University of Arizona College of Science: Lum. AI (Tuscon)

Tuscon: University of Arizona College of Science: Lum. AI. “Researchers worldwide publish 2.5 million journal articles each year, adding to the tens of millions of scholarly articles in circulation. For a researcher or clinician, developing a holistic understanding of a field — for example, the systematic matching of genomic alterations in a tumor with proper drug treatments — is an immense task. Now imagine that those researchers, faced with trying to understand the various mechanisms and cellular processes involved in a specific tumor type, had a new tool: an automated system that could review all that literature — analyzing each academic paper in seconds — and extract key information that could help them generate easily interpretable answers and conclusions.”

Science: How to shine in Indonesian science? Game the system

Science: How to shine in Indonesian science? Game the system. “Last July, when Indonesia’s Ministry of Research, Technology and Higher Education (RISTEK) here honored eight researchers, along with institutions and journals, for their exceptional contributions to science, observers noticed something odd. Many of the laureates were relatively unknown academics from second-tier universities; underdogs had apparently become leaders. It didn’t take curious scientists long to figure out why.”

Wired: The Quest to Topple Science-Stymying Academic Paywalls

Wired: The Quest to Topple Science-Stymying Academic Paywalls. “Science is built, enhanced, and developed through the open and structured sharing of knowledge. Yet some publishers charge so much for subscriptions to their academic journals that even the libraries of the world’s wealthiest universities such as Harvard are no longer able to afford the prices. Those publishers’ profit margins rival those of the most profitable companies in the world, even though research is largely underwritten by governments, and the publishers don’t pay authors and researchers or the peer reviewers who evaluate those works. How is such an absurd structure able to sustain itself—and how might we change it?”

Science: Will the world embrace Plan S, the radical proposal to mandate open access to science papers?

Science: Will the world embrace Plan S, the radical proposal to mandate open access to science papers?. “How far will Plan S spread? Since the September 2018 launch of the Europe-backed program to mandate immediate open access (OA) to scientific literature, 16 funders in 13 countries have signed on. That’s still far shy of Plan S’s ambition: to convince the world’s major research funders to require immediate OA to all published papers stemming from their grants. Whether it will reach that goal depends in part on details that remain to be settled, including a cap on the author charges that funders will pay for OA publication. But the plan has gained momentum: In December 2018, China stunned many by expressing strong support for Plan S. This month, a national funding agency in Africa is expected to join, possibly followed by a second U.S. funder. Others around the world are considering whether to sign on.”

Insider Higher Education: Another Month for Elsevier Talks With U California

Inside Higher Education: Another Month for Elsevier Talks With U California. “The University of California System is engaged in a high-stakes battle with Elsevier, the publishing giant whose contract with the UC system is slated to expire at the end of December. With UC threatening to walk away unless it wins substantial changes in the way Elsevier charges for journal access, many see the showdown as significant. On Friday, UC announced that it has agreed with Elsevier on a one-month extension to the contract that is expiring.”

Defense One: Academic Paywalls Harm National Security

Defense One: Academic Paywalls Harm National Security. “A previous employer of mine, a consultancy that supports senior national security leaders, gave up its academic journal subscriptions in the wake of price hikes. Some military research centers simply make do with minimal access. The high cost of academic articles has even dissuaded defense companies, from time to time, from turning concepts into reality. But perhaps you doubt that scholarly journals offer extensive benefits to national security. To illustrate these benefits, I will focus on three: informing policy, skill and capability building, and technological insight.”

Los Angeles Times: In UC’s battle with the world’s largest scientific publisher, the future of information is at stake

Los Angeles Times: In UC’s battle with the world’s largest scientific publisher, the future of information is at stake. “Boiled down to dollars and cents, the battle between the University of California, the nation’s premier producer of academic research, and Reed Elsevier, the world’s leading publisher of academic journals, can seem almost trivial. UC is paying almost $11 million this year for subscriptions to some 1,500 Elsevier journals. That’s not much when measured against the university’s core budget of $9.3 billion. But in fact it’s a very big deal — big enough for the university to consider dropping the subscriptions entirely when its current five-year contract with Elsevier expires on Dec. 31. Scores of town hall meetings for UC faculty to discuss the ongoing negotiations between UC and Elsevier have been scheduled across the system as the deadline approaches. What faculty are likely to hear, in the words of Jeff MacKie-Mason, the university librarian at UC Berkeley, is that ‘we’re pretty far apart at this point.'”