Chronicle of Higher Education: As Scholars Are Driven to Less Prestigious Journals, New Measures of Quality Emerge

Chronicle of Higher Education: As Scholars Are Driven to Less Prestigious Journals, New Measures of Quality Emerge. “As more scholars publish in less-recognized open-access journals, the search is on for other ways to measure the impact of their research. One potential measure of reach is in online sharing: posts on Twitter, blog links, and other engagement metrics of various kinds. HuMetricsHSS, a humanities and social-sciences project that tracks indicators in those fields, includes as another such metric ‘openness,’ including a researcher’s ‘transparency, candor, and accountability, in addition to the practice of making one’s research open access at all stages.'”

Chronicle of Higher Education: A Turning Point for Scholarly Publishing

Chronicle of Higher Education: A Turning Point for Scholarly Publishing. “Debate over the future of scholarly publishing felt remote to Kathryn M. Jones, an associate professor of biology at Florida State University — that is, until she attended a Faculty Senate meeting last year. There she learned that the library might renegotiate its $2-million subscription with the publishing behemoth Elsevier, which would limit her and her colleagues’ access to groundbreaking research. Horror sank in. Like other experimental scientists, Jones regularly skims articles published in subscription journals to plan future experiments. What would happen if she couldn’t access that body of important work with the click of a button?”

University of Virginia: UVA Library, UVA Press Partner To Make Original Scholarship Freely Available

University of Virginia: UVA Library, UVA Press Partner To Make Original Scholarship Freely Available. “Students and parents often and understandably object to the high cost of textbooks, and colleges and universities also incur high costs to make academic research in scholarly journals available to students and faculty alike. It’s a problem that affects everyone – students, researchers and scholars, the colleges and universities where they work, and the public who often have no easy access to the latest studies. A new partnership at the University of Virginia aims to solve these problems and to make new knowledge more readily available – and free.”

Harvard Gazette: Radcliffe scholar Nicole C. Nelson probes key moments in reproducibility crisis

Harvard Gazette: Radcliffe scholar Nicole C. Nelson probes key moments in reproducibility crisis. “Nicole C. Nelson, Radcliffe’s Katherine Hampson Bessell Fellow, examines scientists’ assumptions about the natural world and how they play into their research. This year at Radcliffe, the assistant professor of science and technology studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will delve into the scientific reproducibility crisis, a recent phenomenon in which subsequent scientific investigation has found many supposedly stable findings to be difficult to replicate.”

Kellogg Insight: Who Gets Blamed When a Group Project Goes Wrong?

Kellogg Insight: Who Gets Blamed When a Group Project Goes Wrong?. “New research into that question calls to mind the curious case of one much-maligned researcher. It began in 1986, when six researchers published a major paper in the journal Cell. Among the authors were a little-known assistant professor named Thereza Imanishi-Kari, who had devised the paper’s central experiment, and Nobel Prize winner David Baltimore. But soon after the paper was published, Imanishi-Kari was accused of falsifying her data.”

London School of Economics and Political Science: Differences in men’s and women’s academic productivity persist and are most pronounced for publications in top journals

London School of Economics and Political Science: Differences in men’s and women’s academic productivity persist and are most pronounced for publications in top journals. “Sabrina Mayer & Justus Rathmann present statistical evidence indicating a persistent difference in research productivity between male and female professors in psychology. Examining the publication records of full psychology professors in Germany, they reveal that female professors are less likely to publish in top ranked journals and are more likely to adopt publication strategies that are focused on producing book chapters in edited collections.”

University of Arizona College of Science: Lum. AI (Tuscon)

Tuscon: University of Arizona College of Science: Lum. AI. “Researchers worldwide publish 2.5 million journal articles each year, adding to the tens of millions of scholarly articles in circulation. For a researcher or clinician, developing a holistic understanding of a field — for example, the systematic matching of genomic alterations in a tumor with proper drug treatments — is an immense task. Now imagine that those researchers, faced with trying to understand the various mechanisms and cellular processes involved in a specific tumor type, had a new tool: an automated system that could review all that literature — analyzing each academic paper in seconds — and extract key information that could help them generate easily interpretable answers and conclusions.”