6 SqFt: Amazing archival photos show New York City in the 1940s and ’50s

6 SqFt: Amazing archival photos show New York City in the 1940s and ’50s. “Nonprofit advocacy and educational organization Village Preservation is well known for many things, one of which is its historic image archive. Their newest addition is the Jean Polacheck Collection, which dates largely from the 1940s through the mid-1950s, and includes scenes of Washington Square Park, the interior of clubs and restaurants, and other NYC street scenes.”

The Citizens: Old issues of Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin offer glimpse of agriculture in bygone times

The Citizens: Old issues of Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin offer glimpse of agriculture in bygone times. “Agriculture in Georgia has changed a lot over the years, but one thing that has remained constant is the Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin as the go-to resource for buying and selling livestock, farm supplies and equipment, handcrafted and homegrown items, as well as the latest agriculture and consumer news. Now, thanks to a partnership with the Georgia Department of Agriculture, the University of Georgia Map and Government Information Library (MAGIL), and the Digital Library of Georgia, Georgians can take a look back at the history of the Market Bulletin. More than 1,712 issues of the Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin dating from 1926-1963 are now available in the Georgia Government Publications online database.”

Brooklyn Paper: Park Sloper Maps Old Tax Photos On ‘1940s Street View’ Website

Brooklyn Paper: Park Sloper Maps Old Tax Photos On ‘1940s Street View’ Website. “A new website maps Depression-era tax photos of every building in the city, making it easier for researchers and history buffs to navigate several hundred thousand snapshots of buildings from 1940s New York City, according to the site’s Brooklyn creator.”

DigitalNC: The Zebulon Record, Now On DigitalNC

DigitalNC: The Zebulon Record, Now On DigitalNC. “Covering the years 1925-1956, The Zebulon Record focused on local agriculture, a main segment of Zebulon’s economy since its foundation in the early 1900’s. Tobacco, the largest local crop, is widely covered. Notices to farmers of agricultural events, such as a Boll Weevil Plague in 1941, were frequently reported.”

The California Aggie: The California Aggie first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize entire collection

The California Aggie: The California Aggie first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize entire collection. “The California Aggie, formerly known as The Weekly Agricola, is the first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize its entire historical collection. The California Digital Newspaper Collection (CDNC) — the online home of many historical editions of California-based periodicals — now showcases 5,410 issues of The Aggie. These issues date all the way back to the first issue of The Weekly Agricola on Sept. 29, 1915. The collection is broken down by year and month, has a keyword-search function and is available for download.” The Aggie is the newspaper of the University of California, Davis.

DigitalNC: More Issues of the Greensboro Student Newspaper Added to DigitalNC

DigitalNC: More Issues of the Greensboro Student Newspaper Added to DigitalNC. “A gap in newspaper issues available from Greensboro, N.C. has now been filled thanks to our partners at the Greensboro History Museum. Close to 200 new issues of the Greensboro high school student newspaper, High Life, are ready to view online. These additions fill in years ranging from 1927 to 1958.”

Boing Boing: This cool online radio station lets you listen to popular songs from any decade and country from 1900 to now

Boing Boing: This cool online radio station lets you listen to popular songs from any decade and country from 1900 to now. “When you go to Radiooooo you see a map of the world. You click on any country on the map, and select a decade beginning with 1900. It will start playing music from that country and decade.” I tried United States / 1940s and the site started playing a lovely little groove called “Hot Dog” by Chris Powell & The Five Blue Flames.

Egypt’s golden age of cinema: hundreds of rare photos come to Abu Dhabi (The National)

The National: Egypt’s golden age of cinema: hundreds of rare photos come to Abu Dhabi . “More than 600 never-before-seen photographs from Egyptian cinema have been released online by Akkasah, the Centre for Photography at NYU Abu Dhabi. The collection of photographs and negatives belonging to Samir Farid, a prominent Egyptian writer, scholar, and leading film critic, was donated to the centre. It features a wide range of negatives taken on sets of various Egyptian films, from publicity shots, to candid pictures of cast and crew, and images captured while filming behind the scenes.”

H-Announce: Digitized Field Recordings of Lorenzo Dow Turner

H-Announce: Digitized Field Recordings of Lorenzo Dow Turner. “The project digitized close to 40 hours of field recordings made by African American academic and linguist Lorenzo Dow Turner, known as the ‘Father of Gullah Studies.’ The recordings were made between 1932 and 1952, and cover a variety of geographical locations, from Nigeria and Cameroon to Brazil, as well as locations within the United States, where Turner encountered native speakers of Yoruba, Igbo, Portuguese, English, Creole and Gullah among other languages and various dialects. Turner used these recordings as evidence to trace the linguistic and cultural connections between West Africa and the Americas.”

Express & Star: Second World War photos to be preserved in Express & Star online archive

Express & Star: Second World War photos to be preserved in Express & Star online archive. “Hundreds of historic photographs dating back to the Second World War will be the next to be preserved for future generations as part of the Express & Star photo archive project.” There is already a substantial amount of content in the archive, which is why it gets filed under New instead of Around.

Rediscovering Indian thought: How a scholar built a database of pre-Independence magazines (Scroll)

Scroll: Rediscovering Indian thought: How a scholar built a database of pre-Independence magazines. “The database indexes 315,000 entries from 255 English-language periodicals that were published between 1837 and 1947. It is, and will always be, a free resource. The database would not exist were it not for the immense hard work by a core group of research assistants – Meghna Basu, Christian Fastenrath, and Nidhi Shukla – and the help of hundreds of students and libraries around the world, and more than $350,000 in grants.” I loved this article until I started thinking about all the other endangered archives in the world and how much irreplaceable history may have been sold as waste paper.

Daily Finland: Finnish missions abroad expand historical archives

Daily Finland: Finnish missions abroad expand historical archives. “As part of its centenary celebration in March 2018, the Foreign Ministry published reports from the Finnish diplomatic missions abroad dating from before 1927. The Ministry has now expanded its digitised service to include reports from the missions until 1945, when the Second World War ended.”

‘An invaluable resource’ for provenance research: German pre-1945 auction catalogues are published online (The Art Newspaper)

The Art Newspaper: ‘An invaluable resource’ for provenance research: German pre-1945 auction catalogues are published online. “Around 9,000 catalogues from more than 390 auction houses in Germany, Austria and Switzerland dating from 1901 to 1945 are now available online, a new resource that art-market historians and provenance researchers seeking to trace and identify Nazi-looted art say is invaluable to their work.”

Popular Music in Movies and Television, 1920s – 1981

Another find via Reddit: a database covering popular music in movies and television from the 1920s to 1981. It’s called Lights, Camera Backbeat. From the About page: “LCB starts at the beginning of synchronised sound and film with early Vitaphone and Phonofilm musical shorts in the 1920’s and continues up to the birth of MTV in 1981. The 1980’s launched a new era in music on film with a massive increase in music videos produced for TV use as well as home video product on VCR and Betamax. Prior to 1981 there were often only limited chances to see major pop music performers on TV and in the cinema, particularly if you lived outside the USA.” I did a couple of quick searches; the database did not contain Paul Anka’s performances in GIRLS TOWN and did not contain Mamie Van Doren’s songs from UNTAMED YOUTH. So lots of results, but nowhere near complete.