Nikkei Asia: China trounces U.S. in AI research output and quality

Nikkei Asia: China trounces U.S. in AI research output and quality. “Nikkei worked with Dutch scientific publisher Elsevier to review academic and conference papers on AI, using 800 or so AI-associated keywords to narrow down the papers. Looking at quantity, the number of AI papers exploded from about 25,000 in 2012 to roughly 135,000 in 2021. This mirrors the AI boom that began around 2012, when deep learning came to the fore. China has consistently stood atop the heap in terms of the volume of papers, the study shows. For 2021, it produced 43,000 papers — roughly twice as many as the U.S.”

Yale School of Medicine: Introducing Jot — a new open-source tool that help researchers with journal selection

Yale School of Medicine: Introducing Jot — a new open-source tool that help researchers with journal selection. “Say hello to Jot: a free, open-source web application that matches manuscripts in the fields of biomedicine and life sciences with suitable journals, based on a manuscript’s title, abstract, and (optionally) citations. Developed by the Townsend Lab at the Yale School of Public Health, Jot gathers a wealth of data on journal quality, impact, fit, and open access options that can be explored through a dashboard of linked, interactive visualizations.”

Nature: How to find, read and organize papers

Nature: How to find, read and organize papers. “I was in the first year of my PhD programme, having just joined my thesis laboratory. It was an important period of transition: I was working out what project I would focus on for the next five years, and knew that success would require a strong intellectual foundation. I spent long hours poring over papers, determined to master the literature in my research area. Yet despite good intentions, my efforts fell flat, due in large part to inefficiency.”

South China Morning Post: China’s largest academic paper database CNKI opens some services to individuals after Beijing’s antitrust probe

South China Morning Post: China’s largest academic paper database CNKI opens some services to individuals after Beijing’s antitrust probe. “China’s top academic paper database is opening some services to individual users such as students and academic professionals a month after its outsized influence over digital academic resources brought it under antitrust scrutiny.”

A New Use For AI: Summarizing Scientific Research For Seven-Year-Olds (The Verge)

The Verge: A New Use For AI: Summarizing Scientific Research For Seven-Year-Olds. “Academic writing often has a reputation for being hard to follow, but what if you could use machine learning to summarize arguments in scientific papers so that even a seven-year-old could understand them? That’s the idea behind tl;dr papers — a project that leverages recent advances in AI language processing to simplify science.” Unfortunately at this writing it’s “under maintenance” – hopefully it comes back soon.

IOP Publishing: ResearchGate and IOP Publishing partner to increase the visibility of academic content

IOP Publishing: ResearchGate and IOP Publishing partner to increase the visibility of academic content. IOP Publishing is the publishing arm of the Institute of Physics. “ResearchGate and IOP Publishing (IOPP) today announce a new collaboration agreement to explore ways to support the scientific community through syndication of IOPP peer reviewed scholarly content on ResearchGate’s platform…. The agreement – which marks the first time a physics society publisher has made its content available on the platform – will initially run for 12 months. Over 36,000 full text articles will be uploaded from open-access (OA) journals Environmental Research Letters, Materials Research Express and New Journal of Physics and hybrid journals Biomedical Materials, Classical Quantum Gravity, Physica Scripta and J Phys B.”

Google Scholar Blog: Save papers to read later

Google Scholar Blog: Save papers to read later. “Found an interesting paper and don’t have time to read it right now? Today we are adding a reading list to your Scholar Library to help you save papers and read them later. You can also use it to save papers you find off-campus but want to read on-campus where you have access to the full text, or papers you find on your smartphone but want to read on a larger screen.”

Nature: Scammers impersonate guest editors to get sham papers published

Nature: Scammers impersonate guest editors to get sham papers published. “Hundreds of articles published in peer-reviewed journals are being retracted after scammers exploited the processes for publishing special issues to get poor-quality papers — sometimes consisting of complete gibberish — into established journals. In some cases, fraudsters posed as scientists and offered to guest-edit issues that they then filled with sham papers.”

Wired: Humans Can’t Be the Sole Keepers of Scientific Knowledge

Wired: Humans Can’t Be the Sole Keepers of Scientific Knowledge. “Writing scientific knowledge in a programming-like language will be dry, but it will be sustainable, because new concepts will be directly added to the library of science that machines understand. Plus, as machines are taught more scientific facts, they will be able to help scientists streamline their logical arguments; spot errors, inconsistencies, plagiarism, and duplications; and highlight connections. AI with an understanding of physical laws is more powerful than AI trained on data alone, so science-savvy machines will be able to help future discoveries. Machines with a great knowledge of science could assist rather than replace human scientists.” I have so many conflicting thoughts about this article that I gave myself a headache. Be warned.

Techdirt: Top Publishers Aim To Own The Entire Academic Research Publishing Stack; Here’s How To Stop That Happening

Techdirt: Top Publishers Aim To Own The Entire Academic Research Publishing Stack; Here’s How To Stop That Happening. “Techdirt’s coverage of open access — the idea that the fruits of publicly-funded scholarship should be freely available to all — shows that the results so far have been mixed. On the one hand, many journals have moved to an open access model. On the other, the overall subscription costs for academic institutions have not gone down, and neither have the excessive profit margins of academic publishers. Despite that success in fending off this attempt to re-invent the way academic work is disseminated, publishers want more. In particular, they want more money and more power.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: The Mysterious Case of the Nonsense Papers

Chronicle of Higher Education: The Mysterious Case of the Nonsense Papers. “The paper appeared last month in the Arabian Journal of Geosciences, which is one of several thousand journals put out by the publishing giant Springer Nature. If this was just one weird paper in an obscure journal, it probably wouldn’t be noteworthy. But hundreds — 412, to be exact — of equally bizarre papers have popped up in the same journal in recent months…. One minute you’re being lectured on ecological risk assessment, and the next you’re learning about the many similarities between badminton and tennis. So what exactly is going on here? And what does it tell us, if anything, about the state of academic publishing?”

Boing Boing: A web tool that converts PDF scientific papers into HTML

Boing Boing: A web tool that converts PDF scientific papers into HTML. “The folks at the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence just released an intriguing tool — ‘Paper to HTML’, which lets you upload a scientific paper and it turns it into an HTML web page. The goal, as they wrote in their email, is to improve accessibility: Screen-readers and accessibility tech usually finds it a lot easier to parse HTML than PDFs.” Ooo!

Techdirt: Sci-Hub Celebrates 10 Years Of Existence, With A Record 88 Million Papers Available, And A Call For Funds To Help It Add AI And Go Open Source

Techdirt: Sci-Hub Celebrates 10 Years Of Existence, With A Record 88 Million Papers Available, And A Call For Funds To Help It Add AI And Go Open Source. “To celebrate ten years offering a large proportion of the world’s academic papers for free — against all the odds, and in the face of repeated legal action — Sci-Hub has launched a funding drive.”