Pew: Charting Congress on Social Media in the 2016 and 2020 Elections

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): Charting Congress on Social Media in the 2016 and 2020 Elections. “The 2020 election occurred in a cultural and political climate that was vastly different than that of the 2016 race. The unique nature of each election cycle was also visible in the ways members of Congress used Facebook and Twitter to engage with the public in the months before and after election day. Most obviously, the 2020 election was much more online than the preceding presidential cycle. Lawmakers shared tens of thousands more posts – and received orders of magnitude more engagement from other social media users – than was the case in 2016.”

In the Streets; On the Walls: Archiving, Activism, & the Urban Art Mapping Street Art Database (Western Michigan University)

Western Michigan University: In the Streets; On the Walls: Archiving, Activism, & the Urban Art Mapping Street Art Database. “The Urban Art Mapping George Floyd and Anti-Racist Street Art database is a crowdsourced, activist archive of street art created in the context of the ongoing movement demanding social justice and equality…. Join guest scholars Heather Shirey and David Todd Lawrence, co-directors of Urban Art Mapping Research Project, and learn about the ways that artists and writers have used walls, posts, streets and boards as sites for vernacular communicative acts and explore the goals, challenges and applications of a crowd-sourced archive of protest art in the community.” September 15th, Webex, free.

FBI: FBI Releases 2020 Hate Crime Statistics

FBI: FBI Releases 2020 Hate Crime Statistics. “Today the FBI released Hate Crime Statistics, 2020, the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program’s latest compilation about bias-motivated incidents throughout the nation. The 2020 data, submitted by 15,136 law enforcement agencies, provide information about the offenses, victims, offenders, and locations of hate crimes.”

The Register: Paperless office? 2.8 trillion pages printed in 2020, down by 14% or 450 billion sheets

The Register: Paperless office? 2.8 trillion pages printed in 2020, down by 14% or 450 billion sheets . “Around 450 billion fewer pages were printed from home and office devices in 2020 as COVID-19 disrupted the world of work. The direction of travel has been obvious in recent times: people were printing less even before the pandemic took hold, but the decline was sharper last year as volumes plunged 14 per cent on 2019 levels to a total of 2.8 trillion pages, according to IDC.”

Al-Fanar Media: One Year After the Beirut Blast, Technology Keeps Memories Fresh

Al-Fanar Media: One Year After the Beirut Blast, Technology Keeps Memories Fresh. “On August 4, 2020, at 6:08 p.m., time stood still in Beirut as the city’s port erupted in an explosion that killed hundreds of people and injured thousands more. Though it has been a year since the blast happened, to many of Beirut’s residents, it feels like yesterday. Memories of this day remain crystal clear, thanks in part to digital technology. The devastating blast was preceded by a smaller explosion and fire in a warehouse, and people already had their mobile-phone cameras trained on the port when the second, colossal explosion occurred. Thus, they were able to document the blast as it happened, as well as its aftermath.”

Mother Jones: Researchers Say They’ve Uncovered a Massive Facebook Bot Farm from the 2020 Election

Mother Jones: Researchers Say They’ve Uncovered a Massive Facebook Bot Farm from the 2020 Election. “A group of security researchers say they’ve unmasked a massive bot farm that aimed to shape public opinion on Facebook during the heat of the 2020 presidential election. According to Paul Bischoff of Comparitech, a British cybersecurity company, the network includes 13,775 unique Facebook accounts that each posted roughly 15 times per month, for an output of more than 50,000 posts a week.”

TNW: 60% of the world is online — 10 big takeaways on the state of the internet in 2021

TNW: 60% of the world is online — 10 big takeaways on the state of the internet in 2021. “The new Digital 2021 April Global Statshot Report – published in partnership between Hootsuite and We Are Social – reveals that more than 6 in 10 people on Earth now use the internet. Internet users have grown by more than 330 million over the past year, reaching a total of more than 4.7 billion at the start of April 2021.”

