State Archives of North Carolina: Aycock Brown Photographs Digital Collection

State Archives of North Carolina: Aycock Brown Photographs Digital Collection. “Charles Brantley ‘Aycock’ Brown was a journalist and photographer who moved to Ocracoke in the 1920s. He is largely credited with helping advance tourism in the Outer Banks. Aycock Brown documented the development of the Outer Banks from the 1920s into the 1960s. He would often take pictures of major events, people on the street, development projects, and anything he found interesting.”

Brownstoner: Newly Digitized Negatives Give a Glimpse of Mid-Century Life Around Pratt Institute

Brownstoner: Newly Digitized Negatives Give a Glimpse of Mid-Century Life Around Pratt Institute. “Taken between 1957 and 1973 by the Pratt Institute Photo Department, the negatives sat in a filing cabinet largely inaccessible to researchers until efforts to scan the almost 30,000 individual images began in 2019.” Pratt Institute is located in Brooklyn, in New York City.

Digital NC: Issues of The Roanoke Beacon Newspaper, from 1930-1956, Added to DigitalNC

Digital NC: Issues of The Roanoke Beacon Newspaper, from 1930-1956, Added to DigitalNC. “Additional issues of The Roanoke Beacon and Washington County News, published out of Plymouth, NC, are now online thanks to funding from the North Caroliniana Society. This newspaper was recommended for digitization by the Washington County Library which is part of Pettigrew Regional Library. With these additions, you can now search the newspaper from 1899 to 1956.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Two mid-twentieth-century collections, now digitized and available freely online, recall Atlanta neighborhoods lost to urban renewal, and Georgia’s growing Catholic community

Digital Library of Georgia: Two mid-twentieth-century collections, now digitized and available freely online, recall Atlanta neighborhoods lost to urban renewal, and Georgia’s growing Catholic community. “Two new collections of digitized films and slides documenting the growth of Georgia’s Catholic community between 1938-1979 are now available freely online from the Digital Library of Georgia.”

The Advocate: Southern University’s library tells more stories of former slaves as it expands online archives

The Advocate: Southern University’s library tells more stories of former slaves as it expands online archives. “The John B. Cade Library at Southern University recently expanded its online archive of slave stories, accounts told by former slaves who were interviewed in the late 1930s and early 1940s. The stories further a collection that had been compiled by the library’s namesake, who began collecting them even before serving as a dean at Southern from 1939-61.”

KGUN: 3 African American military newspapers from Fort Huachuca digitized

KGUN: 3 African American military newspapers from Fort Huachuca digitized. “The three newspapers came out of the fort in the 1920s through the 1940s. During that period of history, three infantry divisions at Fort Huachuca were made up of black men. The 25th, 92nd and 93rd. Each had their own unique newsletter designed to keep families of those soldiers up-to-date with what they were doing.”

Delfi: Lithuania launches new website with detailed list of anti-Soviet resistance participants

Delfi: Lithuania launches new website with detailed list of anti-Soviet resistance participants. “The Genocide and Resistance Research Center of Lithuania has launched a new website… that contains the first publicly-accessible detailed list of participants of the Lithuania’s anti-Soviet resistance war of 1944-1953. The list is not final, the center says, and now includes 12,799 names, including those of people killed in the battlefield, executed by firing squad or those who died in prison.”

Albany Times-Union: New website documents Albany during the swing era

Albany Times-Union: New website documents Albany during the swing era. “Mike Pantone was a banjo and guitar player born in 1900 who in his early 20s joined the King Jazz Orchestra, one of the most prominent bands of the era in Albany. Starting a few years later, Pantone formed several jazz ensembles of his own and ran a music school on lower Madison Avenue in the city, where he made enough of an impression on one of his students, the future author William Kennedy, whose baseball games Pantone umpired, that he ended up, in real or fictionalized form, in several of Kennedy’s books. Pantone, who also taught music in Voorheesville, in 1942 dropped dead in his home, at 342 Madison Ave. in Albany. That’s where Michael Catoggio found him, in a manner of speaking.”

6 SqFt: Amazing archival photos show New York City in the 1940s and ’50s

6 SqFt: Amazing archival photos show New York City in the 1940s and ’50s. “Nonprofit advocacy and educational organization Village Preservation is well known for many things, one of which is its historic image archive. Their newest addition is the Jean Polacheck Collection, which dates largely from the 1940s through the mid-1950s, and includes scenes of Washington Square Park, the interior of clubs and restaurants, and other NYC street scenes.”

The Citizens: Old issues of Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin offer glimpse of agriculture in bygone times

The Citizens: Old issues of Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin offer glimpse of agriculture in bygone times. “Agriculture in Georgia has changed a lot over the years, but one thing that has remained constant is the Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin as the go-to resource for buying and selling livestock, farm supplies and equipment, handcrafted and homegrown items, as well as the latest agriculture and consumer news. Now, thanks to a partnership with the Georgia Department of Agriculture, the University of Georgia Map and Government Information Library (MAGIL), and the Digital Library of Georgia, Georgians can take a look back at the history of the Market Bulletin. More than 1,712 issues of the Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin dating from 1926-1963 are now available in the Georgia Government Publications online database.”

DigitalNC: The Zebulon Record, Now On DigitalNC

DigitalNC: The Zebulon Record, Now On DigitalNC. “Covering the years 1925-1956, The Zebulon Record focused on local agriculture, a main segment of Zebulon’s economy since its foundation in the early 1900’s. Tobacco, the largest local crop, is widely covered. Notices to farmers of agricultural events, such as a Boll Weevil Plague in 1941, were frequently reported.”

The California Aggie: The California Aggie first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize entire collection

The California Aggie: The California Aggie first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize entire collection. “The California Aggie, formerly known as The Weekly Agricola, is the first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize its entire historical collection. The California Digital Newspaper Collection (CDNC) — the online home of many historical editions of California-based periodicals — now showcases 5,410 issues of The Aggie. These issues date all the way back to the first issue of The Weekly Agricola on Sept. 29, 1915. The collection is broken down by year and month, has a keyword-search function and is available for download.” The Aggie is the newspaper of the University of California, Davis.