Newark Advertiser (UK): More help needed to preserve our pictures from the past

Newark Advertiser (UK): More help needed to preserve our pictures from the past. “Thousands of images from the Advertiser’s photographic archive are now online thanks to a long-term project to safeguard them for future generations. They are working their way through thousands of old photographic negatives, some dating back to the 1940s. Because of their age, some of the negatives are becoming damaged or corroded so it is vital that they are digitalised.”

Library of Congress: Historical Versions of the United States Code Now Online

Library of Congress: Historical Versions of the United States Code Now Online . “More than 60 years of U.S. laws are now published online and accessible for free for the first time after being acquired by the Library of Congress. The Library has made available the main editions and supplements of the United States Code from 1925 through the 1988 edition. The U.S. Code is a compilation of federal laws arranged by subject by the Office of the Law Revision Counsel of the House of Representatives. The Library’s U.S. Code Collection is fully searchable. Filters allow users to narrow their searches by date, title and/or subject. PDF versions of each chapter can be viewed and downloaded.”

CNET: You can now watch 62 newly declassified nuclear test videos

CNET: You can now watch 62 newly declassified nuclear test videos. “Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California made a stir earlier this year when it released a group of Cold War-era atmospheric nuclear test videos that were declassified and approved for public viewing. We now have a sequel that’s just as devastating to watch as the first round. The laboratory’s latest batch includes 62 videos posted on Thursday.”

National Geographic: Maps Show How Tearing Down City Slums Displaced Thousands

National Geographic: Maps Show How Tearing Down City Slums Displaced Thousands. “Urban renewal projects changed the landscape of American cities in the 1950s and ‘60s. The federal government gave cities billions of dollars to tear down blighted areas and replace them with affordable housing. Or at least, that’s what was supposed to happen. In many places, there was a net loss of housing as city leaders decided instead to build offices or shopping malls, or to expand hospitals and universities. Urban renewal projects displaced more than 300,000 people between 1955 and 1966, and the burden fell disproportionately on people of color, according to a new analysis by the Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond, which has created a new website called Renewing Inequality packed with interactive maps and statistics on urban renewal projects.”

University of Maryland: UMD Student Newspapers Database Launched

University of Maryland: UMD Student Newspapers Database Launched. “The University Archives is proud to announce the public launch of the new UMD Student Newspapers database… which provides keyword and date access to issues of The Diamondback and its seven predecessor newspapers from 1910 to October 1971. Users can search names and topics across all the issues, as well as focusing in on a particular day, month, or year of publication or publication title. Content can also be isolated in an individual issue and saved as a jpg file, using the clipping tool provided on the website.”

Digital NC: Saint Mary’s Student School Newspaper now online

Digital NC: Saint Mary’s Student School Newspaper now online. “The Saint Mary’s School student newspaper, The Belles, is now online, from its origins as ‘The Grapevine’ in 1936 through 1995. The Belles continues to be published in an electronic form to this day. The paper gives a good look into the viewpoint of North Carolina teen women over a 60 year period.”

KCET: Bright Colors, Big City: One Man’s Massive Collection of Postwar California Print Media

New to me, from KCET: Bright Colors, Big City: One Man’s Massive Collection of Postwar California Print Media. “Inside a cheerful Koreatown home, the promise of post-war Los Angeles is spread across the kitchen table. It is but a fraction of the collection of J.J. Englender, curator of the vivid online archive ADSAUSAGE. There are local magazines, ad inserts, teen ‘zines, and trade brochures, all brightly colored and striking, advertising the growth and vibrancy of 1950s-‘80s California. They are the tangible embodiment of the dreams of Englender, a friendly, optimistic man, whose childhood love of 20th-century kitsch and Hollywood has grown into an archive of thousands of pieces.”