University of Michigan: How students used social media and memes to change a University of Michigan sexual health policy

Michigan Advance: How students used social media and memes to change a University of Michigan sexual health policy . “The University of Michigan has a long history of politically active movements, from the 1962 Port Huron Statement, the first-ever teach-in in 1965 and picket-sign style protests to fight segregation. But today, students have a new form of political creativity: memes, Twitter updates and Instagram stories.”

BBC: How apps power Hong Kong’s ‘leaderless’ protests

BBC: How apps power Hong Kong’s ‘leaderless’ protests. “In a tiny room on the edge of a nondescript building complex sits an unlikely participant in Hong Kong’s protest movement. Behind his laptop computer, Tony (not his real name) monitors scores of groups on private messaging app Telegram and online forums. Organisers say volunteers like Tony are running hundreds of Telegram groups that are powering Hong Kong’s protest turned civil disobedience campaign. They claim that more than two million people have taken to the streets in recent weeks to express opposition to a controversial extradition law.”

Ozy: Distrusting The Press, Arab Youth Turn To Social Media

Ozy: Distrusting The Press, Arab Youth Turn To Social Media. “Ahmad couldn’t believe his eyes when he saw the headline. It was December 2017 and Mada Masr — Egypt’s last independent outlet — published an investigation detailing how a front for the Egyptian intelligence agency bought seven of the country’s most prominent media outlets. ‘I knew never to trust mainstream Egyptian media again,’ says Ahmad, a 23-year-old activist who asked not to disclose his last name for fear of reprisal. ‘From then on, Facebook became the only place where I could get my breaking news, but I also check Mada Masr.'”

Coda Story: Cambodia’s Internet crackdown reaches its activist monks

Coda Story: Cambodia’s Internet crackdown reaches its activist monks. “The sexually explicit photos were plastered over Venerable Luon Sovath’s Facebook page, with its more than 100,000 followers. ‘The monk lacks morals,’ one of the messages read. On the same day, his YouTube channel was also hacked, along with his personal email. Sovath doesn’t know who was behind the attack and about five others that have targeted his pages. But he is the most well-known of Cambodia’s tech-capable monks, who have become citizen journalists, videoing stories throughout Cambodia and sharing them on social media.”

Radio Free Europe: Russian Activist Charged Over Facebook Post Amid ‘Crackdown’ On Social Media

Radio Free Europe: Russian Activist Charged Over Facebook Post Amid ‘Crackdown’ On Social Media. “Human Rights Watch (HRW) has called on the Russian authorities to drop the case against an opposition activist who is facing administrative charges for posting an infographic from a news outlet backed by former oil tycoon and Kremlin critic Mikhail Khodorkovsky.”

New Delhi Times: Zimbabwe Activists Push Back on Social Media Restrictions

New Delhi Times: Zimbabwe Activists Push Back on Social Media Restrictions. “In Zimbabwe, rights and opposition groups are surviving by using social media to communicate with the masses as state-owned media remain reserved for ruling party officials. During recent anti-government protests, the public received information through social media and now the government wants a law to block such platforms.”

South China Morning Post: LinkedIn reverses course after censoring Chinese profile page of US-based human rights activist Zhou Fengsuo

South China Morning Post: LinkedIn reverses course after censoring Chinese profile page of US-based human rights activist Zhou Fengsuo. “LinkedIn has restored access to the profile page of a prominent Chinese human rights activist, a day after the career networking site told him his page in China had been censored in accordance with the company’s commitment to adhering to the ‘requirements of the Chinese government’.”