into early Florida history. “A new online exhibit launched today by the University of South Florida’s La Florida: The Interactive Digital Archives of the Americas will provide the public with unprecedented insight into the daily lives and relationships of the multi-ethnic population that comprised St. Augustine, Fla. from the 16th-19th centuries. The Florida city is the oldest continuously inhabited European settlement in the continental U.S.” This is part one of a two-part release. The second part will be released “later this year” according to the announcement.

Aleteia: The first book ever printed in Ukraine was this illustrated Acts of the Apostles and the Epistles

Aleteia: The first book ever printed in Ukraine was this illustrated Acts of the Apostles and the Epistles. “A priceless piece of Ukrainian Christian history, preserved for the better part of 500 years, is one of the latest exhibits to enter the world of digital art. Titled Apostol, or Apostolos, the work contains the texts of the Acts of the Apostles and the Epistles. It was digitized and placed online for the world to view thanks to the Bodleian Library…. According to Bodleian, this is the first book that was ever printed in L’viv, Ukraine, between 1564 and 1581.”

Daily Mail: Conservators find QUILL inside Queen Elizabeth I-era document

Daily Mail is not one of my usual sources, but I’ll make an exception. Daily Mail: Conservators find QUILL inside Queen Elizabeth I-era document. “A quill with ink still its nib has been found in between the pages of an official document dating from the rule of Queen Elizabeth I. The writing implement was discovered by conservators when they were carrying out repair work on the manuscript, a draft land lease agreement, at the National Archives’ headquarters in Kew, West London, yesterday.”

Global Times: Chinese museum launches digital protection for nearly 50 Ming Dynasty costume items

Global Times: Chinese museum launches digital protection for nearly 50 Ming Dynasty costume items . “Shan Dong Museum in East China’s Shandong Province launched digital protection for nearly 50 items of ancient costumes of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), filling the gap of digital collection of cultural relics. The museum’s staff will collect textures of costumes from hundreds of years ago and complete the work of modeling these costumes, according to a report by China News Service on Wednesday.”

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available. “The database covers a wide range of aspects of the Imjin War, such as information on prisoners, pottery produced during that period, Christianity, international relations, economics, the environment, Europe, identities, literature, military history, migrations, social history and trade. It allows analysing the human aspect of war, given that tens of thousands of Koreans were captured and sold to Japan as slaves, and many Japanese soldiers fell into the hands of the Chinese army and never returned to their country of origin. The project examines the trajectory of these people and how they were integrated into their new societies.”

From witchcraft to cheese theft: archive sheds light on 200 years of crime (The Guardian)

The Guardian: From witchcraft to cheese theft: archive sheds light on 200 years of crime. “From the tragic case of Cecilia Samuel, found guilty of drowning her newborn baby in a ditch in Wisbech, to William Sturns, accused of stealing three cheeses, 200 years of crimes in the diocese of Ely are being catalogued for the first time.” The archives are expected to be finished in September of next year.

Digital Library of Georgia: 16th-century liturgical codex now freely available in the Digital Library of Georgia

Digital Library of Georgia: 16th-century liturgical codex now freely available in the Digital Library of Georgia. “The book, or codex, is a leather and metal-bound liturgical volume of hand-lettered manuscript pages written in Latin and estimated to have been created around 1580. It contains text from the Catholic Tridentine Mass, adopted at the Council of Trent a decade earlier, and includes excerpts from the book of Matthew and musical notation for hymns.”

Asian and African Studies Blog: Jesuit Mission Press ‘Feiqe monogatari’ now online

Asian and African Studies Blog: Jesuit Mission Press ‘Feiqe monogatari’ now online. “One of the most important items in the British Library’s Japanese collections is a small, rather ordinary-looking, leather-bound volume, generally known as Feiqe monogatari (BL shelfmark Or.59.aa.1). Despite its appearance, it is, in fact, a remarkable work in a number of ways. Firstly, it was one of the earliest books printed in Japan using movable type rather than the traditional woodblocks, secondly, it is the first non-religious text printed in colloquial Japanese transcribed into the Roman alphabet, offering valuable insights into the phonology of the Japanese language in the 16th century, and thirdly, it is the world’s only extant copy.”

The Conversation: What Catholic Church records tell us about America’s earliest black history

The Conversation: What Catholic Church records tell us about America’s earliest black history. “In 1513, a free and literate African named Juan Garrido explored Florida with a Spanish conquistador, Juan Ponce de León. In the following decades, Africans, free and enslaved, were part of all the Spanish expeditions exploring the southern region of the United States. In 1565, Africans helped establish the first permanent European settlement in what is St. Augustine, Florida today. The Slave Societies Digital Archive which I direct as a historian at Vanderbilt University includes Catholic Church records from St. Augustine. These records date back to the 1590s and document some of the earliest black history of the U.S.”

RIT News: Student MSD team recreates 16th century reading wheel

RIT News: Student MSD team recreates 16th century reading wheel . “Matt Nygren is a fifth-year mechanical engineering student who recently finished a unique multidisciplinary senior design project. Nygren worked with three other fifth-year mechanical engineering students, Ian Kurtz ’18, Reese Salen ’18 and Maher Abdelkawi, to recreate a piece of 16th century technology: Ramelli’s Rotating Reader.”

The Getty Iris: Two Intricate Calligraphy Pages from the Sixteenth-Century Manuscript “Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta” Have Been Decoded for the First Time

The Getty Iris, with a side of “Oh, WOW” -: Two Intricate Calligraphy Pages from the Sixteenth-Century Manuscript “Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta” Have Been Decoded for the First Time. “One letter of a Latin text on a page of sixteenth-century parchment captivated my attention for three hours. I consulted dictionaries to determine potential Latin words that might shed light on the myriad possibilities for this letterform. I used magnifying glasses to zoom in on the letter to find any hidden clues; shapes that might lead me in a better direction. It took fully three hours for me to realize that this letter was an uppercase Z.” Visit the article if only to look at the images. The lettering is unreal.

YaleNews: Digital humanist Schuwey on rebooting a 400-year-old French Facebook

YaleNews: Digital humanist Schuwey on rebooting a 400-year-old French Facebook. “At Yale, in the newly reopened Digital Humanities Lab (DHLab), [Christophe] Schuwey will work on one of his latest projects, which involves digitizing the printed books of written portraits that circulated amongst French elites and high bourgeoisie in the 1600s — which, he said, functioned pretty much like Facebook does today. Schuwey will use 21st-century computing technology to relink these 17th-century social networks, giving modern scholars like himself new access to this lost ‘virtual world’ of fluctuating social hierarchy and markets of individual reputation in 1600s France.”