Nature: Hundreds of extreme self-citing scientists revealed in new database

Nature: Hundreds of extreme self-citing scientists revealed in new database. “[Sundarapandian] Vaidyanathan, a computer scientist at the Vel Tech R&D Institute of Technology, a privately run institute, is an extreme example: he has received 94% of his citations from himself or his co-authors up to 2017, according to a study in PLoS Biology this month1. He is not alone. The data set, which lists around 100,000 researchers, shows that at least 250 scientists have amassed more than 50% of their citations from themselves or their co-authors, while the median self-citation rate is 12.7%.”

National Network of Libraries of Medicine: Florence Nightingale and the Data Visualization Society

National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM): Florence Nightingale and the Data Visualization Society. “On July 15th, the Data Visualization Society introduced their new online publication, Nightingale, named in her honor. The Society, itself a new community, was formed ‘to collect and establish best practices, fostering a community that supports members as they grow and develop data visualization skills’ and Nightingale will publish stories covering data viz techniques, design processes, and applications in a variety of fields.”

Phys .org: Russian website reportedly selling science article authorships

Phys .org: Russian website reportedly selling science article authorships. “Several websites are reporting that a Russian website is selling authorships for research papers being published in several journals. Sites making such claims include retractionwatch.com and Science Chronicle—they are further claiming that the Web of Science group Clarivate Analytics has been investigating the Russian-based website—called 123mi.ru—and has found evidence that the group behind the site is selling authorships on research papers that are set for publication in scientific journals.”

Google Scholar Blog: 2019 Scholar Metrics Released

Google Scholar Blog: 2019 Scholar Metrics Released. “Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Today, we are releasing the 2019 version of Scholar Metrics. This release covers articles published in 2014–2018 and includes citations from all articles that were indexed in Google Scholar as of July 2019.”

Nature: The plan to mine the world’s research papers

Nature: The plan to mine the world’s research papers. “Carl Malamud is on a crusade to liberate information locked up behind paywalls — and his campaigns have scored many victories. He has spent decades publishing copyrighted legal documents, from building codes to court records, and then arguing that such texts represent public-domain law that ought to be available to any citizen online. Sometimes, he has won those arguments in court. Now, the 60-year-old American technologist is turning his sights on a new objective: freeing paywalled scientific literature. And he thinks he has a legal way to do it.”

ASAPbio: Launching Transpose, a database of journal policies on preprinting & peer review

ASAPbio: Launching Transpose, a database of journal policies on preprinting & peer review. “Today, we’re excited to announce the launch of Transpose (@TransposeSCI), a database of journal peer review, co-reviewing, and preprint policies relating to media coverage, licensing, versions, and citation. These policies can often be difficult to find, unclear, or undefined. Our hope is to bring them to light so that authors, readers, reviewers, and other stakeholders can more easily find journals that align with their values. At the same time, editors can use this resource to draw inspiration from changing practices at other journals.”

Campus Technology: UC System, Carnegie Mellon Pilot Tool for Sharing Research Methods

Campus Technology: UC System, Carnegie Mellon Pilot Tool for Sharing Research Methods . “The University of California system and Carnegie Mellon University are both piloting the use of a platform … in an effort to bring down a major barrier to reproducible research: the creation and sharing of detailed methods in published articles. As part of the larger open access movement, the universities hope to facilitate collaborative method development and to increase research reproducibility.”