The Verge: Facebook’s role in the French protests has polarized observers

The Verge: Facebook’s role in the French protests has polarized observers. “Facebook is one lens through which to view the French protests — but it’s not the only one. In the London Review of Books, Jeremy Harding examines the issue not according to the medium but to its message: widespread dissatisfaction with French President Emmanuel Macron, rising taxes, and stagnant wages. In Harding’s piece, Facebook is mentioned precisely once, in the context of how one of the movement’s organizers first came to prominence. That’s led some observers to question whether Facebook’s role in the protests is overstated.”

The Pixelated Revolution: The Power Of Hand-Held Footage To Change Political Narratives (The Oxford Student)

The Oxford Student: The Pixelated Revolution: The Power Of Hand-Held Footage To Change Political Narratives. “Recently, as digital photography has become better quality and developed to look more and more like its analogue counterpart, an idea has formed: that the clearer and the higher the resolution of the image we are being shown is, the more reflective of reality it is. Thus, a hierarchy of good versus bad images has established itself in our culture. This bad or ‘poor image’ is what artist Hito Steyerl describes as the ‘lumpen proletariat in the class society of appearances, ranked and valued according to its resolution.’ However, in the last few years, it is this blurred, shaky and pixelated image, resulting from the rise of the smartphone, that has become the most powerful.”

Digital Journalism: Digital Archiving as Social Protest

Digital Journalism: Digital Archiving as Social Protest. “The relationship between journalism and social marginalization is a relatively understudied area in digital journalism studies. Our case study of Dalit Camera (DC), an online news archive and chronicle based in India, examines how historically disadvantaged Dalits, or ‘Untouchables,’ are leveraging digital tools to narrate their oppressive past to the outside world parallel to the rise of political censorship in India. As part of its archiving process, DC is preserving footage of Dalit resistance against hegemonic domination by caste Hindus. Through their grassroots network of citizen journalists, DC is also engaged in reporting caste-based discrimination and violence today, contributing to the Dalit social movement for equality and justice. Our study provides the first examination of Dalit social protest as a function of digital news archiving, in the process bringing a non-Western subject typically reserved for Subaltern Studies to digital journalism studies as a potent example of citizen journalism and participatory online culture in a censorious media climate. “

BBC: Egypt sentences activist for ‘spreading fake news’

BBC News: Egypt sentences activist for ‘spreading fake news’. “A court in Egypt has given human rights activist Amal Fathy a two-year-suspended sentence and a fine for ‘spreading fake news’. She has been in detention since May after posting a video criticising the government over the extent of sexual harassment in the country.”

Africa Newsroom: In Ethiopia, mobile internet cut in the capital amid clashes and protests

Africa Newsroom: In Ethiopia, mobile internet cut in the capital amid clashes and protests. “The Committee to Protect Journalists today urged Ethiopian authorities to ensure internet is available, including during times of unrest when access to information provided by journalists is crucial. Mobile internet was unavailable in the capital Addis Abba, from September 17 to the morning of September 19 amid protests and clashes, according to media reports and Berhan Taye, who leads Access Now’s #KeepItOn campaign against internet shutdowns, which CPJ is part of.”

The Moscow Times: Russian Activists Launch Database to Profile Police Brutality

The Moscow Times: Russian Activists Launch Database to Profile Police Brutality. “A group of Russian activists has launched an online campaign to identify law-enforcement officers involved in a violent crackdown on anti-government protesters earlier this month. On Sept. 9, police detained hundreds of people across the country at protests against government plans to raise the retirement age. Police were filmed beating participants, including minors, with batons and dragging them away to be detained.”

Today Online: Thai police charge founder of new party over Facebook speech

Today Online: Thai police charge founder of new party over Facebook speech. “Thai police on Monday charged the founder and two members of a new political party opposed to military rule with violating a computer crime law, an offense that could result in a five-year jail sentence, a fine of 100,000 baht ($3,062.79) or both.”