Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: First database on the Imjin War now available. “The database covers a wide range of aspects of the Imjin War, such as information on prisoners, pottery produced during that period, Christianity, international relations, economics, the environment, Europe, identities, literature, military history, migrations, social history and trade. It allows analysing the human aspect of war, given that tens of thousands of Koreans were captured and sold to Japan as slaves, and many Japanese soldiers fell into the hands of the Chinese army and never returned to their country of origin. The project examines the trajectory of these people and how they were integrated into their new societies.”

WUFT: Important Floridian Artifacts Collection Receives Almost $100,000 For Upgrades

WUFT: Important Floridian Artifacts Collection Receives Almost $100,000 For Upgrades. “The Florida Museum of Natural History has received almost $100,000 to upgrade over 20,000 artifacts from excavations of the Franciscan mission site of San Juan Del Puerto.”

The Scotsman: Map of Scots women accused of witchcraft published for first time

The Scotsman: Map of Scots women accused of witchcraft published for first time. “A map that tracks more than 3,000 Scots women who were accused of being witches in the 16th and 17th Century has been published for the first time. The interactive document has been created by data experts at the University of Edinburgh.”

From witchcraft to cheese theft: archive sheds light on 200 years of crime (The Guardian)

The Guardian: From witchcraft to cheese theft: archive sheds light on 200 years of crime. “From the tragic case of Cecilia Samuel, found guilty of drowning her newborn baby in a ditch in Wisbech, to William Sturns, accused of stealing three cheeses, 200 years of crimes in the diocese of Ely are being catalogued for the first time.” The archives are expected to be finished in September of next year.

Digital Library of Georgia: 16th-century liturgical codex now freely available in the Digital Library of Georgia

Digital Library of Georgia: 16th-century liturgical codex now freely available in the Digital Library of Georgia. “The book, or codex, is a leather and metal-bound liturgical volume of hand-lettered manuscript pages written in Latin and estimated to have been created around 1580. It contains text from the Catholic Tridentine Mass, adopted at the Council of Trent a decade earlier, and includes excerpts from the book of Matthew and musical notation for hymns.”

Asian and African Studies Blog: Jesuit Mission Press ‘Feiqe monogatari’ now online

Asian and African Studies Blog: Jesuit Mission Press ‘Feiqe monogatari’ now online. “One of the most important items in the British Library’s Japanese collections is a small, rather ordinary-looking, leather-bound volume, generally known as Feiqe monogatari (BL shelfmark Or.59.aa.1). Despite its appearance, it is, in fact, a remarkable work in a number of ways. Firstly, it was one of the earliest books printed in Japan using movable type rather than the traditional woodblocks, secondly, it is the first non-religious text printed in colloquial Japanese transcribed into the Roman alphabet, offering valuable insights into the phonology of the Japanese language in the 16th century, and thirdly, it is the world’s only extant copy.”

The Conversation: What Catholic Church records tell us about America’s earliest black history

The Conversation: What Catholic Church records tell us about America’s earliest black history. “In 1513, a free and literate African named Juan Garrido explored Florida with a Spanish conquistador, Juan Ponce de León. In the following decades, Africans, free and enslaved, were part of all the Spanish expeditions exploring the southern region of the United States. In 1565, Africans helped establish the first permanent European settlement in what is St. Augustine, Florida today. The Slave Societies Digital Archive which I direct as a historian at Vanderbilt University includes Catholic Church records from St. Augustine. These records date back to the 1590s and document some of the earliest black history of the U.S.”

RIT News: Student MSD team recreates 16th century reading wheel

RIT News: Student MSD team recreates 16th century reading wheel . “Matt Nygren is a fifth-year mechanical engineering student who recently finished a unique multidisciplinary senior design project. Nygren worked with three other fifth-year mechanical engineering students, Ian Kurtz ’18, Reese Salen ’18 and Maher Abdelkawi, to recreate a piece of 16th century technology: Ramelli’s Rotating Reader.”

