KCUR: All Of Missouri Painter George Caleb Bingham’s Work Will Soon Be Free To The World Online

KCUR: All Of Missouri Painter George Caleb Bingham’s Work Will Soon Be Free To The World Online. “Missouri painter George Caleb Bingham shaped the way the nation saw life on the frontier. His work spanned politics, civil war discord and rowdy riverboatmen, and his genre paintings of 19th century river life are in many major national art collections. Within the next three years, all of Bingham’s nearly 600 known paintings will be accessible online and freely available to the public.”

The Conversation: How tattoos became fashionable in Victorian England

The Conversation: How tattoos became fashionable in Victorian England. “…we carried out the largest analysis of tattoos ever undertaken, examining 75,688 descriptions of tattoos, on 57,990 convicts in Britain and Australia from 1793 to 1925. We used data-mining techniques to extract information embedded within broader descriptive fields of criminal records, and we linked this information with extensive evidence about the personal characteristics and backgrounds of our subjects. Because the meanings of tattoos are often so difficult to fathom, we used visualisations to identify patterns of use and juxtapositions of particular designs.” This new database of tattoos is one of the new datasets from Digital Panopticon. There’s another new feature that lets you search convicts by occupation.

Digital Library of Georgia: Georgia Civil War and Reconstruction newspapers now freely available online

Digital Library of Georgia: Georgia Civil War and Reconstruction newspapers now freely available online . “As part of a $27,405.00 grant from the R. J. Taylor, Jr. Foundation, the Digital Library of Georgia has digitized over 100,000 pages of Georgia newspaper titles published from 1861 to 1877 from microfilm held by the Georgia Newspaper Project.”

National Tribune: Queenslands lost hi 1800s Indigenous police database launched at museum

National Tribune: Queenslands lost hi 1800s Indigenous police database launched at museum. Not sure what’s going on with the headline. “The archive – the Frontier Conflict and the Native Mounted Police in Queensland Database – is the result of a four-year project funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) and undertaken by University of Southern Queensland (USQ), Flinders University, The University of Notre Dame, James Cook University and Northern Archaeology Consultancies. It was launched at Queensland Museum yesterday (December 9) and includes more than 11,000 documents about 200 Native Mounted Police camps, 12,000 artefacts, 400 officers, 850 troopers and 1800 frontier conflict events across Queensland through the 19th century.”

State Archives of North Carolina: Early Newspapers Added to DigitalNC

State Archives of North Carolina: Early Newspapers Added to DigitalNC. “In 2009, the North Carolina Digitization Project allowed the State Archives to digitize newspapers that were, up until that time, only available on microfilm. Made possible by a LSTA grant provided by the State Library of North Carolina, it included papers dating from 1752-1890s from cities like Edenton (1787-1801), Fayetteville (1789-1795), Hillsboro (1786), New Bern (1751-1804), Salisbury (1799-1898), and Wilmington (1765-1816).”

RTL News: Digital slave registers Suriname are ‘warning against slavery’

From RTL News, and translated from Dutch by Google Translate: Digital slave registers Suriname are ‘warning against slavery’. “It took two years, but tomorrow is finally there: the Surinamese slave registers have been fully digitized. The records contain about eighty thousand names of slave owners and people who lived in slavery in Suriname between 1826 and 1863, as well as information about the birth, death, sale and release of slaves.” I didn’t recall hearing about Suriname, so I looked it up and fell smack down a rabbit hole.

Ars Technica: Scientists unlock the chemical secrets of a 19th-century photography technique

Ars Technica: Scientists unlock the chemical secrets of a 19th-century photography technique. “Mordançage is a photographic process that yields striking black-and-white photographs characterized by ghostly veiling effects. Scientists from George Mason University have recently figured out precisely what is happening chemically during the process, according to a recent paper in Analytical Chemistry.”