The Syllabus: UNCG’s new Black Lives Matter protests archive (Winston-Salem Journal)

Winston-Salem Journal: The Syllabus: UNCG’s new Black Lives Matter protests archive. “The latest addition to UNCG’s collections is an archive of materials from area Black Lives Matter protests. The university is now seeking photos, videos, flyers, posters, protest signs, clothing and anything else from the beginning of the BLM movement in 2013 or from the recent local protests over the death of George Floyd. These items will be part of the library’s new Triad Black Lives Matter Protest Collection.”

The Next Web: This AI uses emoji to protect BLM protestors from facial recognition

The Next Web: This AI uses emoji to protect BLM protestors from facial recognition. “If you’ve attended any of the recent Black Lives Matter protests, there’s a good chance you’ve been caught on camera. And if your image has been shared on social media, it could end up in a facial recognition database used by police…. These concerns led Stanford Machine Learning researchers to develop a new anonymization tool: the BLMPrivacyBot.”

Gizmodo: DHS Is Spying on Social Media to Track Threats to Statues

Gizmodo: DHS Is Spying on Social Media to Track Threats to Statues. “While the DHS memo states that intelligence collection can only occur with ‘reasonable suspicion’ and not for the ‘sole purpose of monitoring activities protected by the First Amendment,’ it is unclear what types of actions an analyst might define as reasonably suspicious. For instance, if someone post a video to Facebook of a stranger spray painting ‘f*ck 12’ on a federal building, are they now guilty by association—implicating their entire network in this single act of vandalism?” Asterisk mine, added in the hope of having a snowball’s chance of getting this newsletter through corporate email filters.

Hypebeast: Artists Rights Society and Plywood Project to Create Massive Database of Protest Art

Hypebeast: Artists Rights Society and Plywood Project to Create Massive Database of Protest Art. “The Artists Rights Society (ARS) is teaming up with Plywood Project to launch an open-source database of all protest and street art from demonstrations against police brutality and racial injustice sparked by the police killing of George Floyd in May. ‘This database—built in consultation with ARS—will be open-source and collaborative: anyone will be able to add to it and help in its attribution,’ as per a statement.”

Bustle: Are Instagram Activism Resources Helpful Or Performative?

Bustle: Are Instagram Activism Resources Helpful Or Performative?. “Pastel pink Instagram infographics are flooding our social media feeds in response to the Black Lives Matter movement. From reading lists to quotes by prominent progressives or illustrations relaying underreported events, timelines have become rosy streams of resources. However, given the current political unrest, global pandemic and accelerated climate change, do these new Instagram infographics achieve anything? While substantial societal change is needed, it’s important to separate the helpful from the performative when it comes to digital activism.”

BBC: Iran halts execution of three protesters after online campaign

BBC: Iran halts execution of three protesters after online campaign. “Iran has halted the executions of three men who were sentenced to death over anti-government protests last year, according to one of their lawyers. Babak Paknia told reporters that a request for a retrial had been accepted by the supreme court. The decision comes after a hashtag against their execution was used millions of times online.”

The Guardian: Did you protest recently? Your face might be in a database

The Guardian: Did you protest recently? Your face might be in a database. “In recent weeks, millions have taken to the streets to oppose police violence and proudly say: ‘Black Lives Matter.’ These protests will no doubt be featured in history books for many generations to come. But, as privacy researchers, we fear a darker legacy, too. We know that hundreds of thousands of photos and videos of protesters have been recorded and uploaded online. They could remain there indefinitely, only to be dredged up decades later. It is for this reason that we must ask whether those photos could end up in a facial recognition database.”

MLive: 5 reasons why summer parties are spiking coronavirus numbers when protests didn’t

MLive: 5 reasons why summer parties are spiking coronavirus numbers when protests didn’t. “Alarms being raised by public-health officials have raised questions among some in the public: Why are July 4 celebrations and other parties being cast as super-spreader events, when six weeks ago thousands were participating in demonstrations for the Black Lives Matter movement?”

Al Jazeera: Iranians take social media by storm to halt executions

Al Jazeera: Iranians take social media by storm to halt executions. “The ‘unprecedented’ drive saw the ‘Don’t execute’ hashtag in Persian topping Twitter trends in Iran for more than 24 hours, Trendsmap data showed on Wednesday, after reaching 4.5 million retweets worldwide the day before.”

New York Times: Are Protests Dangerous? What Experts Say May Depend on Who’s Protesting What

New York Times: Are Protests Dangerous? What Experts Say May Depend on Who’s Protesting What. “Public health experts decried the anti-lockdown protests as dangerous gatherings in a pandemic. Health experts seem less comfortable doing so now that the marches are against racism.”

Observer: Feeling Heat, Mark Zuckerberg Will Meet With Civil Rights Groups Boycotting Facebook

Observer: Feeling Heat, Mark Zuckerberg Will Meet With Civil Rights Groups Boycotting Facebook. “While the boycott may not make a significant dent in the company’s income, global brands such as Pepsi and Coca-Cola publicly calling for the platform to change is a big deal. And after a team of top Facebook executives failed to talk those advertisers out of it, CEO Mark Zuckerberg finally agreed to meet with the civil rights groups behind the boycott and hear what they want, a spokesperson confirmed to Reuters late Tuesday.”

New York Times: Did Floyd Protests Lead to a Virus Surge? Here’s What We Know

New York Times: Did Floyd Protests Lead to a Virus Surge? Here’s What We Know. “For more than two months, the authorities had been urging New Yorkers to stay indoors and keep their distance from others. But after the police killed George Floyd in Minneapolis, tens of thousands of New Yorkers poured into the streets, day and night, to protest police brutality and racism. Epidemiologists braced for a surge of new coronavirus cases. But it has not come yet.”

CNET: Coronavirus, BLM protest conspiracy theories collide on Facebook and Twitter

CNET: Coronavirus, BLM protest conspiracy theories collide on Facebook and Twitter. “A pandemic, societal protests and a contentious election have created an especially challenging environment for Facebook, Twitter and other social networks. Content moderators and fact-checkers are struggling to prevent the spread of obvious misinformation while giving users space to voice their opinions. The problem has gotten knottier for the online platforms as false claims about both the health crisis and Floyd’s killing collide, making content moderation decisions — taxing in the best of situations — even tougher.”

BuzzFeed News: Almost 17,000 Protesters Had No Idea A Tech Company Was Tracing Their Location

BuzzFeed News: Almost 17,000 Protesters Had No Idea A Tech Company Was Tracing Their Location. “On the weekend of May 29, thousands of people marched, sang, grieved, and chanted, demanding an end to police brutality and the defunding of police departments in the aftermath of the police killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor. They marched en masse in cities like Minneapolis, New York, Los Angeles, and Atlanta, empowered by their number and the assumed anonymity of the crowd. And they did so completely unaware that a tech company was using location data harvested from their cellphones to predict their race, age, and gender and where they lived.”