The Royal Society: Our new archive is live and free to use

The Royal Society: Our new archive is live and free to use. “Like most publishers, our content didn’t publish online first until 1997, so we have been busy updating the earlier content to make it easier to search, find and explore. In previous blog posts about the project the team have talked about the digitisation process, how we have made decisions about metadata, and the importance of language. For us this has been a massive undertaking as our content dates back to 1665!” This massive new collection is free to use until January 24th. So get some use out of your holiday break. Right?

University of Virginia: Law Library Uncovers Hidden Legal Histories with Scottish Court of Session Digital Archive

University of Virginia: Law Library Uncovers Hidden Legal Histories with Scottish Court of Session Digital Archive. “Thirty years after the University of Virginia School of Law acquired a trove of legal documents from Scotland’s Court of Session, the supreme legal court there, the Law School’s Arthur J. Morris Law Library is building a digital archive and reaching out to partners ‘across the pond’ to open these legal history materials to scholars and the public. When complete, the archive will provide users with access to the previously hidden histories of people living through an era of profound change.”

Delaware: New Web Portal, Special Programming Commemorate 250th Anniversary of John Dickinson’s Revolutionary “Letters”

State of Delaware: New Web Portal, Special Programming Commemorate 250th Anniversary of John Dickinson’s Revolutionary “Letters”. “n the autumn of 1767, the American Colonies were reeling from a fresh round of taxation without representation handed down by Parliament in London. With their pleas for fair treatment and equal standing ignored by the Crown, the leading men of the fledgling colonial opposition began to turn their thoughts to more direct acts of resistance. But before the Boston Tea Party, before the First Continental Congress, and well before July 4, 1776, the Colonies needed a message to bring them together – a clear text that would lay out their common cause and draw them even closer in unity.”

Harvard: Scroll through Colonial life

Harvard: Scroll through Colonial life. “n a few weeks, the Harvard Library will release a new website for its ongoing, multiyear digitization ‘Colonial North American Project at Harvard University.’ Approximately 450,000 digitized pages of all the known archival and manuscript materials in the Library relating to 17th- and 18th-century North America will be available to the public.”

Georgia Archives Launches New “Colonial Conveyances” Online Collection

New from the Georgia Archives: Colonial Conveyances. From this page: “The Colonial Conveyances are the equivalent of property deeds. They are the recorded property transactions between private citizens in the Colony of Georgia. Colonists who received land grants from the Trustees or the Crown could sell or otherwise convey their land or other property to other private citizens. The conveyances consist primarily of property transfers, usually land purchases. Related documents, such as schedules of personal property and marriage agreements, may be recorded along with the conveyance. … The first volume, 1750 – 1761, contains conveyances and other documents recorded during the period when the colony was governed by the Trustees for Establishing the Colony of Georgia, 1732 – 1752. The State of Georgia did not pass a law requiring that deeds be recorded in the county where the property was located until 1785. Deed books for Georgia’s early counties do not begin until 1785-1786, with the exceptions of Liberty and Glynn Counties. Look for Georgia deeds from 1776 to 1785 in Colonial Conveyances.”

Revealed: how YOUR ancestors could have been convicts transported to Australia (The Echo)

The Echo: Revealed: how YOUR ancestors could have been convicts transported to Australia. “A new website will allow genealogists and family historians to discover the fate of ancestors convicted of crimes and transported overseas. The free-to-use website draws on over 4m court records and uncovers how punishment affected the lives of tens of thousands of people convicted of crimes at the Old Bailey between 1780 and 1925. The project to create the website was led by academics at The University of Liverpool. The records reveal a vast amount of information, such as the names, year and place of birth, previous offences, height, eye colour and whether the convict could read or write.”

Telangana Today: Nizam-era archives to go online

Telangana Today: Nizam-era archives to go online. “A dream repository of archival material comprising 50 million odd historical documents and spanning centuries is all set to be available at the click of a mouse. The Telangana State Archives and Research Institute has come up with a proposal for a digital library placing online all its documents that include ‘farmans’ and gazettes issued by erstwhile rulers and also a rich collection of manuscripts. The proposal has already been submitted to the State government for approval.”