Knight First Amendment Institute: Newly Released Office of Legal Counsel Opinions from 1952-1971 Illuminate Government Policy During Civil Rights Era

Knight First Amendment Institute: Newly Released Office of Legal Counsel Opinions from 1952-1971 Illuminate Government Policy During Civil Rights Era. “The Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University today published for the first time a set of Office of Legal Counsel (OLC) memos authored between 1952 and 1971 pertaining to desegregation policies and civil rights law.”

World’s Largest Computing Society Makes Thousands of Research Articles Freely Available; Opens First 50 Years Backfile (Association for Computing Machinery)

This launched in early April, and where was I? Off somewhere eating bon-bons, apparently. Anyway, from ACM: World’s Largest Computing Society Makes Thousands of Research Articles Freely Available; Opens First 50 Years Backfile. “ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, today announced that its first 50 years of publications, from 1951 through the end of 2000, are now open and freely available to view and download via the ACM Digital Library. ACM’s first 50 years backfile contains more than 117,500 articles on a wide range of computing topics. In addition to articles published between 1951 and 2000, ACM has also opened related and supplemental materials including data sets, software, slides, audio recordings, and videos.”

Jisc: Digital history of science collection ready to launch with nearly one million pages

Jisc: Digital history of science collection ready to launch with nearly one million pages. “For the first time researchers, teachers and students can access digitally more than 90% of the British Association for the Advancement of Science – Collections on the History of Science (1830s-1970s). Free to Jisc members and affiliates, the move to digitise this collection, much of which was previously unpublished, began in 2020, when leading UK university libraries and archives were invited to put forward their archives.”

University of Leeds: Historic dialect recordings archive digitised for the public

University of Leeds: Historic dialect recordings archive digitised for the public. “During the 1950s and 60s, fieldworkers from the University travelled across the country to record the language and lifestyles of speakers across England, known as the Survey of English Dialects…. Now, the recordings can be heard by the public with the launch of the University’s Dialect and Heritage ‘In Your Words’ Project, led by the School of English and supported by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.”

Washington City Paper: Documenting D.C.’s Doo-Wop Histories

Launched last month but I’m just learning about it now, from the Washington City Paper: Documenting D.C.’s Doo-Wop Histories. “Working with a team of music scholars, [Beverly] Lindsay-Johnson has designed a detailed online platform that tells the story of Black D.C. rhythm and blues acts from the 1940s and ’50s, while documenting the local venues, radio stations, DJs, record stores, and history of that segregated time.”

University of Maryland: The (Digital) Sound of History

University of Maryland: The (Digital) Sound of History. “Nearly 600 tapes from the late 1950s and 1960s have been newly digitized and made available in an online archive at the University of Maryland, ranging from short interviews of newsmakers and collections of daily stories to longer reviews of and debates on events. They were produced by the Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, a division of the Westinghouse Electric Corporation that launched a Washington, D.C.-based radio news bureau in 1957 and provided syndicated material to stations across the country like the Associated Press did for print newspapers.”

Oprah Daily: The Black Beauty Archives Are Preserving an Important Piece of Black History

New-to-me, from Oprah Daily: The Black Beauty Archives Are Preserving an Important Piece of Black History. “The Black Beauty Archives is a digital and physical library of vintage beauty products, media, recorded oral histories, transcribed beauty rituals, and images of, by, or for Black women from the 1950s to the present. ‘This is the beginning of a snowball effect that will transform how Black beauty is not only documented and preserved but discussed with nuance from a scholarly perspective,’ says makeup artist and makeup historian Michela Wariebi, who serves as beauty historian of the Black Beauty Archives. “

DutchNews: Digitalised Holland Amerika line passenger lists reveal famous names

DutchNews: Digitalised Holland Amerika line passenger lists reveal famous names. “Volunteers have digitalised some 150,000 handwritten passenger lists naming people who travelled on the Holland Amerika Line (HAL) between Rotterdam and the United States. The digital archive, which is kept at the Rotterdam city archive and accessible to the public, covers the period between 1900 and 1969 when millions of people made the journey and took three years to complete.”

University of Georgia: UGA Libraries to enhance access to archives on local urban renewal projects

University of Georgia: UGA Libraries to enhance access to archives on local urban renewal projects. “In January, the University of Georgia Libraries will begin a two-year effort to digitize its archival collections related to urban renewal projects in Athens during the 1960s and 1970s. The project, funded by UGA’s Office of the President, will provide free online access to thousands of pages of documents, surveys, reports, historic maps and photographs, correspondence and other materials held by the university’s Special Collections Libraries. Once digitized, this material will be openly available through the Digital Library of Georgia, a statewide initiative based at UGA.”

Pulp Fiction and Cartography Collide: Mapback Index

Recently I met Molly Brower on Twitter and learned about her Web site, Mapback Index: http://www.mapbackindex.com/mapbackindex/. From the About page: “The Dell ‘mapbacks’ were paperbacks published by Dell in the 1940s and 1950s. They were primarily genre books—mostly mysteries, Westerns, and romances. Many of them were written by authors who were famous at the time; many by authors who became famous later; and quite a few were written by authors who never published another book. The front covers were striking, and the back covers featured stylized maps of locales that featured in the books: sometimes whole towns (real or fictional), sometimes neighborhoods, often apartments or other buildings that were the scene of a crime.” The site has information on about 500 books.

State Archives of North Carolina: Aycock Brown Photographs Digital Collection

State Archives of North Carolina: Aycock Brown Photographs Digital Collection. “Charles Brantley ‘Aycock’ Brown was a journalist and photographer who moved to Ocracoke in the 1920s. He is largely credited with helping advance tourism in the Outer Banks. Aycock Brown documented the development of the Outer Banks from the 1920s into the 1960s. He would often take pictures of major events, people on the street, development projects, and anything he found interesting.”

Brownstoner: Newly Digitized Negatives Give a Glimpse of Mid-Century Life Around Pratt Institute

Brownstoner: Newly Digitized Negatives Give a Glimpse of Mid-Century Life Around Pratt Institute. “Taken between 1957 and 1973 by the Pratt Institute Photo Department, the negatives sat in a filing cabinet largely inaccessible to researchers until efforts to scan the almost 30,000 individual images began in 2019.” Pratt Institute is located in Brooklyn, in New York City.

Digital NC: Issues of The Roanoke Beacon Newspaper, from 1930-1956, Added to DigitalNC

Digital NC: Issues of The Roanoke Beacon Newspaper, from 1930-1956, Added to DigitalNC. “Additional issues of The Roanoke Beacon and Washington County News, published out of Plymouth, NC, are now online thanks to funding from the North Caroliniana Society. This newspaper was recommended for digitization by the Washington County Library which is part of Pettigrew Regional Library. With these additions, you can now search the newspaper from 1899 to 1956.”