Ars Technica: After employee revolt, Google says it is “not close” to launching search in China

Ars Technica: After employee revolt, Google says it is “not close” to launching search in China. “Google’s employees and Google’s management are clashing over ethical issues again. Just two months after Google’s ‘Project Maven’ military drone project was seemingly resolved, Google’s employees are now up in arms over company plans to create censored products for China. The internal protests resulted in the issue being addressed at an all-hands meeting, and we got to learn a bit more about Google’s China plans.”

New York Times: Google Employees Protest Secret Work on Censored Search Engine for China

New York Times: Google Employees Protest Secret Work on Censored Search Engine for China. “Hundreds of Google employees, upset at the company’s decision to secretly build a censored version of its search engine for China, have signed a letter demanding more transparency to understand the ethical consequences of their work.”

BBC: Cambridge University anti-women students ‘confetti and rockets’ digitised

BBC: Cambridge University anti-women students ‘confetti and rockets’ digitised. “Confetti and fireworks, collected at an 1897 street protest opposing women’s rights to get university degrees, are to be digitised for public record. They date from a demonstration in Cambridge held by male students opposed to student equality.”

Phys .org: Bangladesh shuts down mobile internet to tackle teen protests

Phys .org: Bangladesh shuts down mobile internet to tackle teen protests. “Bangladesh authorities have shut down mobile internet across swathes of the country, officials and local media said Sunday, as the authorities try to quell massive student protests that have spiralled into violence. For the last week students have brought parts of the capital Dhaka to a standstill with a protest against poor road safety after two teenagers were killed by a speeding bus.”

New York Times: How Fake Influence Campaigns on Facebook Lured Real People

New York Times: How Fake Influence Campaigns on Facebook Lured Real People. “In late June, after word emerged that the white supremacists who organized last year’s deadly ‘Unite the Right’ march in Charlottesville, Va., had applied to hold an anniversary rally this month in Washington, a local political activist, Brendan Orsinger, saw that a Facebook event page had been created for a counterprotest. He recognized it as trouble. Little did he know just how much.”