USC: First-of-its-kind media studies lab launches at USC to amplify Black social change makers on the West Coast

USC: First-of-its-kind media studies lab launches at USC to amplify Black social change makers on the West Coast. “As the University of Southern California’s first media studies center dedicated to saving, studying and sharing the work of prominent and hidden figures who have been central to Black social justice movements in America, the Bass Lab will create a web archive that serves as a repository for Black media and activist journalism. The archive will include digitized newspapers, magazines, photojournalism and scanned 3D objects that tell the story of Black life and culture on the West Coast. Original content in the form of recorded interviews and oral histories will also be featured. ”

Hooking Candiru: Another Mercenary Spyware Vendor Comes into Focus (CitizenLab)

CitizenLab: Hooking Candiru: Another Mercenary Spyware Vendor Comes into Focus. “Candiru is a secretive Israel-based company that sells spyware exclusively to governments. Reportedly, their spyware can infect and monitor iPhones, Androids, Macs, PCs, and cloud accounts. Using Internet scanning we identified more than 750 websites linked to Candiru’s spyware infrastructure.”

New York Times: Twitter Worker Accused of Spying for Saudi Arabia Heads to Trial

New York Times: Twitter Worker Accused of Spying for Saudi Arabia Heads to Trial. “While working at Twitter from 2013 to 2015, Ahmad Abouammo was responsible for helping celebrities, journalists and other notable figures in the Middle East promote their Twitter accounts. He handled requests for Twitter’s coveted blue verification badges and arranged tours of the San Francisco headquarters. But the Justice Department says he misused his access to Twitter user data, gathering the personal information of political dissidents and passing it to Saudi Arabia in exchange for a luxury watch and hundreds of thousands of dollars.”

WIRED: Police Linked to Hacking Campaign to Frame Indian Activists

WIRED: Police Linked to Hacking Campaign to Frame Indian Activists. “POLICE FORCES AROUND the world have increasingly used hacking tools to identify and track protesters, expose political dissidents’ secrets, and turn activists’ computers and phones into inescapable eavesdropping bugs. Now, new clues in a case in India connect law enforcement to a hacking campaign that used those tools to go an appalling step further: planting false incriminating files on targets’ computers that the same police then used as grounds to arrest and jail them.”

Cincinnati Public Library: 50 Years of Protest Posters, Photos, and Flyers Scanned for the Library’s Digital Collection

Cincinnati Public Library: 50 Years of Protest Posters, Photos, and Flyers Scanned for the Library’s Digital Collection. “The images, part of the upcoming Contemporary Arts Center (CAC) exhibit, Artist Run Spaces, include protest posters, photos, slides, and flyers from fifty years of organizing work by the community organization Over-the-Rhine People’s Movement. The images are now available for high resolution viewing on the Library’s Digital Library, opens a new window.”

Empty galleries and fleeing artists: Russia’s cultural uncoupling from the west (The Guardian)

The Guardian: Empty galleries and fleeing artists: Russia’s cultural uncoupling from the west . “On a recent Saturday in April, Muscovites strolled around GES-2, a vast new arts centre built in a disused power station steps away from the Kremlin. But guests visiting the 54,400-sq-metre centre, designed by the pioneering Italian architect Renzo Piano, were faced with one hard-to-miss problem: the art was absent. ‘It is not the time for contemporary art when people are dying and blood is spilling. We can’t pretend as if life is normal,’ said Evgeny Antufiev, a Russian artist who asked for his works to be removed from GES-2 shortly after Russia invaded Ukraine on 24 February.”

The New Yorker: How Democracies Spy on Their Citizens

The New Yorker: How Democracies Spy on Their Citizens. “Commercial spyware has grown into an industry estimated to be worth twelve billion dollars. It is largely unregulated and increasingly controversial. In recent years, investigations by the Citizen Lab and Amnesty International have revealed the presence of Pegasus on the phones of politicians, activists, and dissidents under repressive regimes. An analysis by Forensic Architecture, a research group at the University of London, has linked Pegasus to three hundred acts of physical violence.”

NPR: Meet the activists who projected a giant Ukrainian flag on Russia’s Embassy in D.C.

NPR: Meet the activists who projected a giant Ukrainian flag on Russia’s Embassy in D.C.. “Anti-war activists engaged in a light beam battle against Russian diplomats in Washington, D.C., Wednesday evening in a display of disapproval over the country’s ongoing war in Ukraine. The activists spent hours projecting the Ukrainian flag on the Russian Embassy’s exterior walls with ultra-bright light.”