Emory University: Rollins Launches CoCites, a Radical New Scientific Search Tool

Emory University: Rollins Launches CoCites, a Radical New Scientific Search Tool. “Searching scientific literature is inefficient and ineffective. A complete search on a topic requires an extensive query that combines all relevant keywords and their synonyms. A simple search retrieves only part of the relevant literature depending on the keywords that are searched. With CoCites, users don’t enter keywords, they enter or select the title of the article for which they would like to find related content. The tool retrieves these other articles through co-citations. Articles that are frequently cited together with the selected paper appear at the top of the search results.”

BusinessWire: SPIE Digital Library to Reduce Institutional Subscription Prices by 10% for 2021 (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: SPIE Digital Library to Reduce Institutional Subscription Prices by 10% for 2021 (PRESS RELEASE). “SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, today announced a 10% price reduction for 2021 SPIE Digital Library and SPIE Journal institutional subscriptions….The SPIE Digital Library, the world’s largest collection of optics and photonics applied research, comprises more than 525,000 publications. SPIE is committed to enabling the broadest possible dissemination of information to researchers, engineers, and academics worldwide.”

Leiden University: New database reveals plants’ secret relationships with fungi

Leiden University: New database reveals plants’ secret relationships with fungi. “Almost all vascular plants have a relationship with a fungus in their roots that allow them to obtain nutrients from the soil. This relationship, called mycorrhiza, is symbiotic, since the fungi too benefit from it. It is so important that most plant species would not be able survive without it. Until now, information on this symbiotic relationship has been scattered throughout myriad scientific publications.”

ZDNet: Verizon introduces open-source, big data coronavirus search engine

ZDNet: Verizon introduces open-source, big data coronavirus search engine. “As we struggle to get a grip on exactly how COVID-19 makes us ill and what we can do about it, researchers have created over 50,000 articles. That’s a lot of information! So, how do you make sense of it all? Verizon Media is doing it by using Vespa. This is an open-source, big data processing program to create a coronavirus academic research search engine: CORD-19 Search.”

University World News: Hunt for coronavirus cure is making science more open

University World News: Hunt for coronavirus cure is making science more open. “…while cities are locked down and borders are closed in response to the coronavirus outbreak, science is becoming more open. This openness is already making a difference to scientists’ response to the virus and has the potential to change the world. But it’s not as simple as making every research finding available to anyone for any purpose. Without care and responsibility, there is a danger that open science can be misused or contribute to the spread of misinformation.”

TNW: Learning during the quarantine: You can read JSTOR’s Open Access content without an account

TNW: Learning during the quarantine: You can read JSTOR’s Open Access content without an account. “Yesterday, JSTOR, the famous digital academic library, tweeted that 6,000 of its eBooks and over 150 journals are open for anyone to read. The organization noted it’s bringing out 26 public health journal archives, which you can read until June 30. For folks who previously haven’t had access to JSTOR’s library, you can now rifle through all its open access content without having to create an account.”

TechCrunch: Twitter rewrites Developer Policy to better support academic research and use of ‘good’ bots

TechCrunch: Twitter rewrites Developer Policy to better support academic research and use of ‘good’ bots. “Twitter today updated its Developer Policy to clarify rules around data usage, including in academic research, as well as its position on bots, among other things. The policy has also been entirely rewritten in an effort to simplify the language used and make it more conversational, Twitter says. The new policy has been shortened from eight sections to four, and the accompanying Twitter Developer Agreement has been updated to align with the Policy changes, as well.”