Poz: Viewing the History of HIV Through AIDS Posters

Poz: Viewing the History of HIV Through AIDS Posters . “Three recent art exhibitions emphasize the pivotal role played by HIV and AIDS posters since the virus emerged in the early ’80s. Donald Albrecht drew from the poster collection of the University of Rochester’s River Campus Libraries’ Department of Rare Books, Special Collections and Preservation to curate Up Against the Wall: Art, Activism, and the AIDS Poster, which was presented at the University’s Memorial Art Gallery. Andy Campbell worked with the ONE Archives and ONE Archives Foundation to curate Days of Rage, a multimedia online exhibition featuring activists and designers discussing their work. Theodore (ted) Kerr organized the online exhibition AIDS, Posters & Stories of Public Health: A People’s History of a Pandemic for the National Library of Medicine (NLM).”

Revolting Gays: new website documents the South London Gay Community Centre and the Brixton gay squatting scene, 1970s – early1980s (Brixton Buzz)

Brixton Buzz (no relation): Revolting Gays: new website documents the South London Gay Community Centre and the Brixton gay squatting scene, 1970s – early1980s. “Telling the story of the South London Gay Community Centre and the Brixton gay squatting community from the 1970s to the early 1980s, the website documents a seemingly disparate group of gay men and their attempts to live together communally. Containing written text, photographs, podcasts, videos and art works, the Revolting Gays website will go live on June 24th this year.”

Fader: Creem returns with digital archive and new editorial staff

Fader: Creem returns with digital archive and new editorial staff . “Creem, a ’70s and ’80s rock rag that rivaled Rolling Stone in its heyday, has announced its relaunch as a digital publication, newsletter (‘Fresh Cream’), and quarterly print magazine. Its site will also feature a digitized version of every back issue from Creem‘s initial 20-year run, available to peruse with a 30-day free trial until August, at which point it will be bundled with subscriptions to the print quarterly.”

World’s Largest Computing Society Makes Thousands of Research Articles Freely Available; Opens First 50 Years Backfile (Association for Computing Machinery)

This launched in early April, and where was I? Off somewhere eating bon-bons, apparently. Anyway, from ACM: World’s Largest Computing Society Makes Thousands of Research Articles Freely Available; Opens First 50 Years Backfile. “ACM, the Association for Computing Machinery, today announced that its first 50 years of publications, from 1951 through the end of 2000, are now open and freely available to view and download via the ACM Digital Library. ACM’s first 50 years backfile contains more than 117,500 articles on a wide range of computing topics. In addition to articles published between 1951 and 2000, ACM has also opened related and supplemental materials including data sets, software, slides, audio recordings, and videos.”

Pitchfork: The Syrian Cassette Archives Explore a Pivotal Era of Middle Eastern Music

Pitchfork: The Syrian Cassette Archives Explore a Pivotal Era of Middle Eastern Music. “In February, he launched the website for the Syrian Cassette Archives, a multimedia project that focuses on a vibrant cassette culture that flourished in Syria from the 1970s to the 2000s. Since founding the project in 2018, [Mark] Gergis and a small group of collaborators have spent countless hours digitizing his collection of around 400 tapes. He’s also amassed new acquisitions of tapes and conducted interviews with artists and tape sellers from Syria.”

New York Times: Hidden in a Fire Island House, the Soundtrack of Love and Loss

New York Times: Hidden in a Fire Island House, the Soundtrack of Love and Loss. “The tapes, which were accumulated from 1979 to 1999, capture the sonic evolution of disco into more modern house music — often on the very same night. More than a catalog, the tapes are the soundtrack to a critical juncture in gay history as the AIDS crisis emerged and a new generation of activists fought for their rights and survival.”

KCRW: SF disco is the sound of gay liberation. Historic reels go digital

New-to-me, from KCRW: SF disco is the sound of gay liberation. Historic reels go digital. “The SF Disco Preservation Society touts more than 2,000 records from when disco was the soundtrack of gay liberation, with queer men flocking to San Francisco, LA, and New York to dance, sing, and mingle. The archive is run singlehandedly by Jim Hopkins, who became a DJ at age 16 in 1981. He notes that many DJs in SF died of AIDS, and he wanted to preserve their legacies.” The archive is a Soundcloud collection of over 275 DJ sets of disco music. Most is from the 1970s or early 1980s, but there are few from the mid-90s.

Coconuts Manila: Non-profit launches digital library of Marcos-era independent publications to fight historical disinformation

Coconuts Manila: Non-profit launches digital library of Marcos-era independent publications to fight historical disinformation. “In order to combat the disinformation networks that are working hard to rewrite the Philippines’ history, the non-profit organization Bantayog ng mga Bayani (Monument to the Heroes) has launched a digital library that features an archive of independent and alternative publications that were in circulation during the years that President Ferdinand Marcos kept the country under martial law.”

Column: Gen X TikTok is recycling the culture of the late Cold War, and what’s old is new again (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles: Column: Gen X TikTok is recycling the culture of the late Cold War, and what’s old is new again. “As Russia’s invasion of Ukraine passed the month mark, and reports emerge that Russia’s nuclear forces have been placed on high alert, the culture of the late Cold War has made a swinging comeback. Think of it as Cultural Cold War 2.0, with Russia as stand-in for the former Soviet Union.”

Leighton Buzzard Observer: Relive some wonderful Stewkley memories as fascinating film archive goes online

Leighton Buzzard Observer: Relive some wonderful Stewkley memories as fascinating film archive goes online . “The YouTube portal is divided into sections. One of them, May Day 1959-96, includes sound films of 18 years of the annual event held at the village school, the first film being that of 1967. Other sections include: Ten Years Ago, Saving Stewkley (Airport Campaign), Fun & Games, Special Events, Village Hall, Church & Chapel, TV Programmes and Presentations and the Best of the Rest. A Featured Footage section changes regularly.” Stewkley is in Buckinghamshire, in southeast England.

Oprah Daily: The Black Beauty Archives Are Preserving an Important Piece of Black History

New-to-me, from Oprah Daily: The Black Beauty Archives Are Preserving an Important Piece of Black History. “The Black Beauty Archives is a digital and physical library of vintage beauty products, media, recorded oral histories, transcribed beauty rituals, and images of, by, or for Black women from the 1950s to the present. ‘This is the beginning of a snowball effect that will transform how Black beauty is not only documented and preserved but discussed with nuance from a scholarly perspective,’ says makeup artist and makeup historian Michela Wariebi, who serves as beauty historian of the Black Beauty Archives. “

The Skinny: Scottish clubbers’ favourite dancefloor moments

New-to-me, from The Skinny: Scottish clubbers’ favourite dancefloor moments. “Featuring input from the promoters behind some of Scotland’s most famous parties from the 80s to the present day – including Subculture’s Harri & Domenic, Optimo’s JD Twitch, and trailblazing audiovisual DJ VAJ.Power – the archive provides a brief overview of Scotland’s vibrant club scene. But club culture is and always will be about the dancers, so we’ve picked out some of the recent submissions to the archive from members of the public to share some of the clubbers’ memories from the dancefloor.”

Baltimore Sun: UMBC students archive Highlandtown’s Latino immigration history and food culture

Baltimore Sun: UMBC students archive Highlandtown’s Latino immigration history and food culture. “Thirteen students from University of Maryland, Baltimore County, are working to fill a gap in history with the Highlandtown Immigration and Food Project. Through archival research and panel discussions with nonprofit groups’ leaders and business owners, the students created a timeline of Latino politics, history and food culture in Southeast Baltimore neighborhood from the 1980s to the 1990s.”