The Getty Iris: Two Intricate Calligraphy Pages from the Sixteenth-Century Manuscript “Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta” Have Been Decoded for the First Time

The Getty Iris, with a side of “Oh, WOW” -: Two Intricate Calligraphy Pages from the Sixteenth-Century Manuscript “Mira Calligraphiae Monumenta” Have Been Decoded for the First Time. “One letter of a Latin text on a page of sixteenth-century parchment captivated my attention for three hours. I consulted dictionaries to determine potential Latin words that might shed light on the myriad possibilities for this letterform. I used magnifying glasses to zoom in on the letter to find any hidden clues; shapes that might lead me in a better direction. It took fully three hours for me to realize that this letter was an uppercase Z.” Visit the article if only to look at the images. The lettering is unreal.

YaleNews: Digital humanist Schuwey on rebooting a 400-year-old French Facebook

YaleNews: Digital humanist Schuwey on rebooting a 400-year-old French Facebook. “At Yale, in the newly reopened Digital Humanities Lab (DHLab), [Christophe] Schuwey will work on one of his latest projects, which involves digitizing the printed books of written portraits that circulated amongst French elites and high bourgeoisie in the 1600s — which, he said, functioned pretty much like Facebook does today. Schuwey will use 21st-century computing technology to relink these 17th-century social networks, giving modern scholars like himself new access to this lost ‘virtual world’ of fluctuating social hierarchy and markets of individual reputation in 1600s France.”

Hyperallergic: A New Illustrated Database for Women Artists Spans the 15th to 19th Centuries

Hyperallergic: A New Illustrated Database for Women Artists Spans the 15th to 19th Centuries. “‘A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction,’ Virginia Woolf famously said from a college lecture podium in 1928, in what later evolved into a major feminist book. Surely, those two amenities would facilitate the career of many a woman visual artist, too. But even the privileged combination of financial independence and a studio (plus talent, of course) hasn’t been enough to secure many female creatives a place in the pantheon of art history.”

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Acquires Extremely Rare Mesoamerican Codex

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Acquires Extremely Rare Mesoamerican Codex. “The Library of Congress has acquired the Codex Quetzalecatzin, one of the very few Mesoamerican manuscripts to survive from the 16th century. After being in private collections for more than 100 years, the codex has been digitally preserved and made available online for the first time to the general public…”

Pem nem: a 16th-century Urdu romance goes on-line (British Library)

British Library: Pem nem: a 16th-century Urdu romance goes on-line. “One of the treasures of the Urdu manuscript collection at the British Library has been digitised and made available online. The Pem Nem (Add.16880) is one of the finest examples of manuscript illustration from the court of Sultan Ibrahim Adil Shah II, who ruled the kingdom of Bijapur from 1580 to 1627. Containing 34 miniature paintings illustrating the Sufi love story of prince Shah Ji and princess Mah Ji, the manuscript was written by an author by the name of Hasan Manju Khalji, bearing the pen name of Hans.” Gorgeous!

The Newberry: Announcing “Religious Change, 1450 – 1700”

From The Newberry: Announcing “Religious Change, 1450 – 1700”. “The Newberry announces the public launch of Religious Change, 1450 – 1700, a multidisciplinary project drawing on the full range of the library’s programs, services, and staff expertise. Coinciding with the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s 95 Theses, Religious Change will explore how challenges to religious authority ushered in an age of hope, fear, and anxiety that continues to shape religion, politics, culture, and every other facet of human life. We will pursue this theme through an array of public programs and digital resources, as well as an exhibition opening in September. “

LA TImes: Shakespeare died 401 years ago, but original scripts from his era live on in a new digital archive

Los Angeles Times: Shakespeare died 401 years ago, but original scripts from his era live on in a new digital archive. “Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Middleton and Thomas Nashe — despite the best efforts of high school and college English teachers — remain also-rans compared with William Shakespeare, whose fame keeps growing…. On Sunday, the Folger Shakespeare Library — the august institution based in Washington, D.C., that includes a research institute as well as a celebrated theater — will try again to change this. Last year, on the widely celebrated 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, the library offered a digital archive of the playwright’s work. This year, on the 401st, the Folger will open a Digital Anthology of Early English Drama, which makes original scripts and visual images from 40 plays available to anyone with Internet access.” The site is live now.