LSE Impact Blog: The academic papers researchers regard as significant are not those that are highly cited

LSE Impact Blog: The academic papers researchers regard as significant are not those that are highly cited . “For many years, academia has relied on citation count as the main way to measure the impact or importance of research, informing metrics such as the Impact Factor and the h-index. But how well do these metrics actually align with researchers’ subjective evaluation of impact and significance? Rachel Borchardt and Matthew R. Hartings report on a study that compares researchers’ perceptions of significance, importance, and what is highly cited with actual citation data. The results reveal a strikingly large discrepancy between perceptions of impact and the metric we currently use to measure it.”

Al-Fanar Media: Portal Gives Researchers More Public Exposure

Al-Fanar Media: Portal Gives Researchers More Public Exposure. “Arab researchers have long complained about the lack of public interest in and support for their research, which leaves their work forgotten in the filing cabinets of academic institutions and research centers. But a new project based in the Lebanese capital seeks to change that. The online tool, known as the Portal for Social Impact of Scientific Research Targeting Research in/on the Arab World, or PSISR, was launched last month by the American University of Beirut’s Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs.”

Research Remix: Where’s Waldo With Public Access Links

Research Remix (what a great blog name!): Where’s Waldo With Public Access Links. “Was digging into some publisher pages today, and I noticed a trend. Links to Public Access author manuscripts that CHORUS says are publicly available thanks to funder mandates are often very difficult to actually find on publisher pages. Want to see what I mean?”

Forbes: Why Are Academics Upset With Facebook’s New Privacy Rules?

Forbes: Why Are Academics Upset With Facebook’s New Privacy Rules?. “Last month a group of leading academics signed an open letter condemning Facebook’s new privacy rules and API changes that greatly restrict the ability of outsiders to mass harvest data from the platform without the knowledge or consent of users. The letter reflects the view across a broad swath of the academic community that any increase in user privacy protections that prevents them from being able to harvest our personal private information without our knowledge or against our will and turn us all into digital lab rats is simply unacceptable. What does this tell us about the future of online privacy and whether the very academic community that is so quick to condemn Facebook’s own research is willing to apply the same standards to their own work?”

Boing Boing: Thousands of prominent AI researchers tell Nature they won’t have anything to do with its new paywalled journal

Boing Boing: Thousands of prominent AI researchers tell Nature they won’t have anything to do with its new paywalled journal . “Over 2,000 prominent AI researchers, including esteemed industry figures from the biggest of Big Tech, have signed an open letter to Nature telling it that they will not “submit to, review, or edit” its new, closed-access ‘Nature Machine Intelligence.'”

Nieman Lab: Facebook and Twitter are opening up a bit to academic researchers, so platforms “can make better decisions”

Nieman Lab: Facebook and Twitter are opening up a bit to academic researchers, so platforms “can make better decisions”. “Facebook announced on Monday, ahead of CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s appearance before Congress on Wednesday, that it plans to give a limited group of soon-to-be determined academics some access to Facebook data as needed, with a research emphasis on how Facebook influences elections in different countries around the word.”

University of Colorado Boulder: Who might be spying on your tweets in the name of science?

University of Colorado Boulder: Who might be spying on your tweets in the name of science?. “The majority of Twitter users are unaware that researchers freely collect and analyze their tweets—including deleted ones—in the name of science. Most believe that this shouldn’t be allowed without their consent. And many wrongly assume it would be a violation of Twitter’s terms of service, according to a new study by researchers from CU Boulder and University of Kentucky.”