Digital Library of Georgia: Confederate naval ledger now freely available online

Digital Library of Georgia: Confederate naval ledger now freely available online. “The Confederate States Naval Iron Works operated from 1862-1865. The ledger also includes entries as late as 1866 as Warner worked with the United States Navy in turning over naval equipment to the United States government. Records surviving the Civil War that document the Confederate Navy is limited. This ledger provides information about Columbus, Georgia, ironclad construction, steam engines, and the daily operation and industrial reach of the Confederate States Naval Iron Works.”

Rediscovering Indian thought: How a scholar built a database of pre-Independence magazines (Scroll)

Scroll: Rediscovering Indian thought: How a scholar built a database of pre-Independence magazines. “The database indexes 315,000 entries from 255 English-language periodicals that were published between 1837 and 1947. It is, and will always be, a free resource. The database would not exist were it not for the immense hard work by a core group of research assistants – Meghna Basu, Christian Fastenrath, and Nidhi Shukla – and the help of hundreds of students and libraries around the world, and more than $350,000 in grants.” I loved this article until I started thinking about all the other endangered archives in the world and how much irreplaceable history may have been sold as waste paper.

Independent (Ireland): New website gives glimpse of the tenantry of Coolattin Estate

Independent (Ireland): New website gives glimpse of the tenantry of Coolattin Estate. “A fascinating new historical resource was launched at the Courthouse Arts Centre recently which offers a detailed glimpse into the life of tenants on the Earl of Fitzwilliam’s Wicklow estates between 1841 and 1868.”

Times Colonist: History available at your fingertips in online archive

Times Colonist: History available at your fingertips in online archive. “Back issues of the Colonist are more accessible than ever before, thanks to a digitization project led by the University of Victoria. Back issues from 1858 to 1970 are online… and the 1970s will be added early in 2019. As John Lutz, a history professor at the University of Victoria, has said, the website is a game-changer in historical research in B.C.”

US Department of State: Office of the Historian, Bureau of Public Affairs Releases Fourteen Newly Digitized Foreign Relations of the United States Volumes

US Department of State: Office of the Historian, Bureau of Public Affairs Releases Fourteen Newly Digitized Foreign Relations of the United States Volumes . “The Department of State today announces the release of newly digitized versions of fourteen volumes from the Foreign Relations of the United States series, the official documentary record of U.S. foreign relations. These volumes cover events that took place between 1861 and 1866 and were originally published in print between 1861 and 1867.”

Fold3: Free Access to Fold3’s Civil War Collection, April 1–15

Fold3: Free Access to Fold3’s Civil War Collection, April 1–15. “To commemorate the beginning of the Civil War in 1861, Fold3 is providing free access (with registration) to our Civil War Collection from April 1–15. This collection currently has 50 titles, with more than 91 million records, so if you’re looking for information on the Civil War veterans in your family tree—or doing other Civil War-era research—now is the perfect time to explore these records on Fold3.”

University of Washington: Civil War-era U.S. Navy ships’ logs to be explored for climate data, maritime history

University of Washington: Civil War-era U.S. Navy ships’ logs to be explored for climate data, maritime history. “The new $482,018 grant to the UW, the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration and the National Archives Foundation will support ‘Seas of Knowledge: Digitization and Retrospective Analysis of the Historical Logbooks of the United States Navy.’ This will allow the project to digitize the logbooks, muster rolls and related materials from U.S. naval vessels, focusing on the period from 1861 to 1879.”