The American Legion: Discover Legion history with more than 50 years of digitized newsletters

The American Legion: Discover Legion history with more than 50 years of digitized newsletters. “The American Legion Library & Museum works to encourage membership growth and public support of the Legion by providing access to key documents that tell the national organization’s continuing story. In our most recent initiative, the Library & Museum has completed the digitization of more than 50 years of American Legion national newsletters. These newsletters cover a timeframe, 1950-2000, that complements previously digitized material.”

DigitalNC: Newly Digitized Materials from Winston Salem’s African-American Community Now Online

DigitalNC: Newly Digitized Materials from Winston Salem’s African-American Community Now Online. “We have added materials that capture some of Winston Salem’s rich African-American history from 1930 to 1990, courtesy of the Winston Salem African American Archive. Included in this batch are several editions of The Columbian, the student newspaper for Columbian Heights High School, and articles from other local papers highlighting notable community members and events.”

National Archives: Declassified Records Shed Light on Argentine History

National Archives: Declassified Records Shed Light on Argentine History. “The largest government-to-government declassification release in United States history, the latest release represents the final stage of an effort by the U.S. Government to search, identify, review for public access, and provide records that shed light on human-rights abuses in Argentina between 1975 and 1984, committed during the military dictatorship of that nation (1976–1983).”

Britain from the air: 1945-2009 (University of Cambridge)

University of Cambridge: Britain from the air: 1945-2009. “Aerial photographs of Britain from the 1940s to 2009 – dubbed the ‘historical Google Earth’ by Cambridge academics – have been made freely available to everyone on Cambridge University Library’s ground-breaking Digital Library.”

New Digital Collection: GCAM Archive (University of Houston Libraries)

University of Houston Libraries: New Digital Collection: GCAM Archive. “More than 30 years of Houston LGBTQ history is preserved and presented in this collection from the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum of GLBT History (GCAM). The collection contains over 150 LGBT newspapers from central Texas, the Dallas/Fort Worth area, and other Texas regions, from the 1970s through the early 2000s.”

H-HistBibl: Launch of the digital archive “The Long Emergency. Media and Democracy in India”

H-HistBibl: Launch of the digital archive “The Long Emergency. Media and Democracy in India”. “The government of India declared a national emergency citing internal instability in June 1975. By June 26th, the day after emergency had been declared, media outlets in the country had received instructions on news that must be censored. Some newspapers ran blank editorials as protests. In the eighteen months that followed, the press censorship rules remained in effect and additional forms of pressure were exerted on the media. These ranged from the withdrawal of state advertisements to income tax raids on media owners and phone calls to journalists conveying ‘helpful suggestions’ about the news they might (or might not) carry. Many journalists were arrested for protesting the emergency, or for holding views that were considered inimical to state authority. Many others supported the emergency as a necessary measure. Most, however, lay low until the emergency was lifted and the media began reporting actively on the news that they had not covered in the years of the emergency, in a burst of ‘new journalism’ that would shine a light on post-emergency abuses of power as well.”

Curbed New York: The unsung modernist treasures of Queens

New-to-me, from Curbed New York: The unsung modernist treasures of Queens. “In Bayside, Queens, the American Martyrs Roman-Catholic church sits proudly on a street corner, standing in high relief compared to the single-family homes nearby. It’s circular and covered in yellow bricks, with a folded-plate copper roof that’s aged into a mossy shade of green…. It’s a fine building designed by John O’Malley, one of the most prolific ecclesiastical architects in Brooklyn and Queens. You won’t find the church in most history books about modern architecture, but it is included in Queens Modern, a digital archive composed of adaptations of the movement in New York City’s largest borough, which was updated at the end of December to include deeper dives into over a dozen firms active during the mid-20th-century.” There appears to be some concern in the comments that not everything included is “real” modernist. I don’t know enough about architecture to judge.