BBC: Rio Tinto ordered to rebuild ancient Aboriginal caves

BBC: Rio Tinto ordered to rebuild ancient Aboriginal caves. “Mining giant Rio Tinto must rebuild a 46,000-year-old Aboriginal cave system it blew up in May, an Australian parliamentary inquiry has said. The Juukan Gorge caves in Western Australia were destroyed as part of an iron ore exploration project. In a report released on Wednesday, the inquiry blasted Rio Tinto’s ‘inexcusable’ act, and said they should compensate the traditional owners.”

Sydney Arts Guide: Carriberrie Website Celebrates Indigenous Song And Dance This NAIDOC Week

Sydney Arts Guide: Carriberrie Website Celebrates Indigenous Song And Dance This NAIDOC Week. “The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (NFSA) is marking NAIDOC Week 2020 with the release of Carriberrie, a breathtaking online journey of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander song and dance from the traditional to the contemporary, set across stunning Australian landscapes. Carriberrie features 156 dancers, 23 performances and nine cultural groups, and is available online now.”

National Indigenous Times: New online resources help Indigenous people trace ancestors

National Indigenous Times: New online resources help Indigenous people trace ancestors. “A series of introductory videos and virtual seminars, Finding Your Ancestors was created in collaboration with members of the NSW Aboriginal community and historians, Paul Irish and Michael Bennett. The resources aim to assist Aboriginal people in New South Wales with tracing their bloodlines to learn about their family and ancestors. The resources were developed to address the concern that whilst there is a wealth of online information for non-Indigenous people to track their family history, there is little support and guidance for Aboriginal people.”

ABC News (Australia): Bangarra Dance Theatre marks 30 years with digital archive and exhibition

ABC News (Australia): Bangarra Dance Theatre marks 30 years with digital archive and exhibition. “In October 1989, Australia’s premiere Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dance company was born around a kitchen table in the Sydney suburb of Glebe. The kitchen belonged to South-African born Cheryl Stone, a founding student of the National Aboriginal Islander Skills Development Association (NAISDA).”

National Tribune: Queenslands lost hi 1800s Indigenous police database launched at museum

National Tribune: Queenslands lost hi 1800s Indigenous police database launched at museum. Not sure what’s going on with the headline. “The archive – the Frontier Conflict and the Native Mounted Police in Queensland Database – is the result of a four-year project funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC) and undertaken by University of Southern Queensland (USQ), Flinders University, The University of Notre Dame, James Cook University and Northern Archaeology Consultancies. It was launched at Queensland Museum yesterday (December 9) and includes more than 11,000 documents about 200 Native Mounted Police camps, 12,000 artefacts, 400 officers, 850 troopers and 1800 frontier conflict events across Queensland through the 19th century.”

The Guardian: The cultural pioneers bringing oral storytelling to the next generation

The Guardian: The cultural pioneers bringing oral storytelling to the next generation. “For millennia, Indigenous Australian communities have been passing down histories, knowledge, language and customs, largely through oral storytelling. But in a world of digital addiction, where even the most remote parts of the country are being infiltrated by smartphones, telling stories via screens is the new necessary: a way to both preserve tradition and reach out to the young.”

Smithsonian Magazine: Website Provides Blueprint for Repatriating Aboriginal Remains

Smithsonian Magazine: Website Provides Blueprint for Repatriating Aboriginal Remains. “While efforts to bring Aboriginal remains home have increased in recent years, as the numbers show, there remains much work to be done when it comes to repatriation and community healing. A new website funded by the Australian Research Council and project partner organizations aims to support those intertwined efforts. Called Return, Reconcile, Renew (RRR), it illuminates the historic and ongoing implications of stealing ancestral remains from Aboriginal communities, provides a virtual space for support and healing, and also offers a roadmap to help Aboriginal communities successfully secure the return of stolen ancestral remains.”

Chicago Tribune: Illinois State Museum is first in world to return artifacts as part of Australian project to reclaim aboriginal art

I believe I saw this on Twitter, thanks to the Clomping Librarian. Thank you kindly! Chicago Tribune: Illinois State Museum is first in world to return artifacts as part of Australian project to reclaim aboriginal art . “Representatives from the Bardi Jawi and Aranda communities will travel to Springfield next month to pick up 42 artifacts, including boomerangs, shields, spears, and body ornaments, as part of an initiative funded by the Australian government to repatriate overseas artifacts called the Return of Cultural Heritage Project, according to a news release from the museum.”

National Library of Australia: Curatorial Research Fellow Bess Moylan explores how a better understanding of historical maps can support research into Aboriginal cultural landscapes.

National Library of Australia: Curatorial Research Fellow Bess Moylan explores how a better understanding of historical maps can support research into Aboriginal cultural landscapes.. “At first glance Australian historical maps tell stories of exploration and land development, but what happens when we take a look from another perspective? What other stories can we find if we decolonise historical maps? Historical maps can be useful when researching Aboriginal cultural landscapes and they can help researchers develop family histories, trace trading paths and Songlines, investigate traditional fire management regimes, reconstruct land use patterns, and explore local languages.”

‘Flying blind’: Researchers call for national database of Indigenous sites (SBS News Australia)

SBS News (Australia): ‘Flying blind’: Researchers call for national database of Indigenous sites. “Researchers have called for the development of a national database of historical and culturally significant Indigenous sites after findings that the lack of an up-to-date, national record has led to issues with the management of sites, including an inability to engage with threats such as climate change.”

Deadly Questions: ask Aboriginal champions anything about being Indigenous (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Deadly Questions: ask Aboriginal champions anything about being Indigenous. “The Victorian government has launched a new website that will allow non-Indigenous people to ask questions of and about Aboriginal people in an attempt to build understanding as part of a push towards signing a treaty. Called Deadly Questions, the website allows users to write in questions and receive a personal response from one or more ‘champions’.” I visited the site and was immediately asked to submit a question, so I don’t think it’s Australians-only.

ABC News (Australia): Storylines archive at State Library of WA offers a way to find photos of Indigenous family members

New-to-me, from ABC News (Australia): Storylines archive at State Library of WA offers a way to find photos of Indigenous family members. “Mr [Damien] Webb runs the Storylines project, which is dedicated to helping Aboriginal people find historic photographs of their families and communities which are held at the library. More than 7,000 photos are available online for Aboriginal people in Western Australia to search, and many have already found images of a parent or grandparent they’d never seen before.”