Case Western Reserve University: Case Western Reserve University Student Newspapers Now Online

Case Western Reserve University: Case Western Reserve University Student Newspapers Now Online. “The Special Collections and Archives team at Kelvin Smith Library has digitized over 150 years of Case Western Reserve University student newspapers dating back to 1862. The collection totals over 6,263 issues and is comprised of 55,769 pages and 314,236 articles.” This collection also covers nine different titles.

The Journey of Us: Celebrating Black History’s movers and changemakers (Google Blog)

Google Blog: The Journey of Us: Celebrating Black History’s movers and changemakers. “…we’ll spend Black History Month celebrating people from past and present who drive change, starting with a new collection of documents about Sojourner Truth in Google Arts and Culture. By telling these stories, we hope to inspire even more people to start their own journeys. Sojourner Truth changed her reality in a way that inspires us to do the same: to continue on our journey towards a more diverse and inclusive Google. Our consumers, our products, and our values demand it.”

Launched Last Fall and I Missed It: The Becker Collection

A press release from Boston College hipped me to a resource that launched last year but I had not heard about: The Becker Collection. From the front page: “The Becker Archive contains approximately 650 hitherto unexhibited and undocumented drawings by Joseph Becker and his colleagues, nineteenth-century artists who worked as artist-reporters for Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Weekly observing, drawing, and sending back for publication images of the Civil War, the construction of the railroads, the laying of the transatlantic cable in Ireland, the Chinese in the West, the Indian wars, the Chicago fire, and numerous other aspects of nineteenth-century American culture. These ‘first-hand’ drawings, most of which were never published, document in lively and specific ways key developments in the history of America as it struggled to establish its national identity.”

Digital Library of Georgia: Georgia antebellum newspapers now freely available online

Digital Library of Georgia: Georgia antebellum newspapers now freely available online. “As part of a $14,495 grant from the R. J. Taylor, Jr. Foundation, the Digital Library of Georgia has digitized approximately 53,930 pages of Georgia newspaper titles published prior to 1861 from microfilm held by the Georgia Newspaper Project.”

Daily Echo: Dorset County Asylum project gets grant

Daily Echo: Dorset County Asylum project gets grant. “The asylum, which was originally founded in 1832, was based at Forston House in Charminster, near Dorchester. By the 1860s, this facility was too small and the new asylum at the Herrison site was opened in 1863. Herrison House itself (pictured) was opened in 1904, and in 1940 the institution became known as Herrison Hospital. The archive, which dates back to 1832, consists of 300 boxes of material, including thousands of poignant individual patient records, as well as a wide range of other material – from building plans to the hospital’s farm, and even social activities such as the rounders society.” The institution closed in 1992.

New York Academy of Medicine: Digitizing the William S. Ladd Collection of Prints

New York Academy of Medicine: Digitizing the William S. Ladd Collection of Prints. “We are excited to launch a new digital collection: the William S. Ladd Collection of Prints! In 1975, The New York Academy of Medicine accepted the gift of the William S. Ladd collection, which consisted of 671 prints dating from the 17th – 19th centuries, from Cornell University Medical College via Erich Meyerhoff, then Librarian of the Medical College Library. Since receiving the Ladd Collection, the Library rehoused and conserved the material.”

Hyperallergic: A New Illustrated Database for Women Artists Spans the 15th to 19th Centuries

Hyperallergic: A New Illustrated Database for Women Artists Spans the 15th to 19th Centuries. “‘A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction,’ Virginia Woolf famously said from a college lecture podium in 1928, in what later evolved into a major feminist book. Surely, those two amenities would facilitate the career of many a woman visual artist, too. But even the privileged combination of financial independence and a studio (plus talent, of course) hasn’t been enough to secure many female creatives a place in the pantheon of art history.”