Virtual Volterra: Ancient Amphitheaters and Temples Recorded in 3D (LiveScience)

LiveScience: Virtual Volterra: Ancient Amphitheaters and Temples Recorded in 3D. “The mountaintop town of Volterra in central Italy witnessed the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. Now, researchers are using the latest reality capture technology and software to preserve a 3D digital record of its ancient temples, theaters and other buildings for the future, and to gain new insights into how they were made…. Elements of the reality-capture project, including 3D models of the Etruscan arch and a stone pedestal from Volterra’s Roman theater, are also available to the public at a new website…”

CNN: Meet the scientists immortalizing African heritage in virtual reality

This was on CNN at the beginning of January and I 100% missed it: Meet the scientists immortalizing African heritage in virtual reality. “The archaeological wonders of the world offer a rich window into the past. But many are crumbling, weed-laden and victim to vandalism and conflict. UNESCO World Heritage Sites, such as those in Libya and Mali, have been caught in the crossfire of regional disputes. Concerned with the decay of African heritage sites, The Zamani Project, based at the University of Cape Town, South Africa, is seeking to immortalize historic spots in three-dimensional, virtual reality-ready models.”

Reshaping The Experience Of Art: Digitization And 3D Archives (Digicult)

Digicult: Reshaping The Experience Of Art: Digitization And 3D Archives. “The destruction of world heritage sites and artworks in Mosul, Iraq, in February 2015, sparked a global movement to digitize and preserve important works and monuments. Institutions and individuals were called upon to create, refine and disseminate digital scans of the lost works of art…. This process is transforming where we experience Art, as every scanned object is now accessible regardless of location, wealth or ownership. Previously bound to cultural institutions, the digital archive is now easily obtainable to viewers and can be manipulated, collected, and modified free of decorum. In a way it transposes the museum into the computer, peels off all our preconceived behaviors toward the object while granting us new powers on the works by allowing us to interact with the files.”

Google Blog: The British Museum and Google Arts & Culture: Decoding the secrets of the ancient Maya

Google Blog: The British Museum and Google Arts & Culture: Decoding the secrets of the ancient Maya. “In the 19th century, the explorer Alfred Maudslay set out to capture and preserve the stories the Maya of Central America, one of the largest and most successful indigenous cultures in the world, with more than 2000 years of rich and vibrant history. For decades, he travelled through the region carrying tons of equipment on mule trains through the jungle and created the first glass plate photographs and plaster casts of some of the most important ancient Maya art from the region. More than 100 years later, Google Arts & Culture and the British Museum are picking up where Maudslay left off. Now, visitors from around the world can explore the Maya’s rich heritage online and learn about their achievements in art, architecture, astronomy, mathematics and language.”

MakeUseOf: The Best Websites to Order 3D Prints From

MakeUseOf: The Best Websites to Order 3D Prints From. “The 3D printing trend has lost a lot of its mainstream buzz, but that doesn’t mean it’s dead or dying. The industry continues to grow, evolve, and expose itself to new opportunities all the time. You can 3D print a lot of cool and clever stuff these days, and there’s no end in sight for this nifty new technology.”

Sydney Morning Herald: Rare Queensland-made braille globe to be replicated

Sydney Morning Herald: Rare Queensland-made braille globe to be replicated. “Richard Frank Tunley created the globe for vision-impaired people by installing metal plates on a wooden sphere that revealed landmasses by shape and with labels written in braille. The original globe is now very fragile but advancements in technology, including 3D printing and photogrammetry, along with a $10,000 of funding from the State Library of Queensland will allow it to be reproduced.”