Boston Globe: Chan Zuckerberg philanthropy taps UMass Amherst to create AI scientific research tool

Boston Globe: Chan Zuckerberg philanthropy taps UMass Amherst to create AI scientific research tool. “A philanthropy started by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan has awarded a $5.5 million grant to the University of Massachusetts Amherst’s Center for Data Science to create a free tool that would make millions of published scientific and medical findings easily accessible to researchers worldwide. The project, called Computable Knowledge, would use a branch of artificial intelligence known as knowledge representation and reasoning to create a navigable map of scientific findings from millions of new and historical research articles. The project aims to help scientists stay current on new research and to make it easier to find previously unknown connections between findings in genetics, diseases, drugs, and treatments.”

Nature: Science search engine links papers to grants and patents

Nature: Science search engine links papers to grants and patents. “The marketplace for science search engines is competitive and crowded. But a database launched on 15 January aims to provide academics with new ways to analyse the scholarly literature — including the grant funding behind it. Dimensions not only indexes papers and their citations, but also — uniquely among scholarly databases — connects publications to their related grants, funding agencies, patents and clinical trials. The tool ‘should give researchers more power to look at their fields and follow the money’, says James Wilsdon, a research-policy specialist at the University of Sheffield, UK.”

Demographic Research: Using Twitter data for demographic research

Demographic Research: Using Twitter data for demographic research. “Social media data is a promising source of social science data. However, deriving the demographic characteristics of users and dealing with the nonrandom, nonrepresentative populations from which they are drawn represent challenges for social scientists. Given the growing use of social media data in social science research, this paper asks two questions: 1) To what extent are findings obtained with social media data generalizable to broader populations, and 2) what is the best practice for estimating demographic information from Twitter data?” The paper itself is a freely-available PDF.

The Royal Society: Our new archive is live and free to use

The Royal Society: Our new archive is live and free to use. “Like most publishers, our content didn’t publish online first until 1997, so we have been busy updating the earlier content to make it easier to search, find and explore. In previous blog posts about the project the team have talked about the digitisation process, how we have made decisions about metadata, and the importance of language. For us this has been a massive undertaking as our content dates back to 1665!” This massive new collection is free to use until January 24th. So get some use out of your holiday break. Right?

ROI NJ: Database aims to keep research dollars in N.J.

ROI NJ: Database aims to keep research dollars in N.J.. “New Jersey is aiming to recoup research dollars that are escaping the state and elevate its research institutes with a new database initiative announced Wednesday. The inaugural meeting of the New Jersey Research Asset Database board of advisors, which is currently under development, confirmed that Amsterdam-based Elsevier has been selected to build the platform that will connect the state’s companies with research opportunities with five New Jersey universities.”

Scoop NZ: Complete online record of 150 years of discovery

Scoop NZ: Complete online record of 150 years of discovery. “All copies of the Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand, one of New Zealand’s most important research publications, are now available online, thanks to a collaborative project between Royal Society Te Apārangi and the National Library of New Zealand. The project has filled in the missing years between 1961 and 1970.”

Quartz: The titans of AI are getting their work double-checked by students

Quartz: The titans of AI are getting their work double-checked by students. “We trust in science because we can verify the accuracy of its claims. We test and verify that accuracy by repeating the scientist’s original experiments. What happens when those tests fail, particularly in a field that has the potential to create billions of dollars of revenue?”