Reclaim the Records: The Mississippi Death Index goes online, for free! (Genealogy’s Star)

Genealogy’s Star: Reclaim the Records: The Mississippi Death Index goes online, for free!. “Introducing the first-ever freely-available publication, online or otherwise, of the Mississippi Statewide Death Index! This record set covers deaths in the state of Mississippi from about November 1912 (although a few counties were slow to join in) through 1943.”

Rediscovering Indian thought: How a scholar built a database of pre-Independence magazines (Scroll)

Scroll: Rediscovering Indian thought: How a scholar built a database of pre-Independence magazines. “The database indexes 315,000 entries from 255 English-language periodicals that were published between 1837 and 1947. It is, and will always be, a free resource. The database would not exist were it not for the immense hard work by a core group of research assistants – Meghna Basu, Christian Fastenrath, and Nidhi Shukla – and the help of hundreds of students and libraries around the world, and more than $350,000 in grants.” I loved this article until I started thinking about all the other endangered archives in the world and how much irreplaceable history may have been sold as waste paper.

Daily Finland: Finnish missions abroad expand historical archives

Daily Finland: Finnish missions abroad expand historical archives. “As part of its centenary celebration in March 2018, the Foreign Ministry published reports from the Finnish diplomatic missions abroad dating from before 1927. The Ministry has now expanded its digitised service to include reports from the missions until 1945, when the Second World War ended.”

Windsor Star: History project on Windsor’s modern women unearths compelling tales

Windsor Star: History project on Windsor’s modern women unearths compelling tales. “Windsor women who were in their teens and early 20s in the 1920s and 1930s — also known as Modern Girls — have had their lives and experiences archived on a new website [Matthew] McLaughlin and two other University of Windsor history students are launching at a public event Thursday. Comprised of 1,400 photographs, advertisements, newspaper articles, memorabilia and oral histories, the digital archive showcases local women’s history like nothing before it.”

‘An invaluable resource’ for provenance research: German pre-1945 auction catalogues are published online (The Art Newspaper)

The Art Newspaper: ‘An invaluable resource’ for provenance research: German pre-1945 auction catalogues are published online. “Around 9,000 catalogues from more than 390 auction houses in Germany, Austria and Switzerland dating from 1901 to 1945 are now available online, a new resource that art-market historians and provenance researchers seeking to trace and identify Nazi-looted art say is invaluable to their work.”

Popular Music in Movies and Television, 1920s – 1981

Another find via Reddit: a database covering popular music in movies and television from the 1920s to 1981. It’s called Lights, Camera Backbeat. From the About page: “LCB starts at the beginning of synchronised sound and film with early Vitaphone and Phonofilm musical shorts in the 1920’s and continues up to the birth of MTV in 1981. The 1980’s launched a new era in music on film with a massive increase in music videos produced for TV use as well as home video product on VCR and Betamax. Prior to 1981 there were often only limited chances to see major pop music performers on TV and in the cinema, particularly if you lived outside the USA.” I did a couple of quick searches; the database did not contain Paul Anka’s performances in GIRLS TOWN and did not contain Mamie Van Doren’s songs from UNTAMED YOUTH. So lots of results, but nowhere near complete.

DigitalNC: The Concord Times is now available on DigitalNC!

DigitalNC: The Concord Times is now available on DigitalNC!. “520 issues of The Concord Times from 1923 to 1927 have recently been digitized and added to DigitalNC thanks to a nomination from our partner Cabarrus County Public Library! The paper from Concord, North Carolina, documents 1920s happenings around the town, the state, and beyond.”