Globe NewsWire: Historical Big Wave Surf Television Archive Acquired by Opper Films (PRESS RELEASE)

GlobeNewswire: Historical Big Wave Surf Television Archive Acquired by Opper Films (PRESS RELEASE). “Opper Films, home of the world’s largest historical surf film library, is stoked to announce the acquisition of twenty-two rare legendary surfing event titles and film footage from Larry Lindberg Productions, New York. Lindberg, a pioneer in sports television coverage in the early 1960s, was the first to package and produce televised surf competition for the major national television networks beginning with the 1965 Duke Kahanamoku Invitational Championships, the first event held at Sunset Beach, Hawaii.”

Revolting Gays: new website documents the South London Gay Community Centre and the Brixton gay squatting scene, 1970s – early1980s (Brixton Buzz)

Brixton Buzz (no relation): Revolting Gays: new website documents the South London Gay Community Centre and the Brixton gay squatting scene, 1970s – early1980s. “Telling the story of the South London Gay Community Centre and the Brixton gay squatting community from the 1970s to the early 1980s, the website documents a seemingly disparate group of gay men and their attempts to live together communally. Containing written text, photographs, podcasts, videos and art works, the Revolting Gays website will go live on June 24th this year.”

Fader: Creem returns with digital archive and new editorial staff

Fader: Creem returns with digital archive and new editorial staff . “Creem, a ’70s and ’80s rock rag that rivaled Rolling Stone in its heyday, has announced its relaunch as a digital publication, newsletter (‘Fresh Cream’), and quarterly print magazine. Its site will also feature a digitized version of every back issue from Creem‘s initial 20-year run, available to peruse with a 30-day free trial until August, at which point it will be bundled with subscriptions to the print quarterly.”

World’s Largest Computing Society Makes Thousands of Research Articles Freely Available; Opens First 50 Years Backfile (Association for Computing Machinery)

This launched in early April, and where was I? Off somewhere eating bon-bons, apparently. Anyway, from ACM: World’s Largest Computing Society Makes Thousands of Research Articles Freely Available; Opens First 50 Years Backfile. “ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, today announced that its first 50 years of publications, from 1951 through the end of 2000, are now open and freely available to view and download via the ACM Digital Library. ACM’s first 50 years backfile contains more than 117,500 articles on a wide range of computing topics. In addition to articles published between 1951 and 2000, ACM has also opened related and supplemental materials including data sets, software, slides, audio recordings, and videos.”

Jisc: Digital history of science collection ready to launch with nearly one million pages

Jisc: Digital history of science collection ready to launch with nearly one million pages. “For the first time researchers, teachers and students can access digitally more than 90% of the British Association for the Advancement of Science – Collections on the History of Science (1830s-1970s). Free to Jisc members and affiliates, the move to digitise this collection, much of which was previously unpublished, began in 2020, when leading UK university libraries and archives were invited to put forward their archives.”

Pitchfork: The Syrian Cassette Archives Explore a Pivotal Era of Middle Eastern Music

Pitchfork: The Syrian Cassette Archives Explore a Pivotal Era of Middle Eastern Music. “In February, he launched the website for the Syrian Cassette Archives, a multimedia project that focuses on a vibrant cassette culture that flourished in Syria from the 1970s to the 2000s. Since founding the project in 2018, [Mark] Gergis and a small group of collaborators have spent countless hours digitizing his collection of around 400 tapes. He’s also amassed new acquisitions of tapes and conducted interviews with artists and tape sellers from Syria.”

KCRW: SF disco is the sound of gay liberation. Historic reels go digital

New-to-me, from KCRW: SF disco is the sound of gay liberation. Historic reels go digital. “The SF Disco Preservation Society touts more than 2,000 records from when disco was the soundtrack of gay liberation, with queer men flocking to San Francisco, LA, and New York to dance, sing, and mingle. The archive is run singlehandedly by Jim Hopkins, who became a DJ at age 16 in 1981. He notes that many DJs in SF died of AIDS, and he wanted to preserve their legacies.” The archive is a Soundcloud collection of over 275 DJ sets of disco music. Most is from the 1970s or early 1980s, but there are few from the mid-90s.

City of Boston: City Archives Awarded Recordings At Risk Grant

City of Boston: City Archives Awarded Recordings At Risk Grant. “The Boston City Archives is thrilled to announce that it has been selected as the recipient of a $39,155 Recordings at Risk grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources. The grant will fund ‘Preserving Boston’s Voices: Digitizing the Boston 200 Community Oral History Collection’, a project to digitize oral history recordings of Boston residents collected as part of the Boston 200 Neighborhood History Program in the 1970s.”

Rebuilding the Vail Trail: With newspaper now digitized and searchable from 1965-1979, library fundraisers eyeing ’80s (Vail Daily)

Vail Daily: Rebuilding the Vail Trail: With newspaper now digitized and searchable from 1965-1979, library fundraisers eyeing ’80s. “The 1980s in Vail were an exciting time, and the Vail Trail newspaper captured the entire decade in print, appearing in newspaper boxes every Friday. Currently, however, it’s much easier to re-experience the 1970s via the Vail Trail than it is the 1980s, because the 1970s has been recently digitized and is available for free.”

Leighton Buzzard Observer: Relive some wonderful Stewkley memories as fascinating film archive goes online

Leighton Buzzard Observer: Relive some wonderful Stewkley memories as fascinating film archive goes online . “The YouTube portal is divided into sections. One of them, May Day 1959-96, includes sound films of 18 years of the annual event held at the village school, the first film being that of 1967. Other sections include: Ten Years Ago, Saving Stewkley (Airport Campaign), Fun & Games, Special Events, Village Hall, Church & Chapel, TV Programmes and Presentations and the Best of the Rest. A Featured Footage section changes regularly.” Stewkley is in Buckinghamshire, in southeast England.

Oprah Daily: The Black Beauty Archives Are Preserving an Important Piece of Black History

New-to-me, from Oprah Daily: The Black Beauty Archives Are Preserving an Important Piece of Black History. “The Black Beauty Archives is a digital and physical library of vintage beauty products, media, recorded oral histories, transcribed beauty rituals, and images of, by, or for Black women from the 1950s to the present. ‘This is the beginning of a snowball effect that will transform how Black beauty is not only documented and preserved but discussed with nuance from a scholarly perspective,’ says makeup artist and makeup historian Michela Wariebi, who serves as beauty historian of the Black Beauty Archives. “

NPR: 50 years ago, ‘Zoom’ spoke to children about their real lives

NPR: 50 years ago, ‘Zoom’ spoke to children about their real lives. “For pre-teens watching TV in the early 1970s, the opening to Zoom was captivating with seven, charismatic, barefoot kids in rugby shirts running, jumping, dancing and singing on a bare stage. They beckoned young viewers with the lyrics, ‘Come on and zoom, zoom, zoom-a zoom. You gotta zoom, zoom, zoom-a zoom.’… To celebrate Zoom’s 50th anniversary, the American Archive of Public Broadcasting has made more than 100 episodes available to stream online for the first time.”

University of Georgia: UGA Libraries to enhance access to archives on local urban renewal projects

University of Georgia: UGA Libraries to enhance access to archives on local urban renewal projects. “In January, the University of Georgia Libraries will begin a two-year effort to digitize its archival collections related to urban renewal projects in Athens during the 1960s and 1970s. The project, funded by UGA’s Office of the President, will provide free online access to thousands of pages of documents, surveys, reports, historic maps and photographs, correspondence and other materials held by the university’s Special Collections Libraries. Once digitized, this material will be openly available through the Digital Library of Georgia, a statewide initiative based at UGA.”