PRNewswire: Accessible Archives® Releases New Collection Invention and Technology in America: American Inventor, 1878-1887 (PRESS RELEASE)

PRNewswire: Accessible Archives® Releases New Collection Invention and Technology in America: American Inventor, 1878-1887 (PRESS RELEASE). “Accessible Archives, Inc., a digital publisher of full-text primary source historical collections, announces the release of a new primary source collection – Invention and Technology in America: American Inventor, Part I: 1878-1882 and Part II: 1883-1887. Invention And Technology In America: American Inventor provides an exclusive opportunity to investigate the history of American invention and the interaction of technology with social, economic, and cultural change throughout the course of the late 19th and early 20th century.”

Today’s Wills & Probate: Archaeologists to digitise burial records following HS2 excavation

Today’s Wills & Probate: Archaeologists to digitise burial records following HS2 excavation. “Archaeologists working on the HS2 rail link are looking for volunteers to help digitise the burial records of 57,639 Londoners who lived in the city in the 18th and 19th century. The information relates to St James’s Burial Ground near Euston station, where more than 31,000 burials were excavated as part of HS2’s archaeology work between 2018 and 2019.”

Smithsonian: Smithsonian American Art Museum Acquires Extraordinary Early Photography Collection From Larry J. West

Smithsonian: Smithsonian American Art Museum Acquires Extraordinary Early Photography Collection From Larry J. West. “The L.J. West Collection includes 286 objects from the 1840s to about 1925 in three groupings: works by early African American daguerreotypists James P. Ball, Glenalvin Goodridge and Augustus Washington; early photographs of diverse portrait subjects and objects related to abolitionists, the Underground Railroad and the role of women entrepreneurs in it; and photographic jewelry that represents the bridge between miniature painting and early cased photography such as daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes.”

The Current (UC Santa Barbara): Windows on the Past

The Current (UC Santa Barbara): Windows on the Past. “The Gazette was the city’s first newspaper, and published weekly until May 15, 1857. And now all 104 editions of the paper are open to the public. The UC Santa Barbara Library has digitized the Gazette, with issues available through its Alexandria Digital Research Library(link is external).”

Oireachtas Library: Oireachtas Library presents new digitised collection at American Conference for Irish Studies

Peter H. took time out of his busy day to let me know about this newspaper collection and I sure do appreciate it! Oireachtas Library: Oireachtas Library presents new digitised collection at American Conference for Irish Studies. “Kate McCarthy, the special collections librarian, gave a presentation to the conference on the Oireachtas Library’s digital special collections with a focus on the The United Irishman, the newspaper published by Jeremiah O’Donovan Rossa in New York in the late 19th century. The newspapers are part of the library’s Dublin Castle collection.”

Brigham Young University: Curious about Utah’s frontier women? Browse BYU’s new database of women’s newspaper ads

Brigham Young University: Curious about Utah’s frontier women? Browse BYU’s new database of women’s newspaper ads . “A single bottle of tonic to cure diabetes, cancer, ulcers and dizziness. Raisins and currants for Christmas mince meat pies. Midwifery courses taught by a certified female doctor, $30 a term. A souvenir stone from the Hill Cumorah, ‘guaranteed genuine,’ mailed from New York for 25 cents. This list represents just a sampling of the goods and services advertised to Utah frontier women in the Woman’s Exponent, the preeminent woman’s newspaper published in Salt Lake City from 1872 to 1914 to share local and general news, household tips and educational materials.”

Agenda Georgia: Illustrations of people and places of 19th century Caucasus now in National Archives of Georgia digital collection

Agenda Georgia: Illustrations of people and places of 19th century Caucasus now in National Archives of Georgia digital collection. “A series of 19th century illustrations of people and places of the South Caucasus, published in a French magazine around 150 years ago, can now be viewed by those interested in history and ethnography on the website of the National Archives of Georgia. Presenting city-dwellers and countryside folks of different ethnicities who lived and worked in cities, towns and villages, the works show Georgia and the wider region as it appeared to ethnographers and travellers between the 1840s and 1870s.”

Qatar National Library: Qatar Digital Library Sheds Light on the First Communications Revolution in the Gulf

Qatar National Library: Qatar Digital Library Sheds Light on the First Communications Revolution in the Gulf. “…in the 1860s, Britain sought to build a commercial telegraph line all the way to its most important colony, British India. As a result, the Gulf became one of the most important communication corridors of the British Empire. A series of historical documents held by the British Library and now available on the QDL reveal how the proposal to extend Britain’s telegraph line through the Gulf was first made in May 1860. That month, John Wortley de la More, an entrepreneur in the telegraph industry, outlined his plans to extend the existing lines further through Persia and the Gulf by establishing a link first from Baghdad to Basra, and then from Basra to Karachi, British India’s westernmost port (in modern-day Pakistan).”

Adam Matthew Digital announces publication of ‘Nineteenth Century Literary Society: The John Murray Publishing Archive’ (Adam Matthew)

Adam Matthew: Adam Matthew Digital announces publication of ‘Nineteenth Century Literary Society: The John Murray Publishing Archive’. “Drawn from the holdings of the National Library of Scotland, AM Digital’s latest collection, Nineteenth Century Literary Society: The John Murray Publishing Archive is an unparalleled resource for scholars and academics interested in the history of the book, literature and nineteenth-century history. From its inception in 1768, the John Murray publishing house worked with influential authors whose famed titles continue to shape literature to this day, including Jane Austen, Sir Walter Scott, Herman Melville and Lord Byron.” If you’re not familiar with Adam Matthew, I’ll let you know it’s not free.