Germany vs Elsevier: universities win temporary journal access after refusing to pay fees (Nature)

Nature:
Germany vs Elsevier: universities win temporary journal access after refusing to pay fees
. “The Dutch publishing giant Elsevier has granted uninterrupted access to its paywalled journals for researchers at around 200 German universities and research institutes that had refused to renew their individual subscriptions at the end of 2017.”

PR Newswire: Journal of Biomedical Optics and Neurophotonics to become fully open access journals (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Journal of Biomedical Optics and Neurophotonics to become fully open access journals (PRESS RELEASE). “SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, has announced that its Journal of Biomedical Optics and Neurophotonics will become fully open access journals in January 2019. The Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO) has been published since 1996 and is edited by Lihong Wang of California Institute of Technology. Brian Pogue of Dartmouth College will assume the JBO editorship starting in January 2018. JBO publishes peer-reviewed papers on the use of modern optical technology for improved health care and biomedical research. Neurophotonics, edited by David Boas of Boston University, was launched by SPIE in 2014, and covers optical technologies applicable to study of the brain and their impact on the basic and clinical neuroscience applications.”

The Royal Society: Our new archive is live and free to use

The Royal Society: Our new archive is live and free to use. “Like most publishers, our content didn’t publish online first until 1997, so we have been busy updating the earlier content to make it easier to search, find and explore. In previous blog posts about the project the team have talked about the digitisation process, how we have made decisions about metadata, and the importance of language. For us this has been a massive undertaking as our content dates back to 1665!” This massive new collection is free to use until January 24th. So get some use out of your holiday break. Right?

LSE Impact Blog: Academic journals with a presence on Twitter are more widely disseminated and receive a higher number of citations

LSE Impact Blog: Academic journals with a presence on Twitter are more widely disseminated and receive a higher number of citations. “Previous research has shown that researchers’ active participation on Twitter can be a powerful way of promoting and disseminating academic outputs and improving the prospects of increased citations. But does the same hold true for the presence of academic journals on Twitter? José Luis Ortega examined the role of 350 scholarly journals, analysing how their articles were tweeted and cited. Findings reveal that articles from those journals that have their own individual Twitter handle are more tweeted about than articles from journals whose only Twitter presence is through a scientific society or publisher account. Articles published in journals with any sort of Twitter presence also receive more citations than those published in journals with no Twitter presence.”

Wired: It’s Gonna Get A Lot Easier To Break Science Journal Paywalls

Wired: It’s Gonna Get A Lot Easier To Break Science Journal Paywalls. “BEFORE WORLD WAR II most scientific journals were published by small professional societies. But capitalism’s gonna capitalism. By the early 1970s the top five scientific publishers—Reed-Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Springer, and Taylor & Francis—published about 20 percent of all journal articles. In 1996, when the transition to digital was underway and the PDF became the format of choice for journals, that number went up to 30 percent. Ten years later it was 50 percent.”

The “phantom reference:” How a made-up article got almost 400 citations (Retraction Watch)

Retraction Watch: The “phantom reference:” How a made-up article got almost 400 citations. “Pieter Kroonenberg, an emeritus professor of statistics at Leiden University in The Netherlands, was puzzled when he tried to locate a paper about academic writing and discovered the article didn’t exist. In fact, the journal—Journal of Science Communications—also didn’t exist. Perhaps Kroonenberg’s most bizarre discovery was that this made-up paper, ‘The art of writing a scientific article,’ had somehow been cited almost 400 times, according to Clarivate Analytics’ Web of Science.”

The Conversation: Academic journal publishing is headed for a day of reckoning

The Conversation: Academic journal publishing is headed for a day of reckoning. “Imagine a researcher working under deadline on a funding proposal for a new project. This is the day she’s dedicated to literature review – pulling examples from existing research in published journals to provide evidence for her great idea. Creating an up-to-date picture of where things stand in this narrow corner of her field involves 30 references, but she has access to only 27 of those via her library’s journal subscriptions. Now what?”