Sydney Morning Herald: Rare Queensland-made braille globe to be replicated

Sydney Morning Herald: Rare Queensland-made braille globe to be replicated. “Richard Frank Tunley created the globe for vision-impaired people by installing metal plates on a wooden sphere that revealed landmasses by shape and with labels written in braille. The original globe is now very fragile but advancements in technology, including 3D printing and photogrammetry, along with a $10,000 of funding from the State Library of Queensland will allow it to be reproduced.”

Phys.org: Researchers create digital objects from incomplete 3-D data

Phys.org: Researchers create digital objects from incomplete 3-D data. “Using special cameras, it is now possible to capture real objects digitally. Nonetheless, they run into trouble if for example some parts are hidden by others. Computer scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Informatics, together with colleagues from the US semiconductor manufacturer Intel and the Intel Visual Computing Institute at Saarland University, have developed a method that can reconstruct a digital object even from incomplete images.”

Phys.org: New technique accurately digitizes transparent objects

Phys.org: New technique accurately digitizes transparent objects. “A new imaging technique makes it possible to precisely digitize clear objects and their surroundings, an achievement that has eluded current state-of-the-art 3D rendering methods. The ability to create detailed, 3D digital versions of real-world objects and scenes can be useful for movie production, creating virtual reality experiences, improving design or quality assurance in the production of clear products and even for preserving rare or culturally significant objects.”

Smithsonian: This Replica of a Tlingit Killer Whale Hat Is Spurring Dialogue About Digitization

Smithsonian: This Replica of a Tlingit Killer Whale Hat Is Spurring Dialogue About Digitization. “In all fairness, the 3D-milled replica of the original Killer Whale hat is a meticulously crafted feat of modern technology. Innovation, however, does not equate to the spiritual significance embodied by the real Kéet S’aaxw, and this differentiation is important: It’s why the Killer Whale hat (and its copy), the southeastern Alaska-based Dakl’aweidi clan and the Smithsonian Institution have become embroiled in the challenges of the ongoing issues surrounding repatriation, artifact digitization and cultural heritage.”

TechCrunch: Universities and museums join in effort to ‘scan all vertebrates’

TechCrunch: Universities and museums join in effort to ‘scan all vertebrates’. “It seems that even scientific endeavors fall victim to feature creep — or in the case of an effort to scan all fishes that has expanded to include all vertebrates, creature creep. More than a dozen learning institutions are pooling their resources to create detailed 3D scans, inside and out, of more than 20,000 animals.”

Digital Trends: The British Museum Publishes The First 3D Scan Of The Rosetta Stone Online

Digital Trends: The British Museum Publishes The First 3D Scan Of The Rosetta Stone Online. “You no longer have to visit the British Museum in London to see the Rosetta Stone in detail. Last week, the museum published the first 3D scan of the famous slab of hieroglyphics online at Sketchfab, where it’s accompanied by the website’s new sound support feature.”