Smithsonian: Smithsonian American Art Museum Acquires Extraordinary Early Photography Collection From Larry J. West

Smithsonian: Smithsonian American Art Museum Acquires Extraordinary Early Photography Collection From Larry J. West. “The L.J. West Collection includes 286 objects from the 1840s to about 1925 in three groupings: works by early African American daguerreotypists James P. Ball, Glenalvin Goodridge and Augustus Washington; early photographs of diverse portrait subjects and objects related to abolitionists, the Underground Railroad and the role of women entrepreneurs in it; and photographic jewelry that represents the bridge between miniature painting and early cased photography such as daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes.”

Digital Library of Georgia: How I Identified The Earliest Surviving Film Footage of African American Baseball Players

Digital Library of Georgia: How I Identified The Earliest Surviving Film Footage of African American Baseball Players. “In 2011, we received a donation of films from Pebble Hill Plantation in Thomasville, Georgia, spanning from 1916 into the 1970s. Pebble Hill was the winter hunting retreat for the Hanna family of Cleveland, Ohio, prominent industrialists and politicians. One of the most important segments of all the films in the collection was 26 seconds of 28mm film showing Pebble Hill’s black baseball team playing Chinquapin Plantation’s black baseball team sometime in the 1910s or 1920s.”

Vail Daily: History Colorado to award locals for work in preserving Alfred Borah photos and journals from 1882 to 1917

Vail Daily: History Colorado to award locals for work in preserving Alfred Borah photos and journals from 1882 to 1917. “The journals of Brush Creek settler Alfred Borah, brother of famed Theodore Roosevelt hunting guide Jake Borah, are now searchable and available to the public thanks to a project from the Eagle County Historical Society and the Eagle Valley Library District.”

New Photos: Buffalo Soldiers at West Point (National Archives News)

National Archives News: New Photos: Buffalo Soldiers at West Point. “Photographs of Buffalo Soldiers serving at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, NY, during the early 20th century recently came to light at the National Archives. The images were discovered by a preservationist who was digitizing thousands of nitrate negatives transferred from the Academy to the Still Picture Branch of the National Archives at College Park, MD. Recognized for their expertise in riding, African American cavalry noncommissioned officers of the 9th and 10th Cavalry Regiments were stationed at West Point to serve in the Academy’s Detachment of Cavalry and teach Academy cadets military horsemanship.”

The Northern Echo: Finding love beneath the waterworks tree

The Northern Echo: Finding love beneath the waterworks tree. “Whereas Vincent lived in the west end of town, and his father, William, became the town’s mayor in 1931, Alice lived in a terrace on Corporation Road and worked in an insurance office. These very different ends of town were united by the Greenbank Methodist Church, where both their families worshipped and where their eyes first met. The website also features Alice’s diary, so we can see the relationship developing from both sides.”

Northeastern University: Archive of Sephardi music is released online, with help from a Northeastern administrator

Northeastern University: Archive of Sephardi music is released online, with help from a Northeastern administrator. “Joel Bresler’s collaborative work with the Jewish Music Research Centre at Hebrew U is now available for streaming. The Centre has e-released ‘Eastern Mediterranean Judeo-Spanish Songs from the EMI Archive Trust (1907-1912)’ … along with an accompanying booklet representing years of scholarship about the music.

BBC: Bradford Christopher Pratt photos show ‘side of life that disappeared’

BBC: Bradford Christopher Pratt photos show ‘side of life that disappeared’. “A Bradford boy’s pictures depicting ‘a side of life that has disappeared’ from the city have gone online. The exhibition, called Lad Wi’ Camera, shows the early photographs of Christopher Pratt, who was born in the city in 1888. He started to take pictures in about 1900 when he would have been aged 12.” Surprisingly good photography, especially for a early 20th century kid.

New Online: Digital Edition of the William Howard Taft Papers (HistoryHUB)

HistoryHUB: New Online: Digital Edition of the William Howard Taft Papers. “The papers of William Howard Taft (1857-1930), twenty-seventh president of the United States and tenth chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, consist of approximately 676,000 documents (785,977 images), which have been digitized from 658 reels of previously reproduced microfilm. Held in the Library of Congress Manuscript Division, these papers constitute the largest collection of original Taft documents in the world. The collection contains family papers, personal and official correspondence, presidential and judicial files, speeches and addresses, legal files and notebooks, business and estate papers, engagement calendars, guest lists, scrapbooks, clippings, printed matter, memorabilia, and photographs dating from 1784 to 1973, with the bulk of the material dated 1880-1930.”

The National: 13 insightful photos of early 1900s Palestine taken by engineer Nasri Fuleihan

The National: 13 insightful photos of early 1900s Palestine taken by engineer Nasri Fuleihan. “The Nasri Fuleihan Collection comprises more than 350 photographs by Nasri Fuleihan, who worked as an engineer in Palestine and helped exploring for oil in the Middle East. His photographs, taken between 1912 and 1924, can be viewed online thanks to Akkasah, NYU Abu Dhabi’s (NYUAD) Centre for Photography, which digitises photos from the region that documents day-to-day life. The collections are shared on the centre’s website for the public to browse and for researchers to use as resources.”

The California Aggie: The California Aggie first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize entire collection

The California Aggie: The California Aggie first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize entire collection. “The California Aggie, formerly known as The Weekly Agricola, is the first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize its entire historical collection. The California Digital Newspaper Collection (CDNC) — the online home of many historical editions of California-based periodicals — now showcases 5,410 issues of The Aggie. These issues date all the way back to the first issue of The Weekly Agricola on Sept. 29, 1915. The collection is broken down by year and month, has a keyword-search function and is available for download.” The Aggie is the newspaper of the University of California, Davis.

Boing Boing: This cool online radio station lets you listen to popular songs from any decade and country from 1900 to now

Boing Boing: This cool online radio station lets you listen to popular songs from any decade and country from 1900 to now. “When you go to Radiooooo you see a map of the world. You click on any country on the map, and select a decade beginning with 1900. It will start playing music from that country and decade.” I tried United States / 1940s and the site started playing a lovely little groove called “Hot Dog” by Chris Powell & The Five Blue Flames.

American Federation of Labor: History Now Digital (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: American Federation of Labor: History Now Digital. “Americans in the late 19th and early 20th centuries witnessed the growth of two transformative but intertwined forces: massive waves of immigration from 1880 to 1920 and the roiling discontent of labor. Few organizations struggled to balance these developments more than the American Federation of Labor, one of the nation’s premier labor organizations.”

Rediscovering Indian thought: How a scholar built a database of pre-Independence magazines (Scroll)

Scroll: Rediscovering Indian thought: How a scholar built a database of pre-Independence magazines. “The database indexes 315,000 entries from 255 English-language periodicals that were published between 1837 and 1947. It is, and will always be, a free resource. The database would not exist were it not for the immense hard work by a core group of research assistants – Meghna Basu, Christian Fastenrath, and Nidhi Shukla – and the help of hundreds of students and libraries around the world, and more than $350,000 in grants.” I loved this article until I started thinking about all the other endangered archives in the world and how much irreplaceable history may have been sold as waste paper.