Boing Boing: This cool online radio station lets you listen to popular songs from any decade and country from 1900 to now

Boing Boing: This cool online radio station lets you listen to popular songs from any decade and country from 1900 to now. “When you go to Radiooooo you see a map of the world. You click on any country on the map, and select a decade beginning with 1900. It will start playing music from that country and decade.” I tried United States / 1940s and the site started playing a lovely little groove called “Hot Dog” by Chris Powell & The Five Blue Flames.

American Federation of Labor: History Now Digital (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: American Federation of Labor: History Now Digital. “Americans in the late 19th and early 20th centuries witnessed the growth of two transformative but intertwined forces: massive waves of immigration from 1880 to 1920 and the roiling discontent of labor. Few organizations struggled to balance these developments more than the American Federation of Labor, one of the nation’s premier labor organizations.”

Rediscovering Indian thought: How a scholar built a database of pre-Independence magazines (Scroll)

Scroll: Rediscovering Indian thought: How a scholar built a database of pre-Independence magazines. “The database indexes 315,000 entries from 255 English-language periodicals that were published between 1837 and 1947. It is, and will always be, a free resource. The database would not exist were it not for the immense hard work by a core group of research assistants – Meghna Basu, Christian Fastenrath, and Nidhi Shukla – and the help of hundreds of students and libraries around the world, and more than $350,000 in grants.” I loved this article until I started thinking about all the other endangered archives in the world and how much irreplaceable history may have been sold as waste paper.

‘An invaluable resource’ for provenance research: German pre-1945 auction catalogues are published online (The Art Newspaper)

The Art Newspaper: ‘An invaluable resource’ for provenance research: German pre-1945 auction catalogues are published online. “Around 9,000 catalogues from more than 390 auction houses in Germany, Austria and Switzerland dating from 1901 to 1945 are now available online, a new resource that art-market historians and provenance researchers seeking to trace and identify Nazi-looted art say is invaluable to their work.”

The Getty Iris: Half a Million Records on Early 20th-Century German Art Market Added to Getty Provenance Index

The Getty Iris: Half a Million Records on Early 20th-Century German Art Market Added to Getty Provenance Index. “After four years of work, the Getty Provenance Index® has greatly expanded its database of German art sales catalogs, adding nearly 570,000 records of artwork sales for the years 1900 to 1929. This expansion, adding to existing records for the years 1930 to 1945, gives researchers in provenance and the art market unprecedented information on auction sales in Germany and Austria during the volatile years of the early twentieth century, including the periods of World War I, the Weimar Republic, and the years of politically sanctioned Nazi looting prior to and during World War II.”

University of Arkansas: Libraries Digitize First Issues of Arkansas Traveler Student Newspaper

University of Arkansas: Libraries Digitize First Issues of Arkansas Traveler Student Newspaper. “The University Libraries have digitized the first issues of the Arkansas Traveler student newspaper from 1907 to 1947. The first phase of the digital project is composed of 1,042 issues or roughly 4,780 single scans.”

Boston Public Library’s 78rpm Records Come to the Internet: Reformatting the Boston Public Library Sound Archives (Internet Archive)

Internet Archive: Boston Public Library’s 78rpm Records Come to the Internet: Reformatting the Boston Public Library Sound Archives. “Following eighteen months of work, more than 50,000 78rpm record ‘sides’ from the Boston Public Library’s sound archives have now been digitized and made freely available online by the Internet Archive.” I listened to a Cab Calloway song from 1946 (“Hey Now, Hey Now” if you care) and while it did have pops and crackles I was surprised at how good the sound quality was.