CNN: Civil rights groups invited to Zuckerberg’s home slam Facebook’s ‘lackluster response’

CNN: Civil rights groups invited to Zuckerberg’s home slam Facebook’s ‘lackluster response’. “Facebook’s policies on political ads are being criticized yet again, with several civil rights leaders recently invited to CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s home slamming what they say is a ‘lackluster response’ to their concerns.”

Speak Out Against Exorbitant Fees: Deadline is December 16 (California Ancestors Blog)

California Ancestors Blog: Speak Out Against Exorbitant Fees: Deadline is December 16. “The genealogy world is abuzz with news that U.S. Customs and Immigration Services (USCIS) has proposed a sharp increase in fees for searches and copies of genealogical and historical records, beginning in 2020…. The records include naturalization certificates, alien registration forms, visa and registry files, and alien files (A-Files), all invaluable resources for researchers. The bureau already charges a nonrefundable $65 fee per search. It proposes to raise that search fee to an exorbitant $240—an increase of 269 percent.”

The Conversation: On the Battle of Seattle’s 20th anniversary, let’s remember the Aussie coders who created live sharing

The Conversation: On the Battle of Seattle’s 20th anniversary, let’s remember the Aussie coders who created live sharing. “Today, online publishing allows multiple people to post text and multimedia content simultaneously to websites in real time, and have others comment on posts. But this format, used on sites like Facebook and Twitter, was first conceptualised, coded and adopted by a handful of Sydney-based activists back in the 1990s. These individuals were pioneers in kickstarting the digital disruption of mainstream media, and their actions enabled the world to openly and easily share content online.”

Blavity: There Is Now A Database Documenting The Stories Of More Than 160 Black Women Radicals Thanks To This Howard University Student

Blavity: There Is Now A Database Documenting The Stories Of More Than 160 Black Women Radicals Thanks To This Howard University Student. “With a desire to bring Black women and nonbinary activists out of the heavy depths of forgotten history, [Jaimee] Swift founded Black Women Radicals, an organization that shines a light on past and present leadership across the African diaspora. After over a year of dedicated research, Swift did a soft launch in October.”

CNET: Google says it fired four employees for breaking data security rules

CNET: Google says it fired four employees for breaking data security rules. “Google has fired four employees for breaking rules related to data security, according to a staff memo Bloomberg published in a report Monday. The terminations come days after approximately 200 Google workers and other supporters held a rally outside one of Google’s San Francisco offices. The activists at the rally Friday alleged that Google management is retaliating against employees for speaking out against the search giant.”

CNET: TikTok apologizes for removing viral video criticizing Chinese treatment of Uighur Muslim community

CNET: TikTok apologizes for removing viral video criticizing Chinese treatment of Uighur Muslim community. “TikTok has published a lengthy blog post addressing the “interest and confusion” surrounding an anti-Chinese video that went viral earlier this week. A young TikTok user had posted a makeup video while raising awareness about Uighur Muslim community being detained in China. TikTok said Wednesday it wanted to ‘clarify’ and apologize for human error in removing the video.”

The Nation: The Hong Kongers Building a Case Against the Police

The Nation: The Hong Kongers Building a Case Against the Police . “Those on Hong Kong social media—especially on Twitter and some channels on Telegram, the secure messaging app preferred by the protesters—have made a concerted effort to document and publicize police brutality. #HongKongPoliceBrutality and #HongKongPoliceTerrorism are just two of the hashtags Hong Kongers use on Twitter as they recirculate videos and graphics contextualizing the violence. These netizen-protesters see themselves as being on the front lines of the information war over Hong Kong, coordinating a PR campaign to raise awareness—and get the international attention that they see as crucial to their movement’s success.” This was a great story, but The Nation had an pop-in ad for its mailing list that was really intrusive. I could only get rid of it by reloading the page.