Digital Library of Georgia: Juliette Gordon Low travel journal available online

Digital Library of Georgia: Juliette Gordon Low travel journal available online. “The Digital Library of Georgia (DLG) is pleased to announce the availability of Juliette Gordon Low’s 1908 India travel correspondence… The collection, Juliette Gordon Low Correspondence, Series India Letters, belongs to Girl Scouts of the USA and is housed at the Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace.”

British Library: Percy Grainger’s collection of ethnographic wax cylinders

This is from February but I missed it. From the British Library: Percy Grainger’s collection of ethnographic wax cylinders. “The British Library is pleased to make available online around 350 English folk songs recorded by composer Percy Grainger in different regions of England between 1906 and 1909. Thanks to the generous support of the National Folk Music Fund, these sound recordings have been catalogued and indexed by librarian, researcher and folklorist Steve Roud, author of Folk Song in England (Faber & Faber, 2017). Roud has also married them up with Grainger’s transcriptions of the songs, where these exist, on the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library website, thanks to their digitisation of the Percy Grainger Manuscript Collection.”

Rutgers: Historical NJ Newspapers Now Available in Digital Format through Library of Congress National Digital Newspaper Program

Rutgers University Libraries: Historical NJ Newspapers Now Available in Digital Format through Library of Congress National Digital Newspaper Program. “The New Jersey Digital Newspaper Project is pleased to announce that the Perth Amboy Evening News, from 1903 to 1922, will be the first New Jersey newspaper to be digitized and made publically available through the Library of Congress Chronicling America website. “

The Tribune: From 1905-1938, they traveled California with a camera. Now, their photos are online

The Tribune: From 1905-1938, they traveled California with a camera. Now, their photos are online . “A new collection of California State Archives photos offer a peek into the Central Coast’s past, including images of long-gone North County landmarks. The archives digitized nearly 3,000 photos of early 20th century California taken by William and Grace McCarthy, who traveled throughout the state when automobiles were a new form of transportation.”

NCSU: Interactive Tool Offers Window Into History of Arab-Americans in NYC

North Carolina State University: Interactive Tool Offers Window Into History of Arab-Americans in NYC. “NC State researchers are unveiling an interactive site that allows scholars and the public to better understand the long history of Syrian and Lebanese immigrants to the United States. Focused on New York City in the early 20th century, the tool highlights the growth of Arab-American communities in the city and their integration into American life. The project, Syrians in New York: Mapping Movement, 1900-1930, was developed by the Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies as part of the center’s ongoing efforts to conduct digital mapping and analysis of Arab-American immigrants.”

State Library of New South Wales Australia: The Lone Hand

State Library of New South Wales Australia: The Lone Hand. “The Lone Hand (1907-1921), a sister publication to the famous Bulletin (1880-2008), has been digitised and made available through Trove. Modelled on the London Strand and founded by J.F. Archibald and Frank Fox, The Lone Hand was given the title originally preferred for the Bulletin itself. It was a monthly magazine of literature and poetry, with illustrations by significant Australian artists of the time. It was edited by Frank Fox (1907-09), A.H. Adams (1909-11), Bertram Stevens (1912-19) and Walter Jago (1919-21). Though Archibald set the magazine up, he never took a substantial editorial role.”

Australian Photo Review: Now Online (State Library of New South Wales)

State Library of New South Wales: Australian Photo Review: Now Online. ” This first issue appeared on 23 January 1897. Published by Baker and Rouse it was sold at ‘four shillings’ for a year’s subscription and it welcomed, … photographs and literary contributions or correspondence on all matters of interest to photographers. This new format obviously found its audience and the Australian Photographic Review, or A.P.R. as it later branded itself, was published monthly for the next 59 years. The longevity of this journal marks it as the most significant in terms of insights into the development of photography in Australia 1894 through to the last issue which appeared in December 1956.”