Telangana Today: Nizam-era archives to go online

Telangana Today: Nizam-era archives to go online. “A dream repository of archival material comprising 50 million odd historical documents and spanning centuries is all set to be available at the click of a mouse. The Telangana State Archives and Research Institute has come up with a proposal for a digital library placing online all its documents that include ‘farmans’ and gazettes issued by erstwhile rulers and also a rich collection of manuscripts. The proposal has already been submitted to the State government for approval.”

State Archives of NC Starts Blog Series on Interpreting Colonial-Era Handwriting

History for All the People, from the State Archives of North Carolina, is doing a series on how to interpret handwriting. “Since beginning my work with digitizing the General Assembly Session Records collection at the State Archives, I have had to do a bit of research on how to effectively interpret 18th century manuscripts in order create the appropriate metadata for the records and improve discoverability of these records in our digital collection. The following sections include a brief history of writing during this time period, characteristics of 17th and 18th century British-American handwriting, and some tips on deciphering the text found within these records. This is the first blog post of a series on how to read handwritten colonial documents.”

China Daily: Archive to shed light on Briton’s Chinese adventure

China Daily: Archive to shed light on Briton’s Chinese adventure. “A collection of more than 400 letters and documents written two centuries ago will be digitized and made available to the public by the end of the year, something that is likely to shed light on Britain’s intellectual engagement with China in the 19th century. The papers, produced by Thomas Manning, who lived from 1772 to 1840 and who was one of Britain’s first scholars of Chinese language and culture, will be made available by the London-based Royal Asiatic Society.”

DAR: Searching the Museum Collection Database Online

From the Daughters of the American Revolution, with a big hat to to Melissa B: Searching the Museum Collection Database Online . “The DAR Museum has been working on a project to enable the public to use the DAR website to find information about objects in the DAR Museum collection. This is a big task since the museum collection contains over 30,000 objects. We use a database to keep track of all the information that we know about the paintings, furniture, clothing, textiles and items made of ceramics, glass and silver that are in the collection. In the database there are fields for an object’s name, materials, place made, donor, maker, size, storage or display location and any history that we know about the object. Now everyone is able to search this database from their own computer!”

New Digital Collection: The General Assembly Session Records (State Archives of North Carolina)

State Archives of North Carolina: New Digital Collection: The General Assembly Session Records. “The General Assembly Session Records collection is now available online via the North Carolina Digital Collections. This collection features records of early North Carolina state legislatures from the State Archives of North Carolina…. The physical collection includes items from 1709 through 1999, but the digital collection will focus on the earliest materials. This digital collection is currently in progress, and more items will be added as they are digitized. Check back for future updates on the status of this project.”

Digitizing the Royal Archives: The Georgian Papers Programme (AHA Today)

AHA Today: Digitizing the Royal Archives: The Georgian Papers Programme. “The goal of the Georgian Papers Programme, established by the Royal Archives in 2015 in partnership with King’s College London, is to make the approximately 350,000 materials in the Royal Archives and the Royal Library from the Georgian period (1714–1837) fully available online for scholars and the general public.”

Euromaidan Press: Huge genealogical database of Ukrainians born in 1650–1920 opens online

Euromaidan Press: Huge genealogical database of Ukrainians born in 1650–1920 opens online. “The database includes 2.56 mn people and is expected to reach 4 to 5 mn in 2019. The access to its contents is and will remain free of charge. The sources of data are manifold: birth registers, fiscal and parish censuses, lists of nobility, voters, the military, and victims of repressions, address directories, and other documents produced under the Tsardom of Muscovy, Russian and Habsburg Empires, Poland and the Soviet Union. A Roman-letter version of the data index is reportedly to be enabled in the coming months.” The home page was in Ukrainian, but Google Translate handled it okay.