Jisc: Digital history of science collection ready to launch with nearly one million pages

Jisc: Digital history of science collection ready to launch with nearly one million pages. “For the first time researchers, teachers and students can access digitally more than 90% of the British Association for the Advancement of Science – Collections on the History of Science (1830s-1970s). Free to Jisc members and affiliates, the move to digitise this collection, much of which was previously unpublished, began in 2020, when leading UK university libraries and archives were invited to put forward their archives.”

DutchNews: Digitalised Holland Amerika line passenger lists reveal famous names

DutchNews: Digitalised Holland Amerika line passenger lists reveal famous names. “Volunteers have digitalised some 150,000 handwritten passenger lists naming people who travelled on the Holland Amerika Line (HAL) between Rotterdam and the United States. The digital archive, which is kept at the Rotterdam city archive and accessible to the public, covers the period between 1900 and 1969 when millions of people made the journey and took three years to complete.”

Dublin City University: Seán Lester Collection Published On DRI

Dublin City University: Seán Lester Collection Published On DRI. DRI is Digital Repository of Ireland. “Lester, one of Ireland’s foremost diplomats, became High Commissioner in Danzig in 1934, during a period of increasing Nazi control of the city. He returned to Geneva in 1937, and was appointed Deputy Secretary General of the League of Nations in 1940, remaining there until the functions of the League were replaced by the United Nations in 1946. The collection contains diaries kept by Lester from 1935 to 1942.”

State Archives of North Carolina: Aycock Brown Photographs Digital Collection

State Archives of North Carolina: Aycock Brown Photographs Digital Collection. “Charles Brantley ‘Aycock’ Brown was a journalist and photographer who moved to Ocracoke in the 1920s. He is largely credited with helping advance tourism in the Outer Banks. Aycock Brown documented the development of the Outer Banks from the 1920s into the 1960s. He would often take pictures of major events, people on the street, development projects, and anything he found interesting.”

Digital NC: Issues of The Roanoke Beacon Newspaper, from 1930-1956, Added to DigitalNC

Digital NC: Issues of The Roanoke Beacon Newspaper, from 1930-1956, Added to DigitalNC. “Additional issues of The Roanoke Beacon and Washington County News, published out of Plymouth, NC, are now online thanks to funding from the North Caroliniana Society. This newspaper was recommended for digitization by the Washington County Library which is part of Pettigrew Regional Library. With these additions, you can now search the newspaper from 1899 to 1956.”

The Advocate: Southern University’s library tells more stories of former slaves as it expands online archives

The Advocate: Southern University’s library tells more stories of former slaves as it expands online archives. “The John B. Cade Library at Southern University recently expanded its online archive of slave stories, accounts told by former slaves who were interviewed in the late 1930s and early 1940s. The stories further a collection that had been compiled by the library’s namesake, who began collecting them even before serving as a dean at Southern from 1939-61.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Historic holiday menus created at the former Army post at Fort Oglethorpe from 1925-1940 are now available freely online in the Digital Library of Georgia

Digital Library of Georgia: Historic holiday menus created at the former Army post at Fort Oglethorpe from 1925-1940 are now available freely online in the Digital Library of Georgia. “The Digital Library of Georgia (DLG) has partnered with the 6th Cavalry Museum to digitize its collection of historic holiday menus created at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia from 1925-1940, thanks to a digitization grant awarded by the DLG…. Holiday menus combine economic, cultural, and social histories of holidays as well as food and cooking history. Some of these menus also include rosters of US military personnel, as well as guests and family members.”

New Photos: Buffalo Soldiers at West Point (National Archives News)

National Archives News: New Photos: Buffalo Soldiers at West Point. “Photographs of Buffalo Soldiers serving at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, NY, during the early 20th century recently came to light at the National Archives. The images were discovered by a preservationist who was digitizing thousands of nitrate negatives transferred from the Academy to the Still Picture Branch of the National Archives at College Park, MD. Recognized for their expertise in riding, African American cavalry noncommissioned officers of the 9th and 10th Cavalry Regiments were stationed at West Point to serve in the Academy’s Detachment of Cavalry and teach Academy cadets military horsemanship.”

KGUN: 3 African American military newspapers from Fort Huachuca digitized

KGUN: 3 African American military newspapers from Fort Huachuca digitized. “The three newspapers came out of the fort in the 1920s through the 1940s. During that period of history, three infantry divisions at Fort Huachuca were made up of black men. The 25th, 92nd and 93rd. Each had their own unique newsletter designed to keep families of those soldiers up-to-date with what they were doing.”

Lancaster University: Lancaster project captures the glamour and glitz of cinema in the 1930s and beyond

Lancaster University: Lancaster project captures the glamour and glitz of cinema in the 1930s and beyond . “Photographs of fabulous film stars and fascinating interviews form part of a stunning new online showcase to capture 1930s cinemagoing in Britain. The website, to help researchers and the public in their quest for information about the silver screen in the 1930s and beyond, has just been launched.”

Albany Times-Union: New website documents Albany during the swing era

Albany Times-Union: New website documents Albany during the swing era. “Mike Pantone was a banjo and guitar player born in 1900 who in his early 20s joined the King Jazz Orchestra, one of the most prominent bands of the era in Albany. Starting a few years later, Pantone formed several jazz ensembles of his own and ran a music school on lower Madison Avenue in the city, where he made enough of an impression on one of his students, the future author William Kennedy, whose baseball games Pantone umpired, that he ended up, in real or fictionalized form, in several of Kennedy’s books. Pantone, who also taught music in Voorheesville, in 1942 dropped dead in his home, at 342 Madison Ave. in Albany. That’s where Michael Catoggio found him, in a manner of speaking.”

Augusta Free Press: Records related to Shenandoah National Park creation now digitized

Augusta Free Press: Records related to Shenandoah National Park creation now digitized. “The Piedmont Environmental Council has completed the digitization of thousands of legal documents related to the Commonwealth’s 1930s-era condemnation of private lands in Rappahannock County for the creation of Shenandoah National Park. The digitization project has made all of the deed book records, court proceedings and individual case files for Rappahannock County properties that are now part of Shenandoah National Park, publicly accessible and searchable for the first time.”

New York Times: Beba’s Story Tells of Jewish Life Before the Nazis

New York Times: Beba’s Story Tells of Jewish Life Before the Nazis. “Three years ago, a large cache of artifacts, including poems, letters and notebooks by some of the greatest Yiddish writers of the first half of the 20th century, was discovered in the basement of a church in Vilnius, Lithuania. In scouring through them and other artifacts that had been rescued from Nazi efforts to destroy all traces of Jewish culture, researchers discovered a more humble document: the writing of a fifth-grade girl telling of her daily life in Vilnius in the 1930s. Now that girl, whose name was Americanized to Beba Epstein, is the central character of a YIVO Institute for Jewish Research exhibition that went up online recently.”