Forbes: New Art Scanning Method Offers 3-D Image Of Painting’s Brush Strokes

Forbes: New Art Scanning Method Offers 3-D Image Of Painting’s Brush Strokes . “As tempting as it may be, you can’t touch a painting in a museum. And now that many museums are closed, you’re even further from seeing the close-up detail in brush strokes that can tell you so much about how the art was created. But now, a collaboration between artists and researchers at Penn State and the New Jersey Institute of Technology have come closer to developing a method that makes it possible to scan a sizeable section of a painting and turn it into a 3-D model that maintains the fine brush stroke pattern details.”

The Roanoke Star: 3D Imaging Expands Access to Rare Insect Collection

The Roanoke Star: 3D Imaging Expands Access to Rare Insect Collection. “The digital collection will include the digitized physical picture or 3D model of the insect and metadata including measurements, chemical compositions, ancient DNA information, and other biological or geographical information. This gives anyone with an Internet connection an opportunity to learn from the past and build on future policies and discoveries. Several scientifically valuable collections in the museum will be digitized, including specimens of federally endangered species and ecologically critical pollinators.”

Daily Camera: CU Boulder Museum of Natural History releases interactive 3D scan of triceratops skull fossil

Daily Camera: CU Boulder Museum of Natural History releases interactive 3D scan of triceratops skull fossil. “The University of Colorado Boulder’s Museum of Natural History recently released on the internet an interactive 3D scan of its triceratops skull, a fossil nearly the size of a small car.”

Eye on the Arctic: Archeologists create digital blueprints of historic sites on Canadian Arctic island

Eye on the Arctic: Archeologists create digital blueprints of historic sites on Canadian Arctic island. “The impacts of climate change can be hard to notice on an incremental basis, but when archeologist Peter Dawson stepped off a Twin Otter aircraft onto Yukon’s Herschel Island after a decades-long absence, there was nothing subtle about what he saw.”

Mummy returns: Voice of 3,000-year-old Egyptian priest brought to life (BBC)

BBC: Mummy returns: Voice of 3,000-year-old Egyptian priest brought to life. “When Nesyamun died, his voice fell silent, but 3,000 years on, a team of researchers have brought it back to life. They have done so by producing a 3D-printed voice box based Nesyamun’s vocal tract, which was scanned to establish its precise dimensions. By using the vocal tract with an artificial larynx sound, they synthesised a vowel sound meant to be similar to the voice of Nesyamun.”

Library of Congress: Library’s Collections Come to Life as 3D Models

Library of Congress: Library’s Collections Come to Life as 3D Models. “The 3D Digital Modeling, Imaging, and Printing Working Group was created to explore the use of 3D technologies to expand access to the Library’s collections. In Fall 2019, the working group launched a pilot in which a limited selection of items from the online collections were 3D scanned and the 3D models made publicly available. In the blog post below, I share what it was like to be trained to build 3D models alongside other Library staff, how we collaborated as a cross-functional working group, and lay out the potential uses of the models we created as part of the LOC 3D pilot project.”

KMSP: St. Thomas students develop scanner to create digital archive of tactile images for the blind

KMSP: St. Thomas students develop scanner to create digital archive of tactile images for the blind. “Engineering students from the University of St. Thomas unveiled a scanner they developed to better preserve tactile images created for the blind. When the Minnesota State Services for the Blind transcribes school textbooks into braille, images in textbooks are turned into tactile diagrams, so that a vision impaired reader can feel the image.”