WUFT: Important Floridian Artifacts Collection Receives Almost $100,000 For Upgrades

WUFT: Important Floridian Artifacts Collection Receives Almost $100,000 For Upgrades. “The Florida Museum of Natural History has received almost $100,000 to upgrade over 20,000 artifacts from excavations of the Franciscan mission site of San Juan Del Puerto.”

The Scotsman: Map of Scots women accused of witchcraft published for first time

The Scotsman: Map of Scots women accused of witchcraft published for first time. “A map that tracks more than 3,000 Scots women who were accused of being witches in the 16th and 17th Century has been published for the first time. The interactive document has been created by data experts at the University of Edinburgh.”

The Public’s Radio: Museum says not everything glittered in Dutch ‘Golden Age’

The Public’s Radio: Museum says not everything glittered in Dutch ‘Golden Age’. “Not everything glittered in the 17th century when what is now the Netherlands was a mercantile, military and artistic superpower, so a Dutch museum has decided to stop calling that era the ‘Golden Age.’ In a statement this week, Amsterdam Museum curator Tom van der Molen said the term is strongly linked to national pride over prosperity and peace but ‘ignores the many negative sides of the 17th century, such as poverty, war, forced labor and human trafficking.'”

From witchcraft to cheese theft: archive sheds light on 200 years of crime (The Guardian)

The Guardian: From witchcraft to cheese theft: archive sheds light on 200 years of crime. “From the tragic case of Cecilia Samuel, found guilty of drowning her newborn baby in a ditch in Wisbech, to William Sturns, accused of stealing three cheeses, 200 years of crimes in the diocese of Ely are being catalogued for the first time.” The archives are expected to be finished in September of next year.

CTV News Winnipeg: Province digitizing centuries-old trading post records to mark Manitoba 150

CTV News Winnipeg: Province digitizing centuries-old trading post records to mark Manitoba 150. “The province of Manitoba will celebrate its sesquicentennial in 2020 and plans to mark the anniversary are well underway. The Hudson’s Bay Company Archives (HBCA), which is part of the Archives of Manitoba, is getting help from The Hudson’s Bay Company History Foundation for a mass digitization project, one of the first Manitoba 150 projects. HBCA is digitizing over 1000 reels of microfilm copies of pre-1870 trading post records, making them available to the world online.”

The Guardian: British Library’s collection of obscene writing goes online

The Guardian: British Library’s collection of obscene writing goes online. “Together with an 18th-century directory of sex workers in the Covent Garden area of London, and the violent erotic works of the Marquis de Sade, the Merryland books are among the 2,500 volumes in the British Library’s Private Case collection. The volumes have now been digitised, and are being made available online by the publisher Gale as part of its Archives of Sexuality and Gender academic research resource.”

New York Academy of Medicine: Digitizing the William S. Ladd Collection of Prints

New York Academy of Medicine: Digitizing the William S. Ladd Collection of Prints. “We are excited to launch a new digital collection: the William S. Ladd Collection of Prints! In 1975, The New York Academy of Medicine accepted the gift of the William S. Ladd collection, which consisted of 671 prints dating from the 17th – 19th centuries, from Cornell University Medical College via Erich Meyerhoff, then Librarian of the Medical College Library. Since receiving the Ladd Collection, the Library rehoused and conserved the material.”

University of Birmingham: University of Birmingham Research sheds light on Early Stuart England pamphleteering

University of Birmingham: University of Birmingham Research sheds light on Early Stuart England pamphleteering. “Hundreds of handwritten pamphlets detailing the news, politics, intrigue and scandals of pre-Civil War Britain are now at academics, history buffs, teachers and students’ fingertips thanks to a project led by University of Birmingham historian Dr Noah Millstone.”

Hyperallergic: A New Illustrated Database for Women Artists Spans the 15th to 19th Centuries

Hyperallergic: A New Illustrated Database for Women Artists Spans the 15th to 19th Centuries. “‘A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction,’ Virginia Woolf famously said from a college lecture podium in 1928, in what later evolved into a major feminist book. Surely, those two amenities would facilitate the career of many a woman visual artist, too. But even the privileged combination of financial independence and a studio (plus talent, of course) hasn’t been enough to secure many female creatives a place in the pantheon of art history.”

The National Archives (UK): Prize Papers Project launches at Oldenburg Castle

The National Archives (UK): Prize Papers Project launches at Oldenburg Castle. “Imagine being the first person to open a letter written 250 years ago but which never reached its intended recipient. What might you find? What might you learn? This is the part of the daily work of the Prize Papers Project, exploring around 160,000 undelivered letters seized in their mail-bags from ships captured by the British in the wars of the 17th to the 19th centuries. Some of these letters are still unopened.”

New Digital Collection: Secretary of State Wills (State Archives of North Carolina)

State Archives of North Carolina: New Digital Collection: Secretary of State Wills. “The State Archives of North Carolina would like to announce the creation of the new digital collection, North Carolina Secretary of State Wills. The digital collection contains wills from 1663 to 1789. These are loose original wills probated in the province. After 1760 most original wills were kept by the clerk in the county in which they were probated, though there are some wills after 1760 in the collection.”

The Royal Society: Our new archive is live and free to use

The Royal Society: Our new archive is live and free to use. “Like most publishers, our content didn’t publish online first until 1997, so we have been busy updating the earlier content to make it easier to search, find and explore. In previous blog posts about the project the team have talked about the digitisation process, how we have made decisions about metadata, and the importance of language. For us this has been a massive undertaking as our content dates back to 1665!” This massive new collection is free to use until January 24th. So get some use out of your holiday break. Right?

Harvard: Scroll through Colonial life

Harvard: Scroll through Colonial life. “n a few weeks, the Harvard Library will release a new website for its ongoing, multiyear digitization ‘Colonial North American Project at Harvard University.’ Approximately 450,000 digitized pages of all the known archival and manuscript materials in the Library relating to 17th- and 18th-century North America will be available to the public.”

State Archives of NC Starts Blog Series on Interpreting Colonial-Era Handwriting

History for All the People, from the State Archives of North Carolina, is doing a series on how to interpret handwriting. “Since beginning my work with digitizing the General Assembly Session Records collection at the State Archives, I have had to do a bit of research on how to effectively interpret 18th century manuscripts in order create the appropriate metadata for the records and improve discoverability of these records in our digital collection. The following sections include a brief history of writing during this time period, characteristics of 17th and 18th century British-American handwriting, and some tips on deciphering the text found within these records. This is the first blog post of a series on how to read handwritten colonial documents.”