Manchester Arena attack: Tributes preserved online (BBC News)

BBC News: Manchester Arena attack: Tributes preserved online. “Thousands of items left as tributes to the Manchester Arena attack victims are to be recorded in a digital archive. The archive will document 10,000 objects – including soft toys, lanterns and a guitar – held at Manchester Art Gallery which were left across the city after bomb attack on 22 May 2017.”

Rice University: Rice U.’s new Harvey Memories Project preserves digital artifacts of the ‘first social media storm’

Rice University: Rice U.’s new Harvey Memories Project preserves digital artifacts of the ‘first social media storm’. I mentioned this last April but it looks like now it’s up and running. “The Harvey Memories Project is one of several projects awarded funding by the Rice Houston Engagement and Recovery Effort last year. The goal of the project is to build an open-access digital repository to collect, preserve and publish community-contributed memories of the storm in multiple formats, including photos of storm preparations and cleanup, audio and video recordings of the storm in progress, survivors’ narratives and even art.”

Mashable: Google search data shows just how horrible the year 2017 really was

Mashable: Google search data shows just how horrible the year 2017 really was. “2017 was a very bad year, and Google’s here to remind us of that. The tech giant released a list and ‘Year in Search 2017’ video detailing all of 2017’s highest-trending searches, which, as you may have guessed are all fairly grim.”

University of Oregon: Ethnic Studies archival team releases digital archive on Puerto Rico

University of Oregon: Ethnic Studies archival team releases digital archive on Puerto Rico. “Over the next eleven months, visit us regularly for new interviews, bibliographies, stories, photographic journeys, and more educational materials pertinent to Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria. Co-create knowledge with us! Share stories with us through our UO Puerto Rico Project Facebook Page [3], our UO Puerto Rico Project Twitter, [4] our hashtag #uoprproject, and our UO Puerto Rico Project YouTube Channel. [5]”

WBUR: You Can Now See The Posters From Boston’s Women’s March Online

WBUR: You Can Now See The Posters From Boston’s Women’s March Online . This is the 2017 march, not the 2018 march. “Ever wonder what happened to the signs from the Women’s March in Boston last year? With the help of Northeastern University, a team of scholars, students and volunteers created an online archive of more than 6,000 posters and pieces of artwork from the Jan. 21, 2017 protest.”

Mapping Our Memories: A Digitized Archive of Place and Loss in Sonoma County, California (Smithsonian Folklife)

Smithsonian Folklife: Mapping Our Memories: A Digitized Archive of Place and Loss in Sonoma County, California. “A previous neighbor asked if I knew anything about the house he had grown up in and loved. It didn’t survive the fire, but I realized I had family photos of his house in the mid-1990s. An idea dawned on me: what if there was a central place for Sonoma County residents to upload their own family photos of places that were destroyed? A virtual map allowing people to click through and see collective memories. Here is the result: Sonoma County Fires Community Memory Map. I built this interactive platform so that anyone can upload photographs to the map. The pictures must be linked to a specific address and have a brief caption. The intention is to create a patchwork of community memories of spaces that are no longer there.”

PopSugar: The Top 10 YouTube Videos of 2017

PopSugar: The Top 10 YouTube Videos of 2017. “Every year, YouTube releases a list of the top trending videos from across the platform. The reason why I love it so much? It doesn’t just capture the obvious moments of the year that was; instead, it shows the things that people around the world loved so much that they couldn’t help but watch again, things we may have never known about, things that transcend the current events and popular culture that we know oh so well. In 2017, the list was no exception.”