Mummy returns: Voice of 3,000-year-old Egyptian priest brought to life (BBC)

BBC: Mummy returns: Voice of 3,000-year-old Egyptian priest brought to life. “When Nesyamun died, his voice fell silent, but 3,000 years on, a team of researchers have brought it back to life. They have done so by producing a 3D-printed voice box based Nesyamun’s vocal tract, which was scanned to establish its precise dimensions. By using the vocal tract with an artificial larynx sound, they synthesised a vowel sound meant to be similar to the voice of Nesyamun.”

Library of Congress: Library’s Collections Come to Life as 3D Models

Library of Congress: Library’s Collections Come to Life as 3D Models. “The 3D Digital Modeling, Imaging, and Printing Working Group was created to explore the use of 3D technologies to expand access to the Library’s collections. In Fall 2019, the working group launched a pilot in which a limited selection of items from the online collections were 3D scanned and the 3D models made publicly available. In the blog post below, I share what it was like to be trained to build 3D models alongside other Library staff, how we collaborated as a cross-functional working group, and lay out the potential uses of the models we created as part of the LOC 3D pilot project.”

KMSP: St. Thomas students develop scanner to create digital archive of tactile images for the blind

KMSP: St. Thomas students develop scanner to create digital archive of tactile images for the blind. “Engineering students from the University of St. Thomas unveiled a scanner they developed to better preserve tactile images created for the blind. When the Minnesota State Services for the Blind transcribes school textbooks into braille, images in textbooks are turned into tactile diagrams, so that a vision impaired reader can feel the image.”

Engadget: NIST preserve JFK assassination bullets with 3D scans (updated)

Engadget: NIST preserve JFK assassination bullets with 3D scans (updated). “The 56th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination was last month. Early next year, you’ll be able to see, in almost nauseating detail, the bullets that took his life. The National Archives will upload high-definition 3D images of the projectiles to its online catalog.”

Reason: A German Museum Tried To Hide This Stunning 3D Scan of an Iconic Egyptian Artifact. Today You Can See It for the First Time

Reason: A German Museum Tried To Hide This Stunning 3D Scan of an Iconic Egyptian Artifact. Today You Can See It for the First Time. “In Berlin, the state-funded Egyptian Museum and Papyrus Collection has a high-quality, full-color 3D scan of the most iconic portrait sculpture ever produced, the 3,364-year-old Bust of Nefertiti. It has held this artifact since 1920, just a few years after its discovery in Amarna, Egypt; Egypt has been demanding its repatriation ever since it first went on display. The bust is one of the most copied works of ancient Egyptian art, and has become a cultural symbol of Berlin. For reasons the museum has difficulty explaining, this scan too is off-limits to the public. Rather, it was off-limits. I was able to obtain it after a 3-year-long freedom of information effort directed at the organization that oversees the museum.”

TechCrunch: Ubiquity6’s Display.land is part 3D scanner, part social network

TechCrunch: Ubiquity6’s Display.land is part 3D scanner, part social network. “The company’s first publicly launched app, Display.land, started rolling out on iOS and Android over the weekend. Part 3D scanner and part social network, it lets you scan a location or object, edit it (cropping it to just the bits you’re interested in, or adding pre-built digital objects), and share it with the world. Want everyone to see it? You can pin a scan to a map, allowing anyone panning by to explore your scan. Want to keep it to yourself? Flip the privacy toggle accordingly.”

Smithsonian: Neil Armstrong’s Spacesuit On Display at National Air and Space Museum for 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Smithsonian: Neil Armstrong’s Spacesuit On Display at National Air and Space Museum for 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11. “The effort to protect and display Armstrong’s suit also included sharing it with a wider audience. The museum and the Smithsonian’s Digitization Program Office 3-D scanned the suit, helmet and gloves. Through laser-arm scanning, structured light, photogrammetry and medical CT scanning, anyone in the world with an internet connection can now peek inside the suit and take a guided tour of its many complex components. The team has also made the data available so the public can download the high-resolution 3-D model for use in AR/VR platforms, animation software and 3-D printing. The scan data and a tour of the 3-D model are now available.”