Digital Trends: The British Museum Publishes The First 3D Scan Of The Rosetta Stone Online

Digital Trends: The British Museum Publishes The First 3D Scan Of The Rosetta Stone Online. “You no longer have to visit the British Museum in London to see the Rosetta Stone in detail. Last week, the museum published the first 3D scan of the famous slab of hieroglyphics online at Sketchfab, where it’s accompanied by the website’s new sound support feature.”

3Ders: Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site will let you 3D print artifacts for free

3Ders: Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site will let you 3D print artifacts for free. “A museum in Indianapolis is changing the digitization game: the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site, home of the 23rd U.S. president, is now allowing visitors to 3D print replicas of its artifacts for free. The unique service is part of the museum’s New Century eCollection project, which will oversee the digitization of the Site’s 10,000-piece collection, ranging from statues and ornaments to gifts to the late Harrison.”

Phys.org: 3-D scanning fossils to help researchers around the world study mastodons

Phys.org: 3-D scanning fossils to help researchers around the world study mastodons. “Boxes upon boxes filled with the fossilized remains of a mastodon that died in Virginia more than 18,000 years ago are being hauled up the steps to Virginia Commonwealth University’s Virtual Curation Laboratory, where the massive Ice Age animal’s fossils—including the tip of a tusk, a very worn tooth, toe bones, a rib bone and a mandible—are slated to be 3-D scanned.”

3Ders.org: 3D scanning allows Dundee’s D’Arcy Thompson Museum to share virtual zoological collection online

3Ders.org: 3D scanning allows Dundee’s D’Arcy Thompson Museum to share virtual zoological collection online. “The D’Arcy Thompson Museum at Scotland’s University of Dundee has created a library of 3D models documenting its zoological collection. CT scanners and handheld structured light scanners were used to turn the originals into digital files, and the collection been accessed from more than 25 countries.”

Mid-Pacific Institute: Student historians use immersive technology to preserve WWII icon

Mid-Pacific Institute: Student historians use immersive technology to preserve WWII icon . “In Lyssa Zawalski’s Historical Preservation class, high school students learn the intricacies of history by immersing themselves in projects that contribute to the preservation of valuable artifacts. On February 8, the class visited the Pacific Aviation Museum on Pearl Harbor’s Ford Island to scan the P-40 Warhawk.”

3D Bone Scans of Australopithecus “Lucy” Now Available Online

Lucy is over 3 million years old but she looks only 900,000 thanks to this one weird trick. Just kidding. Lucy is a famous collection of bone fossils of an Australopithecus, and earlier this week made 3D scans of some of her bones available. “The world’s most famous fossil is now open source. 3D scans of Lucy — a 3.18-million-year-old hominin found in Ethiopia — were released on 29 August, allowing anyone to examine her arm, shoulder and knee bones and even make their own 3D-printed copies. The scans accompany a Nature paper that argues that Lucy, a human relative belonging to the species Australopithecus afarensis, died after falling from a tree.”

Police Will Try to Unlock Dead Man’s Phone With 3D-Printed Fingers

Investigating a murder case? Can’t unlock the victim’s phone? Well, hey, maybe you can just 3D print his fingers. “[Anil] Jain and his PhD student Sunpreet Arora couldn’t share details of the case with me, since it’s an ongoing investigation, but the gist is this: a man was murdered, and the police think there might be clues to who murdered him stored in his phone. But they can’t get access to the phone without his fingerprint or passcode. So instead of asking the company that made the phone to grant them access, they’re going another route: having the Jain lab create a 3D printed replica of the victim’s fingers. With them, they hope to unlock the phone.”