Smithsonian: Neil Armstrong’s Spacesuit On Display at National Air and Space Museum for 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Smithsonian: Neil Armstrong’s Spacesuit On Display at National Air and Space Museum for 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11. “The effort to protect and display Armstrong’s suit also included sharing it with a wider audience. The museum and the Smithsonian’s Digitization Program Office 3-D scanned the suit, helmet and gloves. Through laser-arm scanning, structured light, photogrammetry and medical CT scanning, anyone in the world with an internet connection can now peek inside the suit and take a guided tour of its many complex components. The team has also made the data available so the public can download the high-resolution 3-D model for use in AR/VR platforms, animation software and 3-D printing. The scan data and a tour of the 3-D model are now available.”

Calgary Herald: U of L project creates detailed models of Blackfoot artifacts

Calgary Herald: U of L project creates detailed models of Blackfoot artifacts. “A group of University of Lethbridge researchers and Blackfoot elders will spend two weeks in England this summer to produce detailed models of Blackfoot artifacts. Christine Clark, one of the researchers embarking on the trip in July, said the artifacts will be documented through a process called photogrammetry, which involves taking a series of photos all the way around the object. Software will then be used to transform the images into a realistic 3-D model.”

China Focus: Digital technologies preserve cultural heritage in China (Xinhua)

Xinhua: China Focus: Digital technologies preserve cultural heritage in China. “Researchers are using 3D scanners to collect data about the size, color and structure of the Nanchan Temple on Wutai Mountain in northern China’s Shanxi Province. They plan to create a digital archive for the temple, which is the oldest extant wooden building from the Tang Dynasty (618-907) in China.”

DutchCulture: 3D scans of Dutch VOC ships uncover secrets from the past

This is from February but I missed it then. From DutchCulture: 3D scans of Dutch VOC ships uncover secrets from the past. VOC ships were apparently the Dutch East India Company ships. “In 2018 maritime archaeologist John McCarthy spent 10 weeks visiting European museums to 3D scan models of Dutch VOC ships dated to the 17th and 18th centuries.”

Heritage gets a tech upgrade: Digital archiving giving Gateway of India, Mysore Palace a new lease of life (Economic Times)

Economic Times (India): Heritage gets a tech upgrade: Digital archiving giving Gateway of India, Mysore Palace a new lease of life . “The 3D scan project for the Gateway of India shows how imaging technology is throwing open the portals of history. The advent of superior imaging technology has helped local bodies around the world archive and document monuments, thereby helping in their preservation. Recently, field work was underway at the Gateway of India.”

New Web Site Provides Digitized Models of Bird Bones

Read an article about this but it didn’t include the URL, so I’m going straight to the source to tell you about Fauna Toolkit: Bird Bones. From the home page: “A portal to 3D digitised models of bird bones from museum collections. 159 bones from 28 species in 22 families and 19 orders are now available from the Index below.”

The Daily Aztec: 3D Greek digital photographic library allows researches to piece together remnants of the past

The Daily Aztec: 3D Greek digital photographic library allows researches to piece together remnants of the past. “In a tech-savvy world, SDSU’s Classics department is adopting more innovative means in which students can take a look at ancient artifacts – without having to travel thousands of miles across the globe. ‘Some of the most important pieces are sherds … there’s one piece in New York, four pieces in Florence, two pieces in Paris in the Louvre,’ Dr. Danielle Bennett, a professor in the Humanities department said. ‘3D design is going to bring them all together in the digital library.'”