Unredacted: New Digital National Security Archive Collection Publishes Thousands of Declassified Nixon and Ford President’s Daily Briefs

Unredacted: New Digital National Security Archive Collection Publishes Thousands of Declassified Nixon and Ford President’s Daily Briefs. “The National Security Archive, with our partners at the scholarly publisher ProQuest, is publishing a new collection of declassified President’s Daily Briefs (PDBs) from the Nixon and Ford administrations. The collection, The President’s Daily Brief: Nixon, Ford, and the CIA, 1969-1977, offers researchers an unparalleled look into daily intelligence briefings provided to the White House by the CIA from 1969 to 1977.”

Screen Rant: Watch TV From The 70s, 80s, & 90s On This Cool Retro Website

Screen Rant: Watch TV From The 70s, 80s, & 90s On This Cool Retro Website. “A website called My Decade TV, created by Joey Cato, lets users watch TVs from the 70s, 80s, and 90s that offer a variety of different channels, including cartoons, game shows, movies, news, music videos, and more. Cato explains in the TV manual, which can be accessed below the TVs, that the websites were created because he wanted ‘to honor the pop culture memories of decades past.’ He went on to add that ‘each site aspires to simulate the vintage experience of channel-surfing on a TV from a particular era,’ so to support that, ‘channel content may not necessarily start playing from the beginning.'” This might be “just” a YouTube wrapper, but even if it is it’s ridiculously good. Warning: timesink.

Juxtapoz: Letterform Archive Release Online Archive of Counterculture Newspapers and Magazines from the 1960s and 70s

Juxtapoz: Letterform Archive Release Online Archive of Counterculture Newspapers and Magazines from the 1960s and 70s. “Letterform Archive has been creating some wonderful online collections for readers to browse, and a few days ago released a wonderful historic overview of ‘Counterculture Newspapers and Magazines’ of the 1960s and 70s, what LFA describes as ‘an explosion of independent publishing in the 1960s and ’70s(that) took advantage of new, accessible technology to spread countercultural messages around the world.'”

The California Aggie: The California Aggie first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize entire collection

The California Aggie: The California Aggie first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize entire collection. “The California Aggie, formerly known as The Weekly Agricola, is the first undergraduate UC newspaper to digitize its entire historical collection. The California Digital Newspaper Collection (CDNC) — the online home of many historical editions of California-based periodicals — now showcases 5,410 issues of The Aggie. These issues date all the way back to the first issue of The Weekly Agricola on Sept. 29, 1915. The collection is broken down by year and month, has a keyword-search function and is available for download.” The Aggie is the newspaper of the University of California, Davis.

Boing Boing: This cool online radio station lets you listen to popular songs from any decade and country from 1900 to now

Boing Boing: This cool online radio station lets you listen to popular songs from any decade and country from 1900 to now. “When you go to Radiooooo you see a map of the world. You click on any country on the map, and select a decade beginning with 1900. It will start playing music from that country and decade.” I tried United States / 1940s and the site started playing a lovely little groove called “Hot Dog” by Chris Powell & The Five Blue Flames.

Library of Congress: Photography Archive of Shawn Walker and a Collection of Harlem Photography Workshop Acquired by Library of Congress

Library of Congress: Photography Archive of Shawn Walker and a Collection of Harlem Photography Workshop Acquired by Library of Congress. “The Shawn Walker archive contains nearly 100,000 photographs, negatives and transparencies depicting life in Harlem — a pivotal crossroad of African diaspora culture — between 1963 and the present. The Kamoinge collection — generously donated by Walker — consists of nearly 2,500 items, including prints by Kamoinge members such as Barboza, Draper, Smith and others.”

University of Notre Dame: Quantum Interest

University of Notre Dame: Quantum Interest. “Published in Switzerland in the 1970s and 1980s, Epistemological Letters was a critical venue for work that was viewed as marginal by mainstream physicists of the era — work that would later contribute to important developments in areas such as quantum computing, quantum encryption and quantum teleportation. Think a Reddit for theoretical physicists.”

Zine Scene: Buffalo State Music Publications Preserved in New Digital Archive (Buffalo State College)

Buffalo State College: Zine Scene: Buffalo State Music Publications Preserved in New Digital Archive. “Long before music websites, blogs, and social media accounts provided a means of instant communication, fanzines—or zines—were one of the few ways for aspiring rock writers to get published. In the early to mid-1970s, Buffalo State College provided a supportive environment for students who embraced a do-it-yourself ethic to detail the burgeoning new music—punk, glam, and new wave—that was largely ignored by the mainstream press. With funding from United Students Government, two influential zines—the Shakin’ Street Gazette (SSG) and Foxtrot—were published and distributed throughout the city.”

