Nikkei Asia: Vinyl production finds groove in Japan, thanks to social media

Nikkei Asia: Vinyl production finds groove in Japan, thanks to social media . “As ‘city pop,’ a type of Japanese pop music produced in the 1970s and ’80s, wins a new generation of fans around the world, production of phonograph records, the principal medium for recorded music at the time, has more than quadrupled over the past decade in Japan. As city pop gains more exposure through TikTok and other video hosting apps, it has drawn young people to vinyl records, which offer a listening experience that differs from digital music. More artists these days are also releasing new music on records.”

After 50 Years, Digital Voices Speak Again: A chance conversation revives speech digitization samples from 1973 (IEEE Spectrum)

IEEE Spectrum: After 50 Years, Digital Voices Speak Again A chance conversation revives speech digitization samples from 1973 . “This flexi disc is, in effect, an audio time capsule preserving the state of speech digitization research in the early 1970s. (It is telling, for example, that women’s voices are not represented in any of the sound samples.) Yet despite its historical significance, its contents remained buried within the pages of a half-century-old Spectrum back issue until this spring, when special projects editor Stephen Cass brought it to my attention following a meeting of the magazine’s editorial advisory board.”

Central Jersey: New Jersey Network collection added to American Archive of Public Broadcasting

Central Jersey: New Jersey Network collection added to American Archive of Public Broadcasting . “The American Archive of Public Broadcasting (AAPB) has released the New Jersey Network (NJN) Special Collection, featuring more than 3,000 streaming programs from New Jersey public television dating from 1971 to 2011. The growing collection will eventually include nearly 25,000 items representing 40 years of programs from one of the largest producers of local public television in the United States, covering governmental, cultural and historic affairs, according to a press release.”

Ars Technica: Tonight we’re gonna log on like it’s 1979

Ars Technica: Tonight we’re gonna log on like it’s 1979. “Teletypes may have killed a lot of forests by emitting every line to hard copy instead of a screen, but there’s something to be said for the permanence of paper. While working on building a functional Silent 700 Model 765 ASR teletype, I came across a set of teletype transcripts from several users logging on to The Source, one of the earliest online services, and a complete photocopy of the service’s user manual.”

Globe NewsWire: Historical Big Wave Surf Television Archive Acquired by Opper Films (PRESS RELEASE)

GlobeNewswire: Historical Big Wave Surf Television Archive Acquired by Opper Films (PRESS RELEASE). “Opper Films, home of the world’s largest historical surf film library, is stoked to announce the acquisition of twenty-two rare legendary surfing event titles and film footage from Larry Lindberg Productions, New York. Lindberg, a pioneer in sports television coverage in the early 1960s, was the first to package and produce televised surf competition for the major national television networks beginning with the 1965 Duke Kahanamoku Invitational Championships, the first event held at Sunset Beach, Hawaii.”

Revolting Gays: new website documents the South London Gay Community Centre and the Brixton gay squatting scene, 1970s – early1980s (Brixton Buzz)

Brixton Buzz (no relation): Revolting Gays: new website documents the South London Gay Community Centre and the Brixton gay squatting scene, 1970s – early1980s. “Telling the story of the South London Gay Community Centre and the Brixton gay squatting community from the 1970s to the early 1980s, the website documents a seemingly disparate group of gay men and their attempts to live together communally. Containing written text, photographs, podcasts, videos and art works, the Revolting Gays website will go live on June 24th this year.”

Fader: Creem returns with digital archive and new editorial staff

Fader: Creem returns with digital archive and new editorial staff . “Creem, a ’70s and ’80s rock rag that rivaled Rolling Stone in its heyday, has announced its relaunch as a digital publication, newsletter (‘Fresh Cream’), and quarterly print magazine. Its site will also feature a digitized version of every back issue from Creem‘s initial 20-year run, available to peruse with a 30-day free trial until August, at which point it will be bundled with subscriptions to the print quarterly.”

World’s Largest Computing Society Makes Thousands of Research Articles Freely Available; Opens First 50 Years Backfile (Association for Computing Machinery)

This launched in early April, and where was I? Off somewhere eating bon-bons, apparently. Anyway, from ACM: World’s Largest Computing Society Makes Thousands of Research Articles Freely Available; Opens First 50 Years Backfile. “ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, today announced that its first 50 years of publications, from 1951 through the end of 2000, are now open and freely available to view and download via the ACM Digital Library. ACM’s first 50 years backfile contains more than 117,500 articles on a wide range of computing topics. In addition to articles published between 1951 and 2000, ACM has also opened related and supplemental materials including data sets, software, slides, audio recordings, and videos.”

Jisc: Digital history of science collection ready to launch with nearly one million pages

Jisc: Digital history of science collection ready to launch with nearly one million pages. “For the first time researchers, teachers and students can access digitally more than 90% of the British Association for the Advancement of Science – Collections on the History of Science (1830s-1970s). Free to Jisc members and affiliates, the move to digitise this collection, much of which was previously unpublished, began in 2020, when leading UK university libraries and archives were invited to put forward their archives.”

Pitchfork: The Syrian Cassette Archives Explore a Pivotal Era of Middle Eastern Music

Pitchfork: The Syrian Cassette Archives Explore a Pivotal Era of Middle Eastern Music. “In February, he launched the website for the Syrian Cassette Archives, a multimedia project that focuses on a vibrant cassette culture that flourished in Syria from the 1970s to the 2000s. Since founding the project in 2018, [Mark] Gergis and a small group of collaborators have spent countless hours digitizing his collection of around 400 tapes. He’s also amassed new acquisitions of tapes and conducted interviews with artists and tape sellers from Syria.”

KCRW: SF disco is the sound of gay liberation. Historic reels go digital

New-to-me, from KCRW: SF disco is the sound of gay liberation. Historic reels go digital. “The SF Disco Preservation Society touts more than 2,000 records from when disco was the soundtrack of gay liberation, with queer men flocking to San Francisco, LA, and New York to dance, sing, and mingle. The archive is run singlehandedly by Jim Hopkins, who became a DJ at age 16 in 1981. He notes that many DJs in SF died of AIDS, and he wanted to preserve their legacies.” The archive is a Soundcloud collection of over 275 DJ sets of disco music. Most is from the 1970s or early 1980s, but there are few from the mid-90s.

City of Boston: City Archives Awarded Recordings At Risk Grant

City of Boston: City Archives Awarded Recordings At Risk Grant. “The Boston City Archives is thrilled to announce that it has been selected as the recipient of a $39,155 Recordings at Risk grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources. The grant will fund ‘Preserving Boston’s Voices: Digitizing the Boston 200 Community Oral History Collection’, a project to digitize oral history recordings of Boston residents collected as part of the Boston 200 Neighborhood History Program in the 1970s.”