BBC: Spotify reveals 2020’s most-streamed songs

BBC: Spotify reveals 2020’s most-streamed songs. “Drake, Bad Bunny, Dua Lipa and The Weeknd are among the most-streamed artists of 2020, according to figures from Spotify. Drake was the most popular artist in the UK, reclaiming the number one position from Ed Sheeran. The Weeknd’s Blinding Lights was the most-played song in the UK, while Lewis Capaldi’s Divinely Uninspired To A Hellish Extent was the top album.”

New York Times: Smithsonian Archives of American Art Gathers an Oral History of 2020

New York Times: Smithsonian Archives of American Art Gathers an Oral History of 2020. “As the pandemic set in this spring, the historians and curators at the Smithsonian Archives of American Art began doing what they do best: looking through relics of history. They found little information related to the 1918 flu pandemic in their archives, and decided to make sure that future historians would have a lot more material about this time of the coronavirus. So a team at the Archives of American Art, led by Liza Kirwin, its interim director, set out to create a thorough record for posterity.”

CNET: The biggest tech fails of 2020

CNET: The biggest tech fails of 2020. “If there’s anything this year has taught us, it’s that we’re more divided than ever. Whether it’s fanboy arguments over Android versus iOS, Republicans versus Democrats, or shutdowns versus opening the economy, we seemingly can’t agree on anything. Well, except for one thing: 2020 is a dumpster fire that we all can’t wait to see in our rear view mirror. ”

CNET: Mysterious monolith puzzle has been solved by internet sleuths

CNET: Mysterious monolith puzzle has been solved by internet sleuths. “A few days ago the internet went wild at the discovery of a metallic monolith mysteriously standing in the middle of the Utah desert. Discovered by the Utah’s Department of Public Safety, the rumor mill quickly began churning. Was it aliens? Has 2001: A Space Odyssey been brought to life? Thanks to some particularly devoted Reddit users, we now know that the likelihood of it being anything extraterrestrial is slim (though if it was going to happen, I think we can all agree that 2020 would have been the year).”

The Guardian: Oxford Dictionaries: 2020 has too many Words of the Year to name just one

The Guardian: Oxford Dictionaries: 2020 has too many Words of the Year to name just one. “For the first time, the Oxford English Dictionary has chosen not to name a word of the year, describing 2020 as ‘a year which cannot be neatly accommodated in one single word’. Instead, from ‘unmute’ to ‘mail-in’, and from ‘coronavirus’ to ‘lockdown’, the eminent reference work has announced its ‘words of an “unprecedented” year’.”

ZDNet: Top 10 Tech Turkeys 2020: The worst products and services of the (worst) year

ZDNet: Top 10 Tech Turkeys 2020: The worst products and services of the (worst) year. “From COVID-19 to economic rollercoaster to election mayhem, 2020 is a year we’d all rather forget. But before we start looking ahead to a brighter and better 2021, and with Thanksgiving this week, it’s time for Jason Cipriani and me to hand out our annual Tech Turkey awards. That is, tech products and services that didn’t live up to their promise, overblown hype, or just flat out failed.”

It’s official: YouTube has canceled Rewind 2020 (The Next Web)

The Next Web: It’s official: YouTube has canceled Rewind 2020. “YouTube doesn’t want you to remember 2020. The Google subsidiary has announced it’s canceling 2020’s instalment of Rewind, its annual look back at the year’s most memorable moments. The decision marks the first time the company has decided to skip this ritual since its inception in 2010.”

New York Times: How 2020 Changed the Internet

New York Times: How 2020 Changed the Internet. “In this long (and still ongoing) election season in America, there are two things I have learned about the internet companies through which many of us experience the world. First, Facebook, Google and the rest have reluctantly embraced their role as our gatekeepers to information, and there’s likely no going back. Second, so much about how these gatekeepers exercise their power remains unknown to the rest of us.”

Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation: IPLC Launches the Belarusian Politics and Society Web Archive

Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation: IPLC Launches the Belarusian Politics and Society Web Archive. “Developed by librarians at Harvard and Stanford Universities, and the University of Chicago — under the auspices of the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation — the Belarusian Politics and Society Web Archive exists to preserve material related to the 2020 presidential election campaign in Belarus and the events that followed.”

Associated Press: The Summer of COVID-19 ends with health officials worried

Associated Press: The Summer of COVID-19 ends with health officials worried. “The U.S. had about 1.6 million confirmed COVID-19 cases around Memorial Day, before backyard parties and other gatherings contributed to a summertime surge. It now has more than 6.2 million cases, according to the count kept by Johns Hopkins University. Deaths from the virus more than doubled over the summer to nearly 190,000.”

Vox: Thursday’s historically bad economic growth numbers, explained

Vox: Thursday’s historically bad economic growth numbers, explained. “The US economy shrank at the fastest rate on record in the second quarter of 2020, according to data released Thursday morning by the Bureau of Economic Analys Labor Statistics. Quarterly GDP statistics are normally calculated in terms of a seasonally adjusted annualized rate, and when you do that, here’s what it looks like — a sharp drop from positive growth in 2019 to a more than 30 percent contraction in the most recent quarter.”

WashU Expert: How to document the protests (Washington University in St. Louis)

Washington University in St. Louis: WashU Expert: How to document the protests. “Americans across the nation are documenting today’s protests through photography and video, often posting their content on Instagram, Twitter and other social media feeds. But is that the safest way to preserve these historic images? No, said Miranda Rectenwald, curator of local history at University Libraries at Washington University in St. Louis. She has created a list of resources from Documenting the Now, the Blacktivists and more, to help protest participants preserve their content for the long term.”

Mashable: Best of the nice internet in 2020, so far

Mashable: Best of the nice internet in 2020, so far. “We’re officially halfway through 2020 and it’s, uh, not great, Bob! Between the global pandemic and the massive social unrest, many of us are left anxious without much to do but…stare at our screens and become more anxious. In addition to being a hellscape, the internet is — thankfully — also always home to some wholesomeness, no matter what’s going on IRL. Here’s some niceness that’ll keep you going throughout the rest of the year (well, hopefully):”

CNET: Memes toss first half of 2020 into the blazing dumpster where it belongs

CNET: Memes toss first half of 2020 into the blazing dumpster where it belongs. “Goodbye and good riddance, first six months of 2020. You were a dumpster fire of a half-year, with your global pandemic and your murder hornets, and the second half of the year better not be taking cues from you. July 2 marks the midpoint of most calendar years, since there are generally 182 days behind it and 182 days after it. (Since this is a leap year, there are 183 days behind us now.) As we turn the cursed calendar page to July, the internet was quick to try to find some laughs in the debacle that was January through June, and to envision what July through December might have in store for an already exhausted world.”