#Election2020: the first public Twitter dataset on the 2020 US Presidential election (PubMed)

PubMed: #Election2020: the first public Twitter dataset on the 2020 US Presidential election. “The study of online chatter is paramount, especially in the wake of important voting events like the recent November 3, 2020 U.S. Presidential election and the inauguration on January 21, 2021. Limited access to social media data is often the primary obstacle that limits our abilities to study and understand online political discourse. To mitigate this impediment and empower the Computational Social Science research community, we are publicly releasing a massive-scale, longitudinal dataset of U.S. politics- and election-related tweets. This multilingual dataset encompasses over 1.2 billion tweets and tracks all salient U.S. political trends, actors, and events from 2019 to the time of this writing.”

Publishers Weekly: ALA Releases 2020 Most Challenged Books List

Publishers Weekly: ALA Releases 2020 Most Challenged Books List. “For a third year in a row, Alex Gino’s George has topped the American Library Association’s list of most challenged book in American libraries. The ALA’s Most Challenged Books list, released annually in conjunction with National Library Week, which runs April 4-10 this year, tracks attempts to ban or restrict access to books across the United States and raises awareness of censorship efforts in our libraries and schools.”

FBI: FBI Releases the Internet Crime Complaint Center 2020 Internet Crime Report, Including COVID-19 Scam Statistics

FBI: FBI Releases the Internet Crime Complaint Center 2020 Internet Crime Report, Including COVID-19 Scam Statistics. “The 2020 Internet Crime Report includes information from 791,790 complaints of suspected internet crime—an increase of more than 300,000 complaints from 2019—and reported losses exceeding $4.2 billion. State-specific statistics have also been released and can be found within the 2020 Internet Crime Report and in the accompanying 2020 State Reports.”

Poynter: Looking back at a year that changed everything

Poynter: Looking back at a year that changed everything. “Certainly, a year ago, we were generally aware of the potential of stormy clouds on the horizon. But many had no idea of what was truly ahead. Predictions that we would all return to normal by July or August 2020 were wildly optimistic and not even close to realistic. They now seem almost childish in their wishful thinking. Fast-forward to today and July or August 2021 might be a little too hopeful. And, of course, worst of all, we could not fathom that more than half a million people in the U.S. would die.”

PR Newswire: Dictionary. com Announces New Words Relating to Covid, Social Justice, and More (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Dictionary.com Announces New Words Relating to Covid, Social Justice, and More (PRESS RELEASE). “Dictionary.com today announced its latest addition of new words, which reflects the ongoing impact of COVID-19 on language and hits on a variety of additional themes relating to race, social justice, identity, and culture. The leading online dictionary has updated 7,600 entries, including 450 new entries and 94 new definitions in existing entries.”

Mashable: How Facebook, Twitter, YouTube reacted to big events in 2020, including Trump’s many lies

Mashable: How Facebook, Twitter, YouTube reacted to big events in 2020, including Trump’s many lies. “The Mozilla Foundation, a nonprofit which advocates for a secure, open internet that supports democracy, has released an interactive timeline that shows the misinformation policy changes online platforms made before, during, and after the 2020 election, and how those actions intersect with major political and cultural events that spurred misinformation. Mozilla is most widely known for its Firefox browser, but the nonprofit also tracks online misinformation in an effort to improve tech policies.”

Engadget: Streaming music made up 83 percent of the record industry’s revenue in 2020

Engadget: Streaming music made up 83 percent of the record industry’s revenue in 2020. “The coronavirus pandemic may have made it nearly impossible to check out live shows last year, but the music industry still found a way to grow despite all the hardships. According to the Recording Industry Association of America’s annual year-end report, overall recorded music revenue increased by 9.2 percent to $12.2 billion in 2020. That growth was primarily sustained by more money coming from streaming services, with the format generating $10.1 billion in revenue in 2020, up from $8.9 billion in 2019. 2020 marked the fifth consecutive year of growth on that front.”

Rutgers-Camden News Now: New Jersey Residents Had a Rollercoaster 2020, Says New Study on Twitter Messages

Rutgers-Camden News Now: New Jersey Residents Had a Rollercoaster 2020, Says New Study on Twitter Messages. “For Rutgers University–Camden researchers, the messages are clear: 2020 was quite the emotional rollercoaster in New Jersey. Over the past year, Dan Hart, a professor of childhood studies and psychology, and a senior vice chancellor; Sarah Allred, an associate professor of psychology; and Tory Mascuilli, a graduate psychology student, have tracked the emotional highs and lows of New Jersey’s counties by coding the content of residents’ Twitter messages.”