How Dick Cavett Brought Sophistication to Late Night Talk Shows: Watch 270 Classic Interviews Online (Open Culture)

New-to-me, from Open Culture: How Dick Cavett Brought Sophistication to Late Night Talk Shows: Watch 270 Classic Interviews Online. “Just as the avuncular presence of Ed Sullivan helped ease middle America into accepting Elvis Presley and The Beatles, the aw-shucks midwestern charm of Dick Cavett made Woodstock hippies seem downright cuddly when he had Jefferson Airplane, David Crosby, and Joni Mitchell on just after the legendary music festival in 1969. He had a way of making everyone around him comfortable enough to reveal just a little more than they might otherwise.”

Egypt’s golden age of cinema: hundreds of rare photos come to Abu Dhabi (The National)

The National: Egypt’s golden age of cinema: hundreds of rare photos come to Abu Dhabi . “More than 600 never-before-seen photographs from Egyptian cinema have been released online by Akkasah, the Centre for Photography at NYU Abu Dhabi. The collection of photographs and negatives belonging to Samir Farid, a prominent Egyptian writer, scholar, and leading film critic, was donated to the centre. It features a wide range of negatives taken on sets of various Egyptian films, from publicity shots, to candid pictures of cast and crew, and images captured while filming behind the scenes.”

Brown University: Digitization of Historic Campus Speeches with CLIR Grant

Brown University: Digitization of Historic Campus Speeches with CLIR Grant . “The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) has awarded the Brown University Library $23,215 from its Recordings at Risk program. One of 13 projects selected out of 34 to receive grants from the program, the Library’s proposal, ‘Brown University Archives Audio-Visual Collection: Global Perspectives from Campus Speeches,’ will allow us to digitize and make available to the public a large selection of audio and video recordings of speeches by leading public figures invited to Brown between 1950 and 1995. “

Express & Star: Second World War photos to be preserved in Express & Star online archive

Express & Star: Second World War photos to be preserved in Express & Star online archive. “Hundreds of historic photographs dating back to the Second World War will be the next to be preserved for future generations as part of the Express & Star photo archive project.” There is already a substantial amount of content in the archive, which is why it gets filed under New instead of Around.

Calvert Journal: A digital archive is recovering half a century of communist Romania’s eclectic visual culture

Calvert Journal: A digital archive is recovering half a century of communist Romania’s eclectic visual culture. “Romanian culture zine Kajet Journal has launched a digital archive of the country’s communist-era print culture, marking 30 years since the December 1989 Revolution that toppled the country’s socialist regime. The research project makes hundreds of scans from books, booklets, DIY manuals, newspapers, and periodicals, produced between 1947 and 1989, available to the general public.”

WalesOnline: Classic Argos catalogues of the 70s, 80s and 90s are now available to browse online

WalesOnline: Classic Argos catalogues of the 70s, 80s and 90s are now available to browse online. “A staple of any child’s life in the run-up to the festive season – no matter which decade you grew up in – circling the toys you wanted in felt-pen or looking for what presents to buy the relatives was essential struff. And now Argos has digitised and uploaded 45 years of its catalogues on a new website called Book Of Dreams, featuring everything from vintage teasmades and early toploading video recorders of the ’70s and ’80s, to ’90s crazes such as Tamagotchis and Teletubbies.”

Popular Music in Movies and Television, 1920s – 1981

Another find via Reddit: a database covering popular music in movies and television from the 1920s to 1981. It’s called Lights, Camera Backbeat. From the About page: “LCB starts at the beginning of synchronised sound and film with early Vitaphone and Phonofilm musical shorts in the 1920’s and continues up to the birth of MTV in 1981. The 1980’s launched a new era in music on film with a massive increase in music videos produced for TV use as well as home video product on VCR and Betamax. Prior to 1981 there were often only limited chances to see major pop music performers on TV and in the cinema, particularly if you lived outside the USA.” I did a couple of quick searches; the database did not contain Paul Anka’s performances in GIRLS TOWN and did not contain Mamie Van Doren’s songs from UNTAMED YOUTH. So lots of results, but nowhere near complete.