New Digital Collection: Secretary of State Wills (State Archives of North Carolina)

State Archives of North Carolina: New Digital Collection: Secretary of State Wills. “The State Archives of North Carolina would like to announce the creation of the new digital collection, North Carolina Secretary of State Wills. The digital collection contains wills from 1663 to 1789. These are loose original wills probated in the province. After 1760 most original wills were kept by the clerk in the county in which they were probated, though there are some wills after 1760 in the collection.”

BL Labs 2017 Symposium: Data Mining Verse in 18th Century Newspapers by Jennifer Batt (British Library)

British Library: BL Labs 2017 Symposium: Data Mining Verse in 18th Century Newspapers by Jennifer Batt. “Dr Jennifer Batt, Senior Lecturer at the University of Bristol, reported on an investigation in finding verse using text and data-mining methods in a collection of digitised eighteenth-century newspapers in the British Library’s Burney Collection to recover a complex, expansive, ephemeral poetic culture that has been lost to us for well over 250 years.” A ~23 minute video of her presentation and her slide deck is available at the URL I linked to.

NBC29: Monticello Archaeologists Awarded $325,000 Grant to Expand Digital Archive

NBC 29: Monticello Archaeologists Awarded $325,000 Grant to Expand Digital Archive. “Archaeologists at Monticello have been awarded a grant that will help them as they continue to dig and learn about the history of Thomas Jefferson and his estate. The grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities is called ‘expanding the digital archaeological archive of comparative slavery research consortium.’ It sounds like a lot but what that means is the grant is going towards Monticello’s massive digital archive. The $325,000 grant will help grow the amount of researchers that are internationally working with Monticello.”

The Royal Society: Our new archive is live and free to use

The Royal Society: Our new archive is live and free to use. “Like most publishers, our content didn’t publish online first until 1997, so we have been busy updating the earlier content to make it easier to search, find and explore. In previous blog posts about the project the team have talked about the digitisation process, how we have made decisions about metadata, and the importance of language. For us this has been a massive undertaking as our content dates back to 1665!” This massive new collection is free to use until January 24th. So get some use out of your holiday break. Right?

University of Virginia: Law Library Uncovers Hidden Legal Histories with Scottish Court of Session Digital Archive

University of Virginia: Law Library Uncovers Hidden Legal Histories with Scottish Court of Session Digital Archive. “Thirty years after the University of Virginia School of Law acquired a trove of legal documents from Scotland’s Court of Session, the supreme legal court there, the Law School’s Arthur J. Morris Law Library is building a digital archive and reaching out to partners ‘across the pond’ to open these legal history materials to scholars and the public. When complete, the archive will provide users with access to the previously hidden histories of people living through an era of profound change.”

Delaware: New Web Portal, Special Programming Commemorate 250th Anniversary of John Dickinson’s Revolutionary “Letters”

State of Delaware: New Web Portal, Special Programming Commemorate 250th Anniversary of John Dickinson’s Revolutionary “Letters”. “n the autumn of 1767, the American Colonies were reeling from a fresh round of taxation without representation handed down by Parliament in London. With their pleas for fair treatment and equal standing ignored by the Crown, the leading men of the fledgling colonial opposition began to turn their thoughts to more direct acts of resistance. But before the Boston Tea Party, before the First Continental Congress, and well before July 4, 1776, the Colonies needed a message to bring them together – a clear text that would lay out their common cause and draw them even closer in unity.”

Harvard: Scroll through Colonial life

Harvard: Scroll through Colonial life. “n a few weeks, the Harvard Library will release a new website for its ongoing, multiyear digitization ‘Colonial North American Project at Harvard University.’ Approximately 450,000 digitized pages of all the known archival and manuscript materials in the Library relating to 17th- and 18th-century North America will be available to the public.”