The Atlantic: Don’t Shut Down the Internet’s Biggest Jihadist Archive

The Atlantic: Don’t Shut Down the Internet’s Biggest Jihadist Archive. “If you discover that your neighbor—a decent guy and a known history buff—maintains a small collection of Nazi memorabilia, you might not think less of him, especially if his record of tolerance and anti-fascism is beyond reproach. Now imagine that he maintains not a small collection but the largest in the world, in private or public hands. He lets anyone examine it, including actual Nazis, without asking for a name or a reason. How big does the collection have to get before you start murmuring with the neighbors, and stop inviting him to cookouts and seders?”

New Scientist: Time to break academic publishing’s stranglehold on research

New Scientist: Time to break academic publishing’s stranglehold on research. “HERE is a trivia question for you: what is the most profitable business in the world? You might think oil, or maybe banking. You would be wrong. The answer is academic publishing. Its profit margins are vast, reportedly in the region of 40 per cent. The reason it is so lucrative is because most of the costs of its content is picked up by taxpayers. Publicly funded researchers do the work, write it up and judge its merits. And yet the resulting intellectual property ends up in the hands of the publishers.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: Will Blockchain Revolutionize Scholarly Journal Publishing?

Chronicle of Higher Education: Will Blockchain Revolutionize Scholarly Journal Publishing?. “Since the 1990s, some academic netizens have predicted that open access will upend scholarly journal publishing, yet an oligopoly still dominates the $25-billion industry. Orvium, a European start-up, recently joined those taking on the giant players. It offers a publishing and business plan based on blockchain — a coding structure that embeds origins and changes within a file. The format will allow for open-access or other licensing models to be determined by each client journal’s editors. The company’s ultimate objective is ‘to be the leading publication platform for the research community while returning the benefits of science to society.'”

The Register: Here’s a search engine for all you boffins and eggheads that makes it easier to learn science

The Register: Here’s a search engine for all you boffins and eggheads that makes it easier to learn science. “The whole search engine is built from a knowledge base. Researchers and engineers built tools to like Science Parse, to automatically extract metadata from the PDF files of papers to take the titles, author information, abstract, and references and adds it onto Semantic Scholar. DeepFigures takes all the useful graphs and tables in the paper. The new features include a column on the right hand side charting the paper’s impact. Natural language processing is used to search for keywords linked to the article to see how often it has been cited by other researchers or discussed on mentioned in Twitter discussions.”

Science Magazine: What a massive database of retracted papers reveals about science publishing’s ‘death penalty’

Science Magazine: What a massive database of retracted papers reveals about science publishing’s ‘death penalty’. “Nearly a decade ago, headlines highlighted a disturbing trend in science: The number of articles retracted by journals had increased 10-fold during the previous 10 years. Fraud accounted for some 60% of those retractions; one offender, anesthesiologist Joachim Boldt, had racked up almost 90 retractions after investigators concluded he had fabricated data and committed other ethical violations. Boldt may have even harmed patients by encouraging the adoption of an unproven surgical treatment. Science, it seemed, faced a mushrooming crisis. The alarming news came with some caveats. “