The California Aggie: The California Aggie first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize entire collection

The California Aggie: The California Aggie first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize entire collection. “The California Aggie, formerly known as The Weekly Agricola, is the first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize its entire historical collection. The California Digital Newspaper Collection (CDNC) — the online home of many historical editions of California-based periodicals — now showcases 5,410 issues of The Aggie. These issues date all the way back to the first issue of The Weekly Agricola on Sept. 29, 1915. The collection is broken down by year and month, has a keyword-search function and is available for download.” The Aggie is the newspaper of the University of California, Davis.

Boing Boing: This cool online radio station lets you listen to popular songs from any decade and country from 1900 to now

Boing Boing: This cool online radio station lets you listen to popular songs from any decade and country from 1900 to now. “When you go to Radiooooo you see a map of the world. You click on any country on the map, and select a decade beginning with 1900. It will start playing music from that country and decade.” I tried United States / 1940s and the site started playing a lovely little groove called “Hot Dog” by Chris Powell & The Five Blue Flames.

Digital Library of Georgia: Sanborn fire insurance maps for select Georgia towns and cities dating from 1923-1941 now available for free online

Digital Library of Georgia: Sanborn fire insurance maps for select Georgia towns and cities dating from 1923-1941 now available for free online. “The Digital Library of Georgia has just made Sanborn fire insurance maps produced between 1923-1941 for 39 Georgia towns and cities in 35 counties freely available online.”

Reclaim the Records: The Mississippi Death Index goes online, for free! (Genealogy’s Star)

Genealogy’s Star: Reclaim the Records: The Mississippi Death Index goes online, for free!. “Introducing the first-ever freely-available publication, online or otherwise, of the Mississippi Statewide Death Index! This record set covers deaths in the state of Mississippi from about November 1912 (although a few counties were slow to join in) through 1943.”

Rediscovering Indian thought: How a scholar built a database of pre-Independence magazines (Scroll)

Scroll: Rediscovering Indian thought: How a scholar built a database of pre-Independence magazines. “The database indexes 315,000 entries from 255 English-language periodicals that were published between 1837 and 1947. It is, and will always be, a free resource. The database would not exist were it not for the immense hard work by a core group of research assistants – Meghna Basu, Christian Fastenrath, and Nidhi Shukla – and the help of hundreds of students and libraries around the world, and more than $350,000 in grants.” I loved this article until I started thinking about all the other endangered archives in the world and how much irreplaceable history may have been sold as waste paper.

Daily Finland: Finnish missions abroad expand historical archives

Daily Finland: Finnish missions abroad expand historical archives. “As part of its centenary celebration in March 2018, the Foreign Ministry published reports from the Finnish diplomatic missions abroad dating from before 1927. The Ministry has now expanded its digitised service to include reports from the missions until 1945, when the Second World War ended.”

Windsor Star: History project on Windsor’s modern women unearths compelling tales

Windsor Star: History project on Windsor’s modern women unearths compelling tales. “Windsor women who were in their teens and early 20s in the 1920s and 1930s — also known as Modern Girls — have had their lives and experiences archived on a new website [Matthew] McLaughlin and two other University of Windsor history students are launching at a public event Thursday. Comprised of 1,400 photographs, advertisements, newspaper articles, memorabilia and oral histories, the digital archive showcases local women’s history like nothing before it.”