DigitalNC: Twenty years of The Chowan Herald are now available on DigitalNC

DigitalNC: Twenty years of The Chowan Herald are now available on DigitalNC. “Twenty years worth of The Chowan Herald has recently been transferred to a digital format from a microfilm one, and these issues are now available on DigitalNC. These new additions cover Edenton’s news from 1934 until 1956 and cover all manner of Chowan County news. This paper is made available thanks to our new partner Shepard-Pruden Memorial Library.”

DigitalNC: Over one hundred more issues of the Greensboro High School newspaper are online now

DigitalNC: Over one hundred more issues of the Greensboro High School newspaper are online now. “Thanks to our partners at the Greensboro History Museum, DigitalNC is proud to announce more digitized issues of Greensboro High School’s (now Grimsley High School) student newspaper, High Life. This addition covers 1921 to 1939, which precedes the issues that had already been available from 1940 to 1978.”

The Japan Times: The Japan Times Archives expanded to include The Japan Advertiser 1913-1940

The Japan Times: The Japan Times Archives expanded to include The Japan Advertiser 1913-1940. “The Japan Times, Ltd. (Head Office: Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo. President: Mr. Takeharu Tsutsumi) has added new content — The Japan Advertiser (1913-1940) — to its digital archives, The Japan Times Archives (1897-2018). Published during a period encompassing the Taisho Period and the early Showa Era, The Japan Advertiser depicts the Japan of almost a century ago from the perspective of foreign journalists. The content includes news articles as well as stories aimed at foreigners living in Japan that introduced Japanese culture, and advertising that reflects the social and economic climate of those times.” The announcement notes that this archive is available only to institutional subscribers and not individuals (unfortunately).

DigitalNC: Newly Digitized Materials from Winston Salem’s African-American Community Now Online

DigitalNC: Newly Digitized Materials from Winston Salem’s African-American Community Now Online. “We have added materials that capture some of Winston Salem’s rich African-American history from 1930 to 1990, courtesy of the Winston Salem African American Archive. Included in this batch are several editions of The Columbian, the student newspaper for Columbian Heights High School, and articles from other local papers highlighting notable community members and events.”

University of Arkansas: Libraries Digitize First Issues of Arkansas Traveler Student Newspaper

University of Arkansas: Libraries Digitize First Issues of Arkansas Traveler Student Newspaper. “The University Libraries have digitized the first issues of the Arkansas Traveler student newspaper from 1907 to 1947. The first phase of the digital project is composed of 1,042 issues or roughly 4,780 single scans.”

Boston Public Library’s 78rpm Records Come to the Internet: Reformatting the Boston Public Library Sound Archives (Internet Archive)

Internet Archive: Boston Public Library’s 78rpm Records Come to the Internet: Reformatting the Boston Public Library Sound Archives. “Following eighteen months of work, more than 50,000 78rpm record ‘sides’ from the Boston Public Library’s sound archives have now been digitized and made freely available online by the Internet Archive.” I listened to a Cab Calloway song from 1946 (“Hey Now, Hey Now” if you care) and while it did have pops and crackles I was surprised at how good the sound quality was.

Fordham University: Rich Conaty’s Big Broadcast Lives on in New Digital Archive

Fordham University: Rich Conaty’s Big Broadcast Lives on in New Digital Archive. “When Rich Conaty died in late 2016, the WFUV DJ left behind a devoted following of listeners, some of whom had been tuning in for more than 40 years to hear him spin jazz and pop from the 1920s and ’30s on his Sunday night show, The Big Broadcast. Luckily for fans, hundreds of episodes from The Big Broadcast’s archive are now available to stream on Fordham’s Digital Collections page, thanks to a generous donor and a collaborative effort between WFUV and the University Library.”