Offsetting as a path to full Open Access: MIT and the Royal Society of Chemistry sign first North American ‘read and publish’ agreement (In the Open)

In the Open: Offsetting as a path to full Open Access: MIT and the Royal Society of Chemistry sign first North American ‘read and publish’ agreement. “Over the past few years the MIT Libraries – like many US research libraries– have been watching with interest the development of ‘offsetting’ agreements in Europe and the UK. In offsetting agreements, a single license incorporates costs associated with access to paywalled articles and costs associated with open access publication. This type of agreement has emerged in Europe and the UK and been the source of both new deals and broken deals.”

LSE Impact Blog: Introducing the Free Journal Network – community-controlled open access publishing

LSE Impact Blog: Introducing the Free Journal Network – community-controlled open access publishing. “Discontent with the scholarly publishing industry continues to grow, as the prevailing subscription model appears increasingly unsustainable and open access big deals, one mooted alternative, unlikely to lead to optimal outcomes either. The Free Journal Network was established earlier this year in order to nurture and promote journals that are free to both authors and readers, and run according to the Fair Open Access Principles. Mark C. Wilson describes the progress the network has made so far, why community ownership is a crucial and underappreciated issue, and what research libraries can do to help.”

The Scientist: North American Universities Increasingly Cancel Publisher Packages

The Scientist: North American Universities Increasingly Cancel Publisher Packages. “Tomorrow (June 12), Florida State University will head into negotiations with the publisher Elsevier to see how it can resolve a pricing issue. Back in April, FSU announced that it would not renew a so-called ‘big deal’ with Elsevier in 2019, due to its ‘high and ever-increasing cost,’ and would instead subscribe to a subset of the most-needed journals. The university’s move represents the latest example of academic libraries walking away from these comprehensive and expensive subscriptions, which include all or most of a publisher’s catalog, and instead signing up for a la carte titles.”

Scholarly Kitchen: Has Google Become a Journal Publisher?

Scholarly Kitchen: Has Google Become a Journal Publisher?. “An initiative emanating out of Google Brain with the participation of YC Research, DeepMind, and OpenAI is the publication of what appears to be a ‘house’ journal called Distill, which is ostensibly published by the Distill Working Group. Where this working group resides isn’t clear. Distill is positioned as a research journal, claims to be peer-reviewed, and is indexed in Google Scholar. Their archival strategy consists of backups and the Internet Archive, but they claim they are thinking about adding LOCKSS to their archiving approach. ”

Nature Index: Open-access model is a return to the origins of journal publishing

Nature Index: Open-access model is a return to the origins of journal publishing. “The history of Philosophical Transactions is not exceptional in the annals of journal publishing. Members of scientific associations, such as the Royal Society, subsidised publications from their subscriptions for their first three centuries. Only in the last 50 years or so did the situation reverse, leading them to subsidise their subscriptions from their publications. Yet the period of profitability is disproportionately shaping researchers’ thinking about journal publishing.”

Wired: What Happens When Science Just Disappears?

Wired: What Happens When Science Just Disappears? . “KAY DICKERSIN KNEW she was leaping to the front lines of scholarly publication when she joined The Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials. Scientific print-publishing was—and still is—slow and cumbersome, and reading its results sometimes required researchers to go to the library. But as associate editor at this electronic peer-reviewed journal—one of the very first, launched in the summer of 1992—Dickersin was poised to help bring scientists into the new digital age.”

Nature: Web of Science owner buys tool that offers one-click access to journal articles

Nature: Web of Science owner buys tool that offers one-click access to journal articles. “The owner of the large scholarly search engine Web of Science — Clarivate Analytics — has bought a start-up company whose tool gives researchers one-click, legal access to journal articles even when off campus. Clarivate announced on 10 April that it had acquired the London-based company, called Kopernio, and said it will integrate the tool into its Web of Science database service, to which more than 7,500 institutions worldwide subscribe. It did not disclose the value of the deal.”