PR Newswire: Journals Published by Arab Research Community Set to Benefit From Greater Global Visibility (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Journals Published by Arab Research Community Set to Benefit From Greater Global Visibility (PRESS RELEASE). “An agreement between the Association of Arab Universities and Elsevier, the information analytics business specializing in science and health, has been reached to co-create the Arab Journals Platform, an open electronic network of scholarly journals that will help raise awareness of leading research carried out in the Arab world.”

UNIT: Norwegian research institutions have decided not to renew their agreement with Elsevier

Thanks to Jessamyn West for noting this on Twitter. UNIT: Norwegian research institutions have decided not to renew their agreement with Elsevier. “The offer from Elsevier is a long way from fulfilling the Norwegian requirements for open access to research articles. There is also no movement in transitioning the agreement from paying to read to paying for open publishing. The agreement with Elsevier will therefore not be renewed for 2019. The rectorates at the universities of Bergen, Oslo, Tromsø and Trondheim all support this decision.”

TorrentFreak: As More Universities ‘Ditch’ Elsevier, Sci-Hub Blossoms

TorrentFreak: As More Universities ‘Ditch’ Elsevier, Sci-Hub Blossoms. “The University of California (UC) is the latest institution to cancel its subscription to leading academic publisher Elsevier. UC cites high costs and the lack of open access research among the reasons. This likely means an increase in traffic for Sci-Hub, the site that’s often referred to referred to as ‘The Pirate Bay for Science’, which may actually play a bigger role than some suspect.”

University of California: UC terminates subscriptions with world’s largest scientific publisher in push for open access to publicly funded research

University of California: UC terminates subscriptions with world’s largest scientific publisher in push for open access to publicly funded research . “As a leader in the global movement toward open access to publicly funded research, the University of California is taking a firm stand by deciding not to renew its subscriptions with Elsevier. Despite months of contract negotiations, Elsevier was unwilling to meet UC’s key goal: securing universal open access to UC research while containing the rapidly escalating costs associated with for-profit journals.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: As Scholars Are Driven to Less Prestigious Journals, New Measures of Quality Emerge

Chronicle of Higher Education: As Scholars Are Driven to Less Prestigious Journals, New Measures of Quality Emerge. “As more scholars publish in less-recognized open-access journals, the search is on for other ways to measure the impact of their research. One potential measure of reach is in online sharing: posts on Twitter, blog links, and other engagement metrics of various kinds. HuMetricsHSS, a humanities and social-sciences project that tracks indicators in those fields, includes as another such metric ‘openness,’ including a researcher’s ‘transparency, candor, and accountability, in addition to the practice of making one’s research open access at all stages.'”

Chronicle of Higher Education: A Turning Point for Scholarly Publishing

Chronicle of Higher Education: A Turning Point for Scholarly Publishing. “Debate over the future of scholarly publishing felt remote to Kathryn M. Jones, an associate professor of biology at Florida State University — that is, until she attended a Faculty Senate meeting last year. There she learned that the library might renegotiate its $2-million subscription with the publishing behemoth Elsevier, which would limit her and her colleagues’ access to groundbreaking research. Horror sank in. Like other experimental scientists, Jones regularly skims articles published in subscription journals to plan future experiments. What would happen if she couldn’t access that body of important work with the click of a button?”

Minnesota Daily: New website simplifies scholarly articles

Minnesota Daily: New website simplifies scholarly articles. “Current and former University of Minnesota students are hoping to create a ‘SparkNotes’ for scholarly articles with a new website. Bibliate is a subscription-based online tool that rehashes and summarizes articles from the subjects of anthropology, biology, history, political science and psychology. Founded by 2018 University alumnus Andrew Swisher, the company launched on Jan. 14 with the help of fellow students.”