UCLA: UCLA to restore student films involving The Doors’ Ray Manzarek and Jim Morrison

UCLA: UCLA to restore student films involving The Doors’ Ray Manzarek and Jim Morrison. “The pair, who met on campus when Morrison was a senior and Manzarek was a graduate student, became household names by the late 60s, along with bandmates Robby Krieger and John Densmore, and their early artistic endeavors as movie makers are at risk of being forgotten as time takes its toll on the original reels….With this in mind, the UCLA Film and Television Archive launched the Ray Manzarek and Jim Morrison Preservation Project. The campaign being conducted on UCLA Spark, UCLA’s crowdfunding platform, began Feb. 12 on what would have been Manzarek’s 80th birthday. It closes April 1. To date, nearly $40,000 has been raised.”

Britain from the air: 1945-2009 (University of Cambridge)

University of Cambridge: Britain from the air: 1945-2009. “Aerial photographs of Britain from the 1940s to 2009 – dubbed the ‘historical Google Earth’ by Cambridge academics – have been made freely available to everyone on Cambridge University Library’s ground-breaking Digital Library.”

State Archives of North Carolina Launches Flickr Album of Vietnam War Photos

The State Archives of North Carolina has put up a new photo album on Flickr. It’s called Ernest W. Payne Vietnam War Images and it’s over 300 images covering 1967 and 1968. Be sure to click on the “show more” link on the front page with the description of the album, as it’ll give you a full biography of Staff Sergeant Payne, supply officer and Bronze Star recipient.

Curbed New York: The unsung modernist treasures of Queens

New-to-me, from Curbed New York: The unsung modernist treasures of Queens. “In Bayside, Queens, the American Martyrs Roman-Catholic church sits proudly on a street corner, standing in high relief compared to the single-family homes nearby. It’s circular and covered in yellow bricks, with a folded-plate copper roof that’s aged into a mossy shade of green…. It’s a fine building designed by John O’Malley, one of the most prolific ecclesiastical architects in Brooklyn and Queens. You won’t find the church in most history books about modern architecture, but it is included in Queens Modern, a digital archive composed of adaptations of the movement in New York City’s largest borough, which was updated at the end of December to include deeper dives into over a dozen firms active during the mid-20th-century.” There appears to be some concern in the comments that not everything included is “real” modernist. I don’t know enough about architecture to judge.

Kids love Queen: How social media, YouTube keep classic rock alive (UPI)

UPI: Kids love Queen: How social media, YouTube keep classic rock alive. “The success of Golden Globe-winning Freddie Mercury biopic Bohemian Rhapsody has rocketed the music of Queen back into the popular zeitgeist, but evidence suggests the band and its classic rock contemporaries might owe much of their enduring appeal to the influence of social media.”

Vintage L.A. Forever: This Archivist Is Preserving Los Angeles Pop History In A Massive Digital Archive (L.A. Taco)

New-to-me, from L.A. Taco: Vintage L.A. Forever: This Archivist Is Preserving Los Angeles Pop History In A Massive Digital Archive. “Before he started preserving vintage Los Angeles, J. J. Englender visualized his life as a vintage movie montage. When he was 22, he got on a motorcycle in Venice Beach, hit the clutch, turned the throttle, and rolled right onto a 405 traffic jam. ‘I envisioned it being more of a cinematic journey across the vast landscapes and meeting all sorts of people, a la Easy Rider meets Vanishing Point,’ Englender told L.A. Taco…. Today, Englender is a cultural archivist, which means he keeps popular history alive in the form of a massive digital archive – like this collection of LA Weekly covers – known as ADSAUSAGE. The eclectic collection includes a lot of defunct L.A. publications, vintage car ads, fashion catalogs, and more.”

Times Colonist: History available at your fingertips in online archive

Times Colonist: History available at your fingertips in online archive. “Back issues of the Colonist are more accessible than ever before, thanks to a digitization project led by the University of Victoria. Back issues from 1858 to 1970 are online… and the 1970s will be added early in 2019. As John Lutz, a history professor at the University of Victoria, has said, the website is a game-changer in historical research in B.